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17 Little-Known Facts About Max Planck

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

These days, Max Planck’s name comes up most by way of the prestigious scientific institutes named after him. (The Max Planck Society runs 83 throughout Germany and the world.) But who was the real Max Planck, and why would there be so many research centers in his name? Here are 17 facts about the theoretical physicist.

1. HE CREATED ONE OF THE PILLARS OF MODERN PHYSICS.

There are two theories that modern physics uses to explain the universe. There is relativity—Einstein’s work—and there is quantum theory, invented by Planck. In the late 1890s, he began his work studying thermal radiation and found a formula for black-body radiation, one that eventually became Planck’s Law. To explain why his formula worked, he introduced the idea of packets of energy he called “quanta,” giving rise to the branch of quantum physics.

He himself was surprised at the radical nature of his own discoveries, writing, “My futile attempts to put the elementary quantum of action into the classical theory continued for a number of years and they cost me a great deal of effort.”

By the time he died, though, Planck was a legend in the scientific world. “Max Planck was one of the intellectual giants of the 20th century and one of the outstanding intellects of all time,” The New York Times wrote upon his death in October 1947, ranking “with the immortals of science, such as Archimedes, Galileo, Newton, and Einstein.”

2. AND HE HELPED NAME THE OTHER ONE.

Planck helped popularize the term “theory” to describe Einstein’s relativity work. In a 1906 talk, he referred to the model of physics put forth by Einstein as “Relativtheorie,” which became “Relativitätstheorie,” or “relativity theory.” Einstein himself referred to it as the “relativity principle,” but Planck’s terminology caught on.

3. HE WON A NOBEL.

Planck was a highly respected academic in his lifetime. As science writer Barbara Lovett Cline explains, “In Germany at this time only princes and barons were accorded more respect than professors,” and Planck was no exception. He racked up a multitude of awards in his academic career before finally winning the Nobel Prize in Physics at the age of 60. He received more nominations for the Nobel from a wider range of physicists than any other candidate at the time. He finally received the prize for 1918 “in recognition of [his] epoch-making investigations into the quantum theory,” as the president of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said upon presenting the award.

4. HE WAS ONE OF EINSTEIN’S EARLIEST SUPPORTERS.

Planck recognized the importance of Einstein’s work on relativity early, and was one of the first important boosters of his theories. “Einstein may be considered Planck’s second great discovery in physics,” J.L. Heilbron writes in his book The Dilemmas of an Upright Man: Max Planck as a Spokesman for German Science, “and his support, in Einstein’s judgment, was instrumental in securing the swift acceptance of new ideas among physicists.” At the time, Einstein didn’t have a Ph.D. or work at a university, and the support of an established, famous scientist like Planck helped usher him into the mainstream. Though he would remain skeptical of aspects of the younger scientist’s work—like his 1915 research on “light quanta,” or photons—the two remained friends and close colleagues for much of their lives. According to Planck’s obituary in The New York Times, “When the Physical Society of Berlin conferred on him a special medal, he handed a duplicate of it to his friend, Einstein.”

5. HE WAS A GREAT MUSICIAN.

Planck was a gifted pianist and almost dedicated his career to music instead of physics. He hosted musical salons at his home, inviting other physicists and academics as well as professional musicians. Albert Einstein attended [PDF], sometimes picking up the violin to play in quartets or trios with Planck. According to Heilbron, “Planck’s sense of pitch was so perfect that he could scarcely enjoy a concert,” lest it be ruined by an off-key note.

6. A PROFESSOR WARNED HIM NOT TO GO INTO PHYSICS.

Not long after the 16-year-old Planck got to the University of Munich in 1874, physics professor Philipp von Jolly tried to dissuade the young student from going into theoretical physics. Jolly argued that other scientists had basically figured out all there was to know. “In this field, almost everything is already discovered, and all that remains is to fill a few holes,” he told Planck. Luckily, the budding scientist ignored his advice.

