3 Ways We Can (Kind of) Control the Weather, and 5 Ways We Can't

Humans have the incredible ability to control the world around us. We can move mountains and land robots on other planets. We can keep each other alive longer than ever before and even bring entire species back from the brink of extinction. But despite all of our leaps forward, we're still unable to control the weather, a tremendous force that affects every human being on this planet. Still, humans have come up with some pretty crafty ways of influencing the weather—in small doses.

1. WE CAN MAKE IT RAIN … SOMEWHAT.

The desire to control weather has been a mainstay of imagination since, well, the beginning of imagination. The fortunes of entire societies can hinge on flood or drought. We have strong motivation to want to create a rainstorm in one spot or moderate snowfall in another. But the greatest success we've ever had is a technique that can (maybe) encourage a tiny bit of rain to form over a tiny area.

Cloud seeding is a process through which fine particles like silver iodide are released into a cloud in order to encourage the formation of rain or snow. These particulates serve as a nucleus around which water vapor can condense and turn into a raindrop or a snowflake. This is most commonly done with small airplanes, but it can also be accomplished by launching tiny rockets or flares from the ground.

In theory, the practice of cloud seeding could have innumerable uses around the world, including crop maintenance, providing drinking water, and even possibly weakening severe thunderstorms or hurricanes. There's only one problem: It doesn't work all that well.

The effectiveness of cloud seeding is a hot topic of debate among scientists, but most studies have either found negligible impacts on precipitation, or the researchers were unable to determine the exact impact of cloud seeding. Cloud seeding is a great concept if you want to help one cloud produce a little extra rain or snow just to say you can do it, but it's not the way to go if you're desperate and want to trigger a deluge. This process requires the pre-existing presence of clouds, so even if the technology improves in the future, it's not a viable solution for drought-stricken areas that haven't seen meaningful clouds in weeks.

2. WE CAN DEFINITELY ATTRACT LIGHTNING USING ROCKETS.

Lightning safety is one of the things you learn from a very young age. "When thunder roars, go indoors," as the motto goes. We learn to stay away from open areas and water during thunderstorms. But what if you wanted to attract lightning? It's surprisingly easy to do if you have the right equipment and really, really want to encounter some of nature's fury.

Scientists who want to study lightning can bring it right to their doorstep by using specially designed rockets attached to conductive wires that lead to the ground below. When a thunderstorm blows over the observation station, operators can launch these rockets up into the clouds to trigger a lightning strike that follows the wire right down to the ground where the rocket was launched. Voila, instant lightning. Just add rocket fuel.

3. WE CAN CREATE CLOUDS AND HEAT—EVEN WHEN WE DON'T MEAN TO.

Most of the ways in which we control—or, more accurately, influence—the weather is through indirect human actions—often unintentional. "Whoops, the nuclear power plant just caused a snowstorm" isn't as crazy as it sounds. Steam stacks can and do produce clouds and updrafts with enough intensity to create rain or snow immediately downwind. The very presence of cities can generate microclimates with warmer temperatures and heavier rain. And there's also climate change, the process in which our accumulated actions over a long period of time are influencing the very climate itself.

BUT WE CAN'T DO THE FIVE FOLLOWING THINGS.

Despite our limited ability to influence a few aspects of weather over small areas, there are some rather colorful conspiracy theories about whether or not governments and organizations are telling the whole truth about how much we can accomplish with today's technology. There are folks who insist that the trails of condensed water vapor, or "contrails," left behind jet aircraft are really chemicals being sprayed for sinister purposes. (They're not.) There are theories that a high-frequency, high-power array of antennas deep in the Alaskan wilderness can control every weather disaster in the world. (It doesn't.) There are even folks who insist that Doppler weather radar carries enough energy to "zap" storms into existence on demand. (Dr. Evil wishes.)

There are also some bizarre and unworkable theories that are offered in good faith. A meteorologist a few years ago opined on whether building an excessively tall wall across middle America could disrupt weather patterns that could lead to tornado activity. And every year the National Hurricane Center is peppered with questions about whether or not detonating nuclear bombs in a hurricane would disrupt the storm's structure. Unfortunately, while pseudoscience offers up great theories to test in the movies, when it comes to weather, we're still not in control.

