The 9 Most Interesting Comics of July

Becky Cloonan/DC Comics
Becky Cloonan/DC Comics

Each month, we round up the most interesting comics, graphic novels, web and digital comics that we recommend you check out.

1. SHADE THE CHANGING GIRL VOL. 1: EARTH GIRL MADE EASY

By Cecil Castellucci, Marley Zarcone, Ande Parks, Ryan Kelly and Kelly Fitzpatrick
DC Comics Young Animal

Shade the Changing Girl
Marley Zarcone/DC Comics

 
While Gerard Way’s Doom Patrol is the headline act of DC’s new Young Animal imprint, the surprise hit has been Shade the Changing Girl, a modern, gender-swapped sequel of sorts to early DC Vertigo classic Shade the Changing Man, which itself was a re-imagining of a Steve Ditko creation from the 1970s. The Shade of this series is Loma Shade, an alien from the planet Meta who dumps her boyfriend and steals a “madness coat” that transports her to Earth and into the body of comatose teenage “mean girl” Megan Boyer. Loma is an Earth fan girl who is delighted to get to live in the culture she learned about from the radio transmissions of a 1950s TV show called Life with Honey, but 21st century Earth is not what Loma expected, and the reappearance of Megan puts a cramp in the style of a lot of people in her life that weren't expecting her back. Marley Zarcone’s psychedelic art and Cecil Castellucci’s knack for realistic teenage dialogue make this one of the freshest, most singular and interesting books of the year.

2. KAIJUMAX SEASON 3 #1

By Zander Cannon
Oni Press

Kaijumax
Zander Cannon/Oni Press

The beginning of the new “season” of Kaijumax follows on the large, scaly heels of season 2’s trade collection released last month. Zander Cannon’s smart prison satire may have started as a joke concept—Oz with goofy, rubber-suit-looking Kaiju monsters—but has turned out to be a surprisingly emotional read. Season 2 amped up the emotion when it moved off the giant-sized island prison to explore the lives of the human cops as well as the tragic post-prison lives of a parolee and an escapee. Season 3 returns to the prison, but looks as if it will retain that poignant, character-driven drama. This first issue focuses on a character who has become a fan favorite—the giant, sad goat monster known as the Creature from Devil’s Creek. Kaiju and obscure monster film aficionados will delight at the many references in this series, but anyone who appreciates a good prison drama will appreciate how well Cannon translates it to this unexpected setting. Despite the cute looking drawings, though, parents should be aware that this is not for kids.

3. THE WENDY PROJECT

By Melissa Jane Osborne and Veronica Fish
Super Genius/Papercutz  

The Wendy Project
Veronica Fish

In her first graphic novel, newcomer Melissa Jane Osborne uses art and J.M. Barrie’s classic Peter Pan as a storytelling device to explore how children cope with loss. The Wendy of this book, a teenager from a New England suburb, is the actual star of this story, rather than Peter, who is more like a rakishly handsome Charon, ferrying souls to the otherworldly Neverland. When she crashes her car into a lake with her two brothers in the back seat, the youngest, Michael, does not survive. To deal with her feelings about this tragedy, Wendy’s therapist gives her a sketchbook, which becomes the visual motif for artist Veronica Fish’s gorgeous art. While Osborne has written a touching and contemplative work, Fish has turned it into career-making work. Her use of vibrant splashes of color amidst mostly black and white sketches represents pieces of Neverland that work their way into Wendy’s reality, making this book feel as magical as it is melancholy.

4. BY CHANCE OR PROVIDENCE

By Becky Cloonan with Lee Loughridge
Image Comics

By Chance or Providence
Becky Cloonan/Image Comics

Back in 2011, Becky Cloonan began self-publishing what would become a trilogy of mini-comics—“Wolves,” “The Mire,” and “Demeter”—that would change the trajectory of her career from being a popular comics penciler to a writer/artist powerhouse and a self-publishing pioneer. While her mini-comics had just a limited print run, she managed to have the digital editions included in the launch of Comixology’s Submit platform for self-publishers where they became some of the most popular comics in the early days of that program. Now, for the first time, those three stories are being collected and released in wide print distribution with added colors by veteran colorist Lee Loughridge. Each story is a moody, sexy yet understated piece of supernatural fantasy with eerie twists that feel straight out of a classic EC horror comic.

5. MOONSTRUCK #1

By Grace Ellis, Shae Beagle, Kate Leth
Image Comics

Moonstruck
Shae Beagle

Fans and comic book sellers alike are hungry for more books like the wildly popular summer camp adventure Lumberjanes. Well, you can’t ask for better than a new comic from one of its creators that’s full of werewolves, gorgons, centaurs and more. Writer Grace Ellis brings a lot of Lumberjane’s progressive, girl-friendly and LGBTQ-friendly vibe to this new series about a couple of baristas in a world where everyone is part human, part mythological creature. Newcomer Shae Beagle’s comedic, animation-inspired art style should appeal to the teen and young adult readers this is made to please.

6. THE AMERICAN WAY: THOSE ABOVE AND THOSE BELOW #1

By John Ridley, Georges Jeanty, Danny Miki and Nick Filardi
DC Vertigo

The American Way
Georges Jeanty/DC Comics

Writer John Ridley returns to comics after a 10-year break during which he won an Academy Award for his screenplay for 12 Years A Slave and created the critically acclaimed television series American Crime. Specifically, he’s returning to The American Way, a comic mini-series he wrote in 2007 about a government-sponsored group of actors in the 1960s hired to fool the public into thinking they are real superheroes. When the government introduced The New American, an African-American with actual superpowers, into the group, it sparked racial strife among both the team and the public. In this new sequel, The New American and his colleagues have gone in separate directions and are caught up in the tumultuous political backdrop of the 1970s. Ridley, who is once again joined by artist Georges Jeanty, deals with racial violence, domestic terrorism, and the rising drug problem in America in this new series.