7. HIS LECTURES WERE STANDING-ROOM-ONLY.

Though he was described as a bit dry in front of a classroom, Planck’s students loved him. English chemist James Partington said he was “the best lecturer [he] ever heard,” describing Planck’s lectures as crowded, popular affairs. “There were always many standing around the room,” according to Partington. “As the lecture-room was well heated and rather close, some of the listeners would from time to time drop to the floor, but this did not disturb the lecture.”

8. HE KEPT A STRICT SCHEDULE.

In The Dilemmas of an Upright Man, Heilbron describes Planck as an “exact economist with his time.” He ate breakfast precisely at 8 a.m then worked in a flurry until noon every day. In the evenings and during university breaks, though, he relaxed and entertained friends. His routine involved “a rigid schedule during term—writing and lecturing in the morning, lunch, rest, piano, walk, correspondence—and equally unrelenting recreation—mountain climbing without stopping or talking and Alpine accommodation without comfort or privacy,” according to Heilbron.

9. HE WAS A LIFELONG MOUNTAIN CLIMBER.

Planck stayed active throughout his life, hiking and mountain climbing well into old age. In his 80s, he still regularly climbed Alpine peaks reaching more than 9800 feet in height.

10. HE WAS PRETTY GOOD AT TAG.

“Planck loved merry, relaxed company and his home was the center of such conviviality,” famed nuclear physicist Lise Meitner described in 1958 (as quoted by the Max Planck Society). “When the invitations happened to be during the summer term, there would be energetic games in the garden afterwards in which Planck participated with downright childish glee and great adeptness. It was almost impossible not to be tagged by him. And how visibly pleased he was when he had caught someone!"

11. THE GESTAPO INVESTIGATED HIM DURING WORLD WAR II.

Due to his outspoken support of Jewish physicists like Einstein, Planck was labeled by the nationalist Aryan Physics faction of academics as being part of a grand Jewish conspiracy to keep German scientists from appointments in university physics departments Along with other physicists in Einstein’s circle, he was called a “bacteria carrier” and a “white Jew” in the official SS newspaper, Das Schwarze Korps, and his ancestry was investigated by the Gestapo.

12. HE PERSONALLY ASKED HITLER TO LET JEWISH SCIENTISTS KEEP THEIR JOBS.

Though Planck didn’t always support his Jewish colleagues against the Nazis—he chastised Einstein for not returning to Germany after Hitler came to power and eventually dismissed Jewish members of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (later the Max Planck Society) due to pressure from the Third Reich [PDF]—he did make several stands against Nazi policies. He fought against the inclusion of Nazi party members in the Prussian Academy and, as president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, met with Hitler and appealed to the Führer to let certain Jewish scientists keep their jobs.

It didn't work. In 1935, one in five German scientists had been dismissed from their posts (as many as one in four in the field of physics) and supporting Jewish scientists became increasingly risky. Still, in 1935, Planck convened a commemorative meeting of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society to honor the late Jewish chemist Fritz Haber despite an explicit government ban on attending the event. His prominent support of Jewish scientists like Haber and Einstein and refusal to join the Nazi Party eventually resulted in the government forcing him out of his position at the Prussian Academy of Sciences and blocking him from receiving certain professional awards.

13. BUT HE HAD A COMPLICATED RELATIONSHIP WITH THE NAZIS.

He was one of many apolitical civil servants in German academia who hoped that the worst effects of anti-Semitic nationalism would eventually pass, and who wanted to maintain Germany’s importance on the world scientific stage as much as possible in the meantime. When Hitler began demanding that speeches open with “Heil Hitler,” Planck begrudgingly complied. As physicist Paul Ewald described of his address at the opening of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Metals in the 1930s, “… we were all staring at Planck, waiting to see what he would do at the opening, because at that time it was prescribed officially that you had to open such addresses with ‘Heil Hitler.’ Well, Planck stood on the rostrum and lifted his hand half high, and let it sink again. He did it a second time. Then finally the hand came up and he said ‘Heil Hitler.’ … Looking back, it was the only thing you could do if you didn’t want to jeopardize the whole [Kaiser Wilhelm Society].” As science writer Philip Ball describes, for Planck, the rise of Hitler and Nazi Germany was a “catastrophe that had engulfed him, and which in the end destroyed him.”

