This 90-Year-Old Has Knitted More Than 2000 Hats for Newborn Babies

Courtesy Cleveland Clinic
Courtesy Cleveland Clinic

Since 2009, 90-year-old Barbara Lowe has been a fixture at Hillcrest Hospital outside Cleveland, but she's not a patient. Almost a decade ago, the Mayfield Heights, Ohio, resident took it upon herself to begin knitting tiny hats for newborn babies delivered at Hillcrest, and has now delivered 2252 hats and counting, according to ABC News.

Lowe lives in a senior living complex across the street from the hospital, so it was an easy jump to go from whipping up hats for the children of her family and friends to delivering teeny headgear to the maternity ward.

Seven pastel knit caps lie on a wooden table.
Courtesy Cleveland Clinic

Using fine baby yarns, Lowe makes ribbed hats with a brim and a detachable flower, spending around four hours on each one. They come in a variety of pastel colors. Lowe is known around town for her work with the hospital, and the manager at the Michaels store she buys her supplies from gives her a discount on the yarn she uses for hospital caps.

"It's my therapy," Lowe told ABC News. "When you're 90, you've got aches and pains. You don't want to think about it. Well, you're not thinking about it if you're concentrating on what you're doing."

Lowe learned to crochet and sew as a child, and later taught herself to knit. She considers it a "dream" to be able to give back to her community by gifting the hats to new parents and their bundles of warm-headed joy. According to the hospital, the hats do more than just keep babies toasty after their first bath—they provide a teaching opportunity to help new parents learn how to keep their babies feeling warm, as a hospital official told Cleveland.com.

[h/t ABC News]

Behr Will Pay Someone $10,000 to Travel the U.S. and Canada in Search of New Paint Colors

Rainbow Row in Charleston, South Carolina
Rainbow Row in Charleston, South Carolina
iStock.com/RiverNorthPhotography

Want to add a bit of color and excitement to your life? Behr has just the opportunity for you. The company wants to pay a “Color Explorer” $10,000 to visit vibrant destinations across the U.S. and Canada in search of new hues that will ultimately be turned into actual Behr paints.

“The Behr Color Explorer will kayak the glacial blues of Lake Louise in Banff [Alberta, Canada], people-watch at a vibrant music festival, take in the bold exteriors of Charleston’s Rainbow Row, and experience many more moments of positively pigmented wanderlust in between,” Behr writes in its job description.

Throughout their trip, the Color Explorer will take field notes and plenty of photos, and document their experiences on Behr’s blog and social media. After seeing all there is to see, this person will head to the company’s headquarters in Orange County, California, to work with Behr's marketing team on naming the new colors they uncovered.

Behr's paint names tend to range from the alliterative (see: “Bali Bliss” and “Barely Brown”) to the poetic (“Moth’s Wing”) to the straightforward but still somehow evocative (“Wheat Bread” and “Swiss Coffee”). The company's color of the year for 2019 is called Blueprint.

The ideal Color Explorer will be adventurous, interested in color, and knowledgeable about the latest trends, according to Behr.

In addition to providing a $10,000 stipend, the company will also cover all travel expenses, accommodation, and experiences. Would-be explorers can apply for the gig on Behr’s website by writing a short description of the color that inspires them most before the May 15 deadline. Applicants must be at least 21 years old and residents of the U.S. or Canada, and they must also have a valid passport.

Connecticut Bill Will Make Baby Changing Tables Accessible to Both Women and Men

iStock.com/tzahiV
iStock.com/tzahiV

Most parents know how hard it is to bring infants out in public, but dads face an extra challenge when it's time to change their kids' diapers. If buildings do provide baby changing stations, they're usually limited to women's restrooms, leaving male parents in a difficult situation if they want to perform a basic act of childcare outside their home. As NBC Connecticut reports, Connecticut is the latest state to fight this trend with a bill that mandates changing stations in all new restrooms regardless of gender.

If the bill is passed, it will require that diaper changing stations be made accessible to both women and men in all newly built or substantially renovated public or commercial buildings with one or more public bathroom. The state's Senate voted 34-2 in favor of the bill on April 17, but it still needs approval from Connecticut's House of Representatives before it becomes law.

In addition to helping single dads and dads who share childcare responsibilities with their female partners, Democratic Senator Will Haskell says the bill would also make life easier for gay couples with children. Without such laws, men are often forced to changed their kid's diapers on floors, benches, or counters.

If Connecticut passes the bill, it will join New York in requiring changing tables in all new public restrooms. Thanks to a law signed by President Obama in 2016, changing tables are also mandatory in federal buildings open to the public.

[h/t NBC Connecticut]

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