Dive Into What the Web Looked Like 10 Years Ago With This Site

Ten Years Ago
Ten Years Ago

When it comes to the internet, our memories can be short. It’s hard to imagine life without reddit or YouTube, which didn’t come around until 2005, or Gmail, which was technically a beta product until 2009. And responsive web design wasn’t really a thing until 2012. The internet of a decade ago looked a lot different than it does now.

New website Ten Years Ago makes it easy to look back into the weird world of mostly forgotten web history, as The Next Web reports. The site peers into the World Wide Web as of July 28, 2007, showing the now-simplistic-looking early designs of sites like YouTube, Amazon, The New York Times, and reddit. And old-school web design isn't the only retro treat. You also get to enjoy the advertising of 2007, back when John Mayer was enticing people to watch Live Earth and fans were eagerly awaiting The Simpsons Movie.

The site is powered by the Internet Archive’s Way Back Machine, which captures web pages as they appear now so that they can be used as citations later. Ten Years Ago is a useful tool in that it gathers together sites captured on the same day, so you can recreate what you might see if you were trawling the web on that day in July 2007. Back when even Apple, one of the most design-obsessed companies around, had a website that looked a little clunky.

Chances are, the web will look even more radically different a decade or more in the future. Will we still remember what YouTube looked like now? Probably not. Enjoy thinking of the web design of 2017 as cutting-edge while you can. Someday, it will seem ridiculously outdated.

[h/t The Next Web]

C Is for Comfort: Bombas Just Launched a Sesame Street Sock Line

Bombas
Bombas

You know that warm, fuzzy feeling you get when you think about the Muppets? You can now wear it on your feet. Bombas just released a limited-edition line of socks inspired by the likes of Elmo, Cookie Monster, and other beloved Sesame Street characters.

Pairs of 'Sesame Street'-inspired socks arrayed on the floor
Bombas

The new Bombas x Sesame Street sock designs are subtle nods to your favorite children’s programming. They don’t feature garish patterns; instead, they rely on minimalist interpretations of characters like Oscar the Grouch, the Count, and Bert and Ernie.

Two pairs of legs wearing Bert and Grover socks
Bombas

The Oscar socks feature a gray, green, and brown-striped pattern, while the yellow Bert socks feature a multi-colored stripe that evokes his signature shirt. The blue Grover socks have a pink circle and red stripe that look like his nose and mouth. The Elmo socks are the only ones that feature eyes, while the Cookie Monster socks feature a single chocolate chip cookie.

A pair of legs wearing Cookie Monster socks
Bombas

A man's legs showing off red Elmo socks
Bombas

In fact, if anyone sees these peeking out of your pants, it’s unlikely they’ll realize they’re Muppet-inspired, so feel free to wear them even to your fanciest events and meetings.

The socks go for $14 a pair for adults, $8 a pair for kids. Toddler socks go for $30 per pack of four. Get yourself a pair (or several) here.

This Modular Bike Goes From Stroller to Trike to Two-Wheeler as Your Child Grows

Monkeycycle, Kickstarter
Monkeycycle, Kickstarter

When kids outgrow their bikes, most parents settle for buying an entirely new model and leaving the old one to collect dust in the garage. The Monkeycycle, a new eight-in-one bike design available on Kickstarter, works differently. After buying the kit, parents can reconfigure and build upon the bike over the years so it changes at the same rate their child does, following them from 9 months old to 6 years old.

The first model in the Monkeycycle's evolution is a stroller that includes an adjustable handle and child seat that can be removed and attached to an adult-sized bike. When children reach 12 to 14 months old, parents can convert the stroller to a tricycle. As kids get taller, the bike can grow, too. The body of the trike curves to provide a low seat when placed one way and a taller seat when flipped over.

Two girls on bikes outdoors
Monkeycycle, Kickstarter

From there, the trike easily switches to a balance bike. Parents can also arrange the wheels to make a quad and a "tadpole trike" with two wheels in front and one in back. Then, once kids are ready to start controlling a two-wheeler on their own, the Monkeycycle can be transformed into a traditional pedal bike.

To get a full Monkeycycle kit, you can pledge $349 or more to the project's Kickstarter campaign before December 13. Monkeycycle is also offering a limited number of basic kits, which only include the balance bike and two-wheeler modules, starting from $200. The stroller option is not included in any of the kits yet, but if the campaign reaches its stretch goal of $150,000, it will be available as an add-on for $150.

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