14. HIS SON WAS LINKED TO A PLOT TO ASSASSINATE HITLER.

Erwin Planck was a high-ranking government official before the Nazis came to power, and although he resigned from political life in 1933, he secretly helped craft a constitution for a post-Nazi government. In 1944, he was arrested and accused of taking part in Claus Stauffenberg’s assassination attempt on Adolf Hitler, in which the Nazi leader was wounded by an exploding briefcase. While it seems that Erwin didn’t directly take part in the bombing plot, he did recruit supporters for the conspirators, and he was sentenced to death for treason. Trying to save his favorite son’s life, the 87-year-old Max Planck wrote personal letters begging for clemency to both Hitler and the head of the SS, Heinrich Himmler. Erwin was executed in 1945.

15. HIS MOTTO WAS “PERSEVERE AND CONTINUE WORKING.”

After World War I, Planck encouraged his fellow scientists to ignore the turbulence of politics to focus on the greater importance of their scientific achievements. “Persevere and continue working” was his slogan.

16. HE CALLED PHYSICS “THE MOST SUBLIME SCIENTIFIC PURSUIT IN LIFE.”

In his autobiography, Planck described why he chose to pursue physics. “The outside world is something independent from man, something absolute, and the quest for the laws which apply to this absolute appeared to me as the most sublime scientific pursuit in life,” he wrote.

17. THERE ARE MANY THINGS NAMED AFTER HIM.

Several discoveries by Planck were eventually named after him, including Planck’s law, Planck’s constant (h, or 6.62607004 × 10^-34 joule-seconds), and Planck units. There is the Planck era (the first stage of the Big Bang), the Planck particle (a tiny black hole), the lunar crater Planck, and the European Space Agency spacecraft Planck, among others. Not to mention the Max Planck Society and its 83 Max Planck Institutes.

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Penn Vet Working Dog Center
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Stones, Bones, and Wrecks
New Program Trains Dogs to Sniff Out Art Smugglers
Penn Vet Working Dog Center
Penn Vet Working Dog Center

Soon, the dogs you see sniffing out contraband at airports may not be searching for drugs or smuggled Spanish ham. They might be looking for stolen treasures.

K-9 Artifact Finders, a new collaboration between New Hampshire-based cultural heritage law firm Red Arch and the University of Pennsylvania, is training dogs to root out stolen antiquities looted from archaeological sites and museums. The dogs would be stopping them at borders before the items can be sold elsewhere on the black market.

The illegal antiquities trade nets more than $3 billion per year around the world, and trafficking hits countries dealing with ongoing conflict, like Syria and Iraq today, particularly hard. By one estimate, around half a million artifacts were stolen from museums and archaeological sites throughout Iraq between 2003 and 2005 alone. (Famously, the craft-supply chain Hobby Lobby was fined $3 million in 2017 for buying thousands of ancient artifacts looted from Iraq.) In Syria, the Islamic State has been known to loot and sell ancient artifacts including statues, jewelry, and art to fund its operations.

But the problem spans across the world. Between 2007 and 2016, U.S. Customs and Border Control discovered more than 7800 cultural artifacts in the U.S. looted from 30 different countries.

A yellow Lab sniffs a metal cage designed to train dogs on scent detection.
Penn Vet Working Dog Center

K-9 Artifact Finders is the brainchild of Rick St. Hilaire, the executive director of Red Arch. His non-profit firm researches cultural heritage property law and preservation policy, including studying archaeological site looting and antiquities trafficking. Back in 2015, St. Hilaire was reading an article about a working dog trained to sniff out electronics that was able to find USB drives, SD cards, and other data storage devices. He wondered, if dogs could be trained to identify the scents of inorganic materials that make up electronics, could they be trained to sniff out ancient pottery?

To find out, St. Hilaire tells Mental Floss, he contacted the Penn Vet Working Dog Center, a research and training center for detection dogs. In December 2017, Red Arch, the Working Dog Center, and the Penn Museum (which is providing the artifacts to train the dogs) launched K-9 Artifact Finders, and in late January 2018, the five dogs selected for the project began their training, starting with learning the distinct smell of ancient pottery.

