And Now, the Weather (On Mars)

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Mars rover engineers have begun publishing regular reports on the red planet's frigid climate, dust devils, and wild winds.

The Spanish scientists behind the rover Curiosity's onboard weather station—the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station, or REMS—say they want to keep ordinary folks apprised of what they're learning.

REMS instruments measure surrounding air temperature, ground temperature, wind speed, air pressure, dust levels, and circulation, allowing scientists to develop a pretty good picture of what's going on up there.

Illustration of the Curiosity rover on the Martian surface.

Martian weathermen Jorge Pla-García, Antonio Molina, and Javier Gómez Elvira of the Spanish National Center of Astrobiology analyze the enormous influx of data and translate it into reports that feel both alien and very familiar to readers of the morning newspaper.

Spring, for example, is dust season. "Dust is highly influential in the Martian atmosphere, causing most of its variability," the team writes in their July 2017 report. "The suspended dust particles have a double effect, retaining the infrared radiation coming from the ground but reflexing the incident visible radiation, providing an anti-greenhouse effect in this case. Because of that, nighttime temperature rises, while the daytime temperature decreases."

Weather superfans (we know you're out there) can download the REMS app for regular updates on Martian cloud cover, radiation index, and sunrise and sunset times. The reports offer more in-depth analysis of how these conditions came about and what they can tell us about our dry, chilly cosmic neighbor.

While it may not involve standing in the path of a hurricane, interplanetary weather watching can still be hard on its practitioners.

"We used to be on watch on Martian time," Pla-García told Atlas Obscura. "And a Martian day is 24 hours and 39 minutes long, so our work schedule was different every day. That included weekends, New Year's Eve, Thanksgiving, you name it."

The team has since transitioned to Earthling time. But that doesn't mean they're loafing on the job.

"We do it because it's the public's right," Pla-García says. "They fund us with their taxes, so they deserve to know what their money is being spent on!"

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

A Simple Trick for Defrosting Your Windshield in Less Than 60 Seconds

iStock
iStock

As beautiful as a winter snowfall can be, the white stuff is certainly not without its irritations—especially if you have to get into your car and go somewhere. As if shoveling a path to the driver’s door wasn’t enough, then you’ve got a frozen windshield with which to contend. Everyone has his or her own tricks for warming up a car in record time—including appropriately-named meteorologist Ken Weathers, who works at WATE in Knoxville, Tennessee.

A while back, Weathers shared a homemade trick for defrosting your windshield in less than 60 seconds: spray the glass with a simple solution of one part water and two parts rubbing alcohol. “The reason why this works,” according to Weathers, “is [that] rubbing alcohol has a freezing point of 128 degrees below freezing.”

Watch the spray in action below.

[h/t: Travel + Leisure]

Website Lets You Report Individuals Affected by Hurricane Michael to Search-and-Rescue Teams

Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images
Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images

When Hurricane Michael made landfall in Florida as a Category 4 hurricane on October 10, it became the strongest storm to hit the continental U.S. since 1992. Homes from Florida to Virginia have since been leveled and at least 11 people have died. With internet and phone lines down across the disaster zone, many people are desperate to know if their loved ones are safe—now there's an online tool that can help them.

If you're having trouble getting in touch with someone who was in the hurricane's path, you can report them through a new website set up by the Florida National Guard, First Coast News reports. The site asks for the person's name, gender, age, and address, as well as any life-threatening issues they may be facing, such as low oxygen or medication supplies. After you submit their information, the State Emergency Operations Center forwards it to the relevant local agency doing recovery work.

Michael moved back over the Atlantic as a post-tropical storm Friday morning following its rampage through the southeastern U.S. More than 1000 search-and-rescue workers have already been deployed in Florida alone, and the death toll is expected to rise as clean-up efforts continue across the region.

[h/t First Coast News]

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