A Pile of Manure and a Heat Wave Combined to Cause Spain’s Worst Wildfire in 20 Years

Lumppini, iStock/Getty Images Plus
Lumppini, iStock/Getty Images Plus
A pile of manure in Spain ignited on June 27, sparking a wildfire that has torn through more than 10,000 acres of forest and other Catalonian landscapes, CNN reports. The manure combusted in part because of a scorching heat wave that has swept across Europe this week; temperatures in the affected region hit 104°F, and Germany, Poland, and the Czech Republic all reached record-breaking June temps. Catalan regional interior minister Miquel Buch reported that authorities believe the manure was improperly stored on a chicken farm in the village of La Torre de l’Espanyol, where it was exposed to the worst of the heat, according to NBC News. The wildfire—Spain’s most devastating in 20 years—is affecting the region just west of Tarragona, a port city that is best known for its Roman ruins, which is situated along the Balearic Sea about 60 miles southwest of Barcelona. [[{"fid":"315211","view_mode":"width-constrained-728","fields":{"format":"width-constrained-728","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","field_image_subhead[und][0][value]":"","field_image_subhead[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_credits[und][0][value]":"PeterHermesFurian%2C%20iStock%2FGetty%20Images%20Plus","field_credits[und][0][format]":"unfiltered"},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"width-constrained-728","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","field_image_subhead[und][0][value]":"","field_image_subhead[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_credits[und][0][value]":"PeterHermesFurian%2C%20iStock%2FGetty%20Images%20Plus","field_credits[und][0][format]":"unfiltered"}},"link_text":false,"attributes":{"alt":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","height":728,"width":728,"class":"media-element file-width-constrained-728","data-delta":"1"}}]] The firefighting force includes about 350 firefighters, 12 fire engines, seven aircraft, two hydroplanes, and additional vehicles equipped with water tanks—all of which are techniques regularly used to fight massive blazes. Though high temperatures are expected to continue and the rough terrain itself is also a contributing factor in the rapid spread of the fire, the strong winds should soon abate; authorities have warned people to stay inside. Though more than 50 people have been evacuated from the area, no deaths have been reported thus far. While the spontaneous combustion of flammable materials like manure, hay, or compost is definitely possible, as evidenced by this situation, it’s not the most common way for wildfires to start. More common causes include lit cigarettes, unattended campfires, burning debris, and engine sparks. [h/t CNN]

Colorado Welcomed Summer With 2 Feet of Snow

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

While people in some parts of the country celebrated the first day of summer with barbecues and trips to the beach, residents of north and north-central Colorado had a snow day. Areas west of Denver—including Grand Lake, Aspen, and Steamboat Springs—experienced snow storms on summer solstice, with snowfall totaling nearly 2 feet at the highest elevations, CBS Denver reports.

Snow started falling in the Rocky Mountains the morning of Friday, June 21 and continued Sunday. Areas at ground level weren't cold enough to experience the unusual weather, but at elevations of 7000 feet and above, it looked like a winter wonderland. Steamboat Springs, a ski resort town in Colorado’s Yampa Valley, accumulated 20 inches of snow on the longest day of the year.

While Colorado mountain towns are used to seeing snow at odd times of year, the weekend's weather was still out of the ordinary. The average snowfall for Steamboat Springs in June is 0.1 inches. Prior to last Friday, it had been 91 years since a snowstorm hit the city in late June.

Snow has fallen in the Rockies later than average in six out of the past seven years. Though it feels like an extension of winter, the trend may actually be a product of the warming atmosphere. A warmer climate affects the jet stream, potentially pushing its course further south and leading to unusual weather patterns, such as unseasonable snowstorms in Colorado.

That means residents of some parts of the state will have to wait to have their summer hikes and picnics. The weather was serious enough to shut down one road in Rocky Mountain National Park.

[h/t CBS Denver]

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