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Image credit: Aziz Aboobaker, Edinburgh

The Tardigrade’s Extraordinary Weirdness Continues

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Image credit: Aziz Aboobaker, Edinburgh

The mystery of the tardigrade—a.k.a. moss piglet, a.k.a. water bear—is one step closer to a solution. Scientists studying the microscopic animals' DNA say the tough, many-legged creatures may be distantly related to nematodes and other "wormy things." The researchers published their findings in the journal PLOS Biology.

Tardigrades are some of the strangest, most badass organisms on Earth. Don't be fooled by their tiny size—these animals are anything but delicate. They can survive in the most brutal conditions, from dehydration and starvation to burning heat, blistering cold, intense radiation, and even the vacuum of space.

How they pull off this near-invincibility is, naturally, a question of some interest among biologists (and to Mental Floss—links to our many articles about these amazing creatures are found throughout this story).

The authors of one 2015 study made headlines when they announced that one-sixth of the tardigrade's genetic blueprint had been swiped from bacteria and other organisms. This horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is not unheard of in nature, but other tardigrade experts, including a team at the University of Edinburgh, felt that 17.5 percent seemed suspiciously high, even for a maverick like the tardigrade.

The skeptics were right. Additional investigation into the tardigrade genome confirmed the presence of a few horizontally transferred genes. Just a few.

HGT aside, there's still plenty to discover in the tardigrade's genes. Tardigrades have been tardigrades for hundreds of millions of years. No fossils remain from their early days to tell us what they might have been before. We don't really know where they came from, evolutionarily speaking, or who their relatives are.

To find out, Edinburgh researcher Mark Blaxter and his colleagues picked apart the genomes of two tardigrade species, Ramazzottius varieornatus and Hypsibius dujardini. They found something unexpected: The armored, many-legged tardigrades seemed more closely related to worms than to insects.

If these findings are accurate, Blaxter told Mental Floss in an email, they challenge the very structure of the Panarthropoda family tree, which assumes "the leggy moulting animals are more closely related to each other than they are to wormy things like nematodes."

But he notes that there's lots more research to be done before issuing that challenge: "We have only looked at a tiny fraction of the 10 or more million species on Earth. Every new group, and possibly every species, will have something exciting in it we haven't seen before, and didn't imagine."

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This High-Tech Material Can Change Shape Like an Octopus
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Octopuses can do some pretty amazing things with their skin, like “see” light, resist the pull of their own sticky suction cups, and blend in seamlessly with their surroundings. That last part now has the U.S. Army interested, as Co.Design reports. The military branch’s research office has funded the development a new type of morphing material that works like an octopus’s dynamic skin.

The skin of an octopus is covered in small, muscular bumps called papillae that allow them to change textures in a fraction of a second. Using this mechanism, octopuses can mimic coral, rocks, and even other animals. The new government-funded research—conducted by scientists at Cornell University—produced a device that works using a similar principle.

“Technologies that use stretchable materials are increasingly important, yet we are unable to control how they stretch with much more sophistication than inflating balloons,” the scientists write in their study, recently published in the journal Science. “Nature, however, demonstrates remarkable control of stretchable surfaces.”

The membrane of the stretchy, silicone material lays flat most of the time, but when it’s inflated with air, it can morph to form almost any 3D shape. So far, the technology has been used to imitate rocks and plants.

You can see the synthetic skin transform from a two-dimensional pad to 3D models of objects in the video below:

It’s easy to see how this feature could be used in military gear. A soldier’s suit made from material like this could theoretically provide custom camouflage for any environment in an instant. Like a lot of military technology, it could also be useful in civilian life down the road. Co.Design writer Jesus Diaz brings up examples like buttons that appear on a car's dashboard only when you need them, or a mixing bowl that rises from the surface of the kitchen counter while you're cooking.

Even if we can mimic the camouflage capabilities of cephalopods, though, other impressive superpowers, like controlling thousands of powerful suction cups or squeezing through spaces the size of a cherry tomato, are still the sole domain of the octopus. For now.

[h/t Co.Design]

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Animals
25 Benefits of Adopting a Rescue Dog
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According to the ASPCA, 3.3 million dogs enter shelters each year in the United States. Although that number has gone down since 2011 (from 3.9 million) there are still millions of dogs waiting in shelters for a forever home. October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month; here are 25 benefits of adopting a shelter dog.

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