“Our theory is, it is a porous material that’s going to have a lot more odor than, say, a metal,” says Cindy Otto, the executive director of the Penn Vet Working Dog Center and the project’s principal investigator.

As you might imagine, museum curators may not be keen on exposing fragile ancient materials to four Labrador retrievers and a German shepherd, and the Working Dog Center didn’t want to take any risks with the Penn Museum’s priceless artifacts. So instead of letting the dogs have free rein to sniff the materials themselves, the project is using cotton balls. The researchers seal the artifacts (broken shards of Syrian pottery) in airtight bags with a cotton ball for 72 hours, then ask the dogs to find the cotton balls in the lab. They’re being trained to disregard the smell of the cotton ball itself, the smell of the bag it was stored in, and ideally, the smell of modern-day pottery, eventually being able to zero in on the smell that distinguishes ancient pottery specifically.

A dog looks out over the metal "pinhweel" training mechanism.
Penn Vet Working Dog Center

“The dogs are responding well,” Otto tells Mental Floss, explaining that the training program is at the stage of "exposing them to the odor and having them recognize it.”

The dogs involved in the project were chosen for their calm-but-curious demeanors and sensitive noses (one also works as a drug-detection dog when she’s not training on pottery). They had to be motivated enough to want to hunt down the cotton balls, but not aggressive or easily distracted.

Right now, the dogs train three days a week, and will continue to work on their pottery-detection skills for the first stage of the project, which the researchers expect will last for the next nine months. Depending on how the first phase of the training goes, the researchers hope to be able to then take the dogs out into the field to see if they can find the odor of ancient pottery in real-life situations, like in suitcases, rather than in a laboratory setting. Eventually, they also hope to train the dogs on other types of objects, and perhaps even pinpoint the chemical signatures that make artifacts smell distinct.

Pottery-sniffing dogs won’t be showing up at airport customs or on shipping docks soon, but one day, they could be as common as drug-sniffing canines. If dogs can detect low blood sugar or find a tiny USB drive hidden in a house, surely they can figure out if you’re smuggling a sculpture made thousands of years ago in your suitcase.

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Medicine
New Cancer-Fighting Nanobots Can Track Down Tumors and Cut Off Their Blood Supply
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iStock

Scientists have developed a new way to cut off the blood flow to cancerous tumors, causing them to eventually shrivel up and die. As Business Insider reports, the new treatment uses a design inspired by origami to infiltrate crucial blood vessels while leaving the rest of the body unharmed.

A team of molecular chemists from Arizona State University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences describe their method in the journal Nature Biotechnology. First, they constructed robots that are 1000 times smaller than a human hair from strands of DNA. These tiny devices contain enzymes called thrombin that encourage blood clotting, and they're rolled up tightly enough to keep the substance contained.

Next, researchers injected the robots into the bloodstreams of mice and small pigs sick with different types of cancer. The DNA sought the tumor in the body while leaving healthy cells alone. The robot knew when it reached the tumor and responded by unfurling and releasing the thrombin into the blood vessel that fed it. A clot started to form, eventually blocking off the tumor's blood supply and causing the cancerous tissues to die.

The treatment has been tested on dozen of animals with breast, lung, skin, and ovarian cancers. In mice, the average life expectancy doubled, and in three of the skin cancer cases tumors regressed completely.

Researchers are optimistic about the therapy's effectiveness on cancers throughout the body. There's not much variation between the blood vessels that supply tumors, whether they're in an ovary in or a prostate. So if triggering a blood clot causes one type of tumor to waste away, the same method holds promise for other cancers.

But before the scientists think too far ahead, they'll need to test the treatments on human patients. Nanobots have been an appealing cancer-fighting option to researchers for years. If effective, the machines can target cancer at the microscopic level without causing harm to healthy cells. But if something goes wrong, the bots could end up attacking the wrong tissue and leave the patient worse off. Study co-author Hao Yan believes this latest method may be the one that gets it right. He said in a statement, "I think we are much closer to real, practical medical applications of the technology."

[h/t Business Insider]

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