7. IMMORTAL IRON FISTS #1

By Kaare Andrews, Afu Chan and Shelly Chen
Marvel Comics

Immortal Iron Fists
Afu Chan/Marvel Comics

Back in May, Marvel gave a big boost to Comixology’s Unlimited subscription service by adding a portion of their catalog where readers can have “unlimited” access to those and a selection of titles from other publishers for $5.99 a month. Now, they are partnering with the service to produce exclusive content, free with an Unlimited subscription, beginning with this six-part series. Kaare Andrews recently completed a run as writer and artist on the solo Iron Fist title in which he introduced a pre-teen girl named Pei as the latest inheritor of the Iron Fist power. Now Andrews returns to continue Pei’s story, accompanied by up-and-coming artist Afu Chan. Danny Rand has brought Pei to New York from her devastated other dimensional home of K’un Lun to train her in the ways of the Iron Fist by making her face the most daunting challenge he can imagine: the NYC public school system. Andrews and Chan show a great knack for funny, human moments amidst all the dynamic kung fu action here.

8. SOLID STATE

By Jonathan Coulton, Matt Fraction and Albert Monteys
Image Comics

Solid State
Albert Monteys/Image Comics

Singer-songwriter Jonathan Coulton, known for writing folk-rock songs about internet and geek culture, recently released a concept album called Solid State. To accompany the album, he has written his first graphic novel of the same name, a sci-fi black comedy about technology, social media, privacy and the collapse of civilization. It is notable for Coulton’s choice in collaborators: Matt Fraction, the superstar writer of Sex Criminals and Satellite Sam, helps craft the story idea into a comic-ready script while Albert Monteys, the Spanish artist currently producing an astounding creator-owned comic called Universe for Brian K. Vaughan’s Panel Syndicate really makes it come alive. Hopefully, the star power of the two writers will result in some new readers discovering Monteys’ bright, colorful and fun artwork.

9. DUCK TALES #0

By Joe Caramagna, Paolo Campinoti, Gianfranco Florio, Andrea Greppi and Roberta Zanotta
IDW Publishing

Duck Tales
Paolo Campinoti/IDW Publishing

In advance of the Disney Channel’s new highly anticipated update of the popular ‘90s animated series Duck Tales comes a new comic that matches the modern, visual style of the new cartoon. This issue #0 is a preview of the new comic series which launches later this summer to coincide with the TV show and contains two stories both featuring Donald and his nephews, Huey, Duey and Louie. Even though Disney now owns Marvel Comics, IDW has been in charge of producing comics featuring characters like Mickey Mouse and Uncle Scrooge, who, along with Donald and the boys, have a long treasured history in comics thanks to the groundbreaking work of creators like Carl Barks and Don Rosa.

Finally: Avengers 4 Has a Title and a Trailer

Marvel Entertainment via YouTube
Marvel Entertainment via YouTube

After months of speculation as to when the first official trailer—and the title—would drop for the fourth film in the Avengers series, the time has come! Feast your eyes on Avengers: Endgame.

The trailer begins pretty bleak, as expected, as we see Tony Stark/Iron Man alone, reflecting on all the damage Thanos did in the previous film and all the friends he lost. We then see Steve Rogers/Captain America, Bruce Banner/The Hulk, and Natalia Romanova/Black Widow, similarly defeated after the events of Avengers: Infinity War and trying to pick up the remaining pieces. Hawkeye and Thor are also briefly shown.

However, the most exciting part of the trailer is no doubt the ending. We see Scott Lang/Ant-Man come to the front door, and the heroes ask if it was an old message they were seeing on their monitor, confused as to how they could see him. Black Widow confirms that it's happening right now, thus teasing Ant-Man using the Quantum Realm to time travel—an idea that one fan theory had already put forward. It's all the hope we need to know our heroes will likely all be brought back to life.

Avengers: End Game hits theaters on May 3, 2019.

Russo Brothers Reveal What Disney Thought of Avengers: Infinity War's Dark Ending

Chuck Zlotnick, Marvel Studios 2018
Chuck Zlotnick, Marvel Studios 2018

Disney movies always end in a happily ever after, right? Wrong. Avengers: Infinity War was released by the family-friendly Disney, but half of our favorite superheroes died in the last few minutes of the film.

Surprisingly, Anthony and Joe Russo, the film's directors, did not receive any pushback from Disney about the bleak finish, according to Deadline.

“They were incredibly encouraging of the choices we made,” Joe Russo said.

Anthony Russo explained that he and his brother have never planned to stick to the happy ending narrative when it comes to the Avengers series.

“The only way to drive a conversation is to surprise people,” Anthony said. “If you’re constantly adhering to convention, you’re not going to surprise people.”

Perfectly mastered plot twists create “pop culture talking points for an audience, but they’re also just good narrative,” he added.

The Russo brothers also discussed what the possible influx of new characters and A-list talent could mean for the Marvel Cinematic Universe if and when the Disney-Fox merger is finalized. The deal will introduce Deadpool and the X-Men into the MCU.

"The acquisition of Fox is showing us where the future of the business is going to go,” Joe Russo said, adding that while the brothers have talked to Disney CEO Bob Iger about the future of the MCU, “We haven’t talked to him about when he is going to do it."

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