What You'll See of the 2017 Solar Eclipse From Your ZIP Code

Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

On August 21, a total solar eclipse will cross over the continental United States, giving millions of people the exciting experience of watching the Sun briefly disappear, leaving the Earth in darkness. But whether or not you'll be able to experience total darkness depends on where you live. How do you know how much of the Sun you'll see? Check out this infographic from Vox illustrating what the eclipse will look like in each ZIP code in the U.S.

For instance, we at the Mental Floss offices in New York will still be standing in pretty bright light as the eclipse peaks at 2:44:55 p.m. EDT, with 71.4 percent of the Sun covered. We would need to drive 576 miles to see the total eclipse, according to Vox. In Lincoln, Nebraska, though, the Moon will obscure the whole Sun at 1:03:18 p.m. CDT, leaving residents in the dark for about a minute and a half. In Anchorage, Alaska, 1381 miles from the totality zone, residents will see 45.6 percent of the Sun disappear at the eclipse's peak at 9:16:21 a.m. AKDT.

Here's what it will look like in Nashville, according to Vox:

An infographic of the Moon's passage across the Sun over time.

The graphic makes it look like the sky will be quite dark even in Alaska, but that won't really be the case. In the path of the total eclipse, it will get dark and you'll be able to see a few stars, but elsewhere, the partial eclipse will only change the color of the sky slightly. Even a little bit of Sun is still really bright.

Input your own ZIP code over at Vox, and don't forget to grab your eclipse glasses before you look up.

This Country Has the Most Expensive Beer in the World

iStock
iStock

Iceland may be more affordable than many other European destinations, but if you want to save money, don't spend too much time at the pub. That's because a bjór there will set you back $12.75, making it the world's most expensive destination for beer, according to an infographic created by UK-based appliance manufacturer Amica.

Using data from The Wall Street Journal and cost-of-living information from numbeo.com, Amica set out to determine how much beer you'd get in bars around the world for $1. In Iceland, apparently, it's not very much. For $1, you’ll receive 45ml, or “barely a sip,” as Amica puts it.

The high price of alcohol in Iceland has much to do with taxes. Alcohol is taxed by volume, so the state would collect 94.1 percent of a bottle’s retail price for a one-liter bottle of vodka priced at $66, according to Iceland Magazine. Next to Iceland, the most expensive countries to order a pint in are Norway, the United Arab Emirates, Israel, and France.

The U.S. isn’t significantly better off, though. On average, $1 will get you 83ml of beer, or about two shot glasses full. Of course, there are notable exceptions, depending on the quality of the beer and the type of establishment you find yourself in.

As for the cheapest countries for beer, Paraguay and Vietnam are your best bets, followed by Ethiopia, Ukraine, and Nigeria. In parts of Vietnam (primarily Hanoi), you can sit outdoors on a low plastic stool and order a type of fresh, preservative-free beer called bia hoi (literally “gas beer”), which sells for less than 50 cents per glass.

Check out Amica's infographic below, which uses a 568ml pint glass to help people visualize the amount of beer they'll get for a buck.

An infographic of beer prices around the world
Amica

Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book

TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN

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