The Most Overused Business Jargon in Each State

Textio
Textio

The business world loves some jargon. Corporate leaders are always touting near-meaningless words like “synergy” and used-to-death office phrases like “let’s touch base” (what base?). Job listings start to blur together when every company you apply to work for is looking for “a badass.”

Textio is an AI-driven service that analyzes job postings and identifies the phrases and patterns that lead to the most responses from qualified applications and the quickest hires. The company recently combed through its database of 250 million corporate job postings to find the most common business jargon clichés in each state, revealing how the group-think of corporate hiring can vary from state to state.

In Oregon, it seems, candidates need to be ready for some “revolutioneering,” while California employers ask potential hires to “tee up.” Oklahoma companies claim to be on the “bleeding edge,” and New Yorkers better get ready to “herd cats.” (Not exactly a full-throated endorsement for the state’s workforce.) Not to be left out for lack of statehood, Washington D.C. companies are looking to “shift the paradigm.”

In its editing services, Textio highlights this kind of unspecific, clichéd language as “red flags” for companies looking to attract highly qualified job seekers with their postings—and it’s right to. Jargon is devoid of meaning, and using it turns people off. No one applies for a job looking to “achieve alignment,” and no one needs to be told that their future company is looking for someone to “increase productivity.” What is getting aligned? What kind of productivity? What job wouldn’t involve “corporate values” in some way?

It’s great that Textio brought this to the table, leveraging its expertise in the field. Hopefully reading this will be a change-driver. Maybe it will help your company with its message alignment, or help you craft a really great statement of duties. Go ahead, blaze a trail with that job posting. Go the extra mile. That’s where the magic truly happens, after all. Let’s touch base later. It’s just good practice. Just make sure to have an exit strategy.

The Most Popular Kid-Friendly Scary Movie In Each State, Mapped

Frontier
Frontier

If you’re settling down on the couch to watch 1993 classic The Nightmare Before Christmas this Halloween season, you’re not alone. It’s one of the most searched-for kid-friendly Halloween movies in the U.S. this year, according to data compiled by telecom company Frontier. As Fatherly reports, Frontier looked at Google Trends data from all 50 states to see which PG- and G-rated movies are most popular across the country.

The list draws on data from the entire year and includes 15 different movies, not all of which you would automatically consider Halloween movies. (Harry Potter films may involve ghosts, but they're not what you typically sit down to watch immediately after carving jack-o-lanterns.) It does feature spooky standbys like Beetlejuice (1988), Hocus Pocus (1993), Casper (1995), and Halloweentown (1998), as well as kids' favorites from the past few years like 2012 movies Frankenweenie and Hotel Transylvania.

A table of icons representing different childrens' movies
Frontier

The data shows there's variability from state-to-state when it comes to which ghosts and goblins kids prefer to see onscreen, and it’s not always regionally specific. Ghostbusters (1984) tops the list in 10 different states, mostly throughout the northern part of the nation. Coco (2017) is beloved by Californians (no surprise there—it’s also the state’s favorite Pixar movie, according to similar data) but it’s also the top movie in Washington, Idaho, Nebraska, Illinois, and Ohio. Beetlejuice is a hit in Colorado, Alabama, and New Hampshire.

Did your favorite make the list?

[h/t Fatherly]

Each State's Favorite Celebrity Chef

Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Vegas Uncork'd by Bon Appetit
Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Vegas Uncork'd by Bon Appetit

Whether they specialize in baking, travel, or food science, celebrity chefs are an American obsession. For the map below, USDirect sifted through Google Trends data to determine where in the country television's most famous foodies are most popular.

The late Anthony Bourdain, host of No Reservations and Parts Unknown, is the celebrity chef with the most widespread appeal. The well-traveled television personality is the top-searched chef in 10 states, including Texas, Florida, and California. Host of Good Eats and Iron Chef America Alton Brown is a close runner-up, dominating search trends in Missouri, Oregon, Alaska, and five more states.

Unsurprisingly, many celebrity chefs are the favorites of their home states. In Louisiana, New Orleans chef Emeril Lagasse is number one, while Duff Goldman of Charm City Cakes is beloved in Maryland. Pioneer woman Ree Drummond is the favorite food star in her home state of Oklahoma and Cleveland chef Michael Symon takes Ohio.

In Nevada, no one chef reigns supreme. Wolfgang Puck, Bobby Flay, Robert Irvine, Gordon Ramsay, and Guy Fieri are all tied for most popular, and for good reason—between them, they own 16 restaurants in Las Vegas.

The round-up shows that American chefs aren't the only celebrities people search for in the states: Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry of The Great British Bake Off both appear on the map.

To see which celebrity chef your home state loves, check out the map below.

Map of popular celebrity chefs.
USDirect

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