Researchers in Japan Accidentally Created Melt-Resistant Ice Cream

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iStock

Researchers in Japan have reportedly invented the ultimate summer treat: ice cream popsicles that don't melt.

As Quartz reports, scientists from the Biotherapy Development Research Center Co. in Kanazawa, the capital of Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, asked a pastry chef to make them a new dessert using polyphenol liquid extracted from strawberries. They were trying to find a use for berries harvested in Miyagi Prefecture, which is still recovering from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

The berries aren’t in good enough shape to be sold, hence the scientists' desire to repurpose them, but the pastry chef complained that the polyphenol liquid solidified cream on contact, making it difficult to work with. Intrigued, the research center realized it might be on to something, and it began experimenting with different milks, creams, and polyphenol concentrations to make a melt-resistant ice cream popsicle, Japanese daily newspaper The Asahi Shimbun reports.

“Polyphenol liquid has properties to make it difficult for water and oil to separate so that a popsicle containing it will be able to retain the original shape of the cream for a longer time than usual and be hard to melt,” Tomihisa Ota, a professor emeritus of pharmacy at Kanazawa University who helped develop the dessert, explained.

The Biotherapy Development Research Center officially began marketing their finished product in April 2017. The popsicles—which are now sold in shops in Kanazawa, Tokyo, and Osaka—can reportedly retain a solid shape even when blasted with a hair dryer for five minutes, and will still taste cool to boot. Now, if the scientists could only make the sweet treats available in the U.S.

Check out the new, melt-resistant popsicles below:

[h/t Quartz]

Wisconsin Brewery Rolls Out a Candy Corn Beer

iStock.com/AleksandarNakic
iStock.com/AleksandarNakic

Move over, pumpkin ale. A brewery in the Milwaukee area has brewed up some candy corn beer just in time for Halloween. According to WMUR News 9, the sugary cream ale will be served on tap at the Westallion Brewing Company in West Allis, Wisconsin, throughout October.

The divisive confection is typically made from sugar, corn syrup, gelatin, and artificial coloring, but the brewery decided to make its own flavoring. “Instead of smashing up some candy corns and throwing them in our beer, we made our own candy corn out of less beer-destructive ingredients and threw them into our beer!” the brewery said in a Facebook post. “At the base, we created a cream ale using lactose sugars to keep some sweetness, but added Simcoe hops to create a bit of a bite and a balance (and maybe help remind us that it’s still beer?).”

While candy corn beer is likely to be less popular than its seasonal pumpkin counterpart, other breweries have taken on the challenge in the past. In 2016, The Star Tribune reported that a candy corn imperial ale was “scary popular” at Urban Growler, a microbrewery in St. Paul, Minnesota. "It started as a joke three years ago when we needed to come up with a fall beer," co-owner/master brewer Deb Loch told the paper. "It went over so well that we had to make it every year."

Cigar City Brewing in Tampa, Florida, has also made a Candy Corn IPA in the past, and one brave soul sought advice from the Homebrewtalk.com community in 2009 on how to brew an appropriate beer for a “Hate Candy Corn Party.” Some inspiration for your next Halloween bash, perhaps?

[h/t WMUR]

Find the Best Wine to Pair With Your Favorite Halloween Candy

iStock/vadimguzhva
iStock/vadimguzhva

When you're a kid, Halloween is all about the candy. Unfortunately, the more sophisticated palate that often comes with adulthood can dampen the former thrill of a holiday that’s largely about cheap scares and even cheaper candy.

Thankfully, the folks at Vivino, a popular wine app, have found a way to help elevate the Halloween candy game (and with it, your joy). Their “Halloween Candy and Wine Matchmaker” pairs popular candies, from Skittles to Swedish Fish, with wine selections, to make sure your many treats complement one another.

As Vivino founder Heini Zachariassen told The Huffington Post, "Our candy and wine matchmaker is a fun way for our users to learn and talk about wine in a way that feels relatable and fun. Besides, Halloween is scary enough, we don't think picking a wine needs to be."

The best news of all? Many of the wines and candies have multiple pairing options—which means you can try out different flavor combos faster than you can say “trick or treat.”

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