15 Memorable Quotes from George A. Romero

Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images
Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images

Hollywood has lost one of its most iconic horror innovators with the death of George A. Romero, who passed away on Sunday at the age of 77. “He died peacefully in his sleep, following a brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer, and leaves behind a loving family, many friends, and a filmmaking legacy that has endured, and will continue to endure, the test of time,” his manager, Chris Roe, said in a statement.

Though he rose to prominence as the master of zombie flicks, beginning with Night of the Living Dead, Romero honed his filmmaking skills on a far less frightening set: shooting bits for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

“I still joke that 'Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy' is the scariest film I’ve ever made,” Romero once said. “What I really mean is that I was scared sh*tless while I was trying to pull it off.” (Rogers returned the favor by being a longtime champion of Romero’s work—and even called Dawn of the Dead “a lot of fun.”)

It’s that high-spirited sense of fun that made Romero’s work so iconic—and kept the New York City native busy for nearly 50 years. To celebrate his life and career, here are 15 of his most memorable quotes on everything from the humanity of zombies to the horror of Hollywood producers.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A SENSE OF HUMOR

“For a Catholic kid in parochial school, the only way to survive the beatings—by classmates, not the nuns—was to be the funny guy.”

ON THE HOLLYWOOD WAY

“If I fail, the film industry writes me off as another statistic. If I succeed, they pay me a million bucks to fly out to Hollywood and fart.”

ON BEING PIGEONHOLED

“As a filmmaker you get typecast just as much as an actor does, so I'm trapped in a genre that I love, but I'm trapped in it!”

ON ZOMBIES AS A METAPHOR

“I also have always liked the monster within idea. I like the zombies being us. Zombies are the blue-collar monsters.”

ON FINDING OBJECTIVITY AS A FILMMAKER

“There are so many factors when you think of your own films. You think of the people you worked on it with, and somehow forget the movie. You can't forgive the movie for a long time. It takes a few years to look at it with any objectivity and forgive its flaws.”

ON THE REAL VALUE OF THE INTERNET

“What the Internet's value is that you have access to information but you also have access to every lunatic that's out there that wants to throw up a blog.”

ON THE HORROR OF DEALING WITH PRODUCERS

“I'll never get sick of zombies. I just get sick of producers.”

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF COLLABORATION

“Collaborate, don’t dictate.”

ON THE BEAUTY OF LOW-BUDGET MOVIEMAKING

“I don't think you need to spend $40 million to be creepy. The best horror films are the ones that are much less endowed.”

ON HUMANS BEING THE REAL VILLAINS

“My zombies will never take over the world because I need the humans. The humans are the ones I dislike the most, and they're where the trouble really lies.”

ON BEING IMMUNE TO TRENDS

“Somehow I've been able to keep standing and stay in my little corner and do my little stuff and I'm not particularly affected by trends or I'm not dying to make a 3-D movie or anything like that. I'm just sort of happy to still be around.”

ON THE HUMANITY OF HORROR

“My stories are about humans and how they react, or fail to react, or react stupidly. I'm pointing the finger at us, not at the zombies. I try to respect and sympathize with the zombies as much as possible.”

ON THE ENDURING APPEAL OF HORROR

“If one horror film hits, everyone says, 'Let's go make a horror film.' It's the genre that never dies.”

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF SURROUNDING ZOMBIES WITH STUPID PEOPLE

“A zombie film is not fun without a bunch of stupid people running around and observing how they fail to handle the situation.”

ON LIFE AFTER DEATH

“I'm like my zombies. I won't stay dead!”

DC's Penguin Rumored to Be Main Villain in The Batman

ABC Television, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
ABC Television, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Little information about Matt Reeves’s The Batman has been released, but a new report by We Got This Covered claims that Oswald Cobblepot, otherwise known as the Penguin, will be one of the main villains in the upcoming film.

Fans have been excited about this rumor since last year, when celebrities such as Josh Gad took notice. Gad took to Twitter at the time to throw his hat in the ring for the role of the Penguin.

Despite the actor’s enthusiasm, it remains unknown who will actually don the Penguin’s iconic top hat for the part. The report states that Reeves requested the Penguin not appear in the upcoming Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of Harley Quinn), which will be released in February 2020.

This rumor lines up with previous ones that named the Penguin as a very possible choice for the film’s main antagonist. Last May, Variety’s Justin Kroll reported he was “hearing the Penguin is possibly the choice to play the main villain” in the highly anticipated film.

Last month, rumors swirled that Warner Bros. was eyeing Jonah Hill for the role after Reeves and Birds of Prey star Margot Robbie both followed Hill on social media. Nick Frost and Andy Serkis have also been rumored as possible choices.

Adding to all the speculation, Gad again took to Twitter to tease the role, either hinting he has been cast as the Penguin, or just reiterating his desire to play him.

Reeves has kept fans in the dark during the development stages of the The Batman. "There are ways in which all of this connects to DC, to the DC universe as well," Reeves said last year. "We’re one piece of many pieces so I don’t want to comment on that except to say that I’m focused very specifically on this aspect of the DC world."

If rumors claiming that The Batman will begin filming in November are true, more information about the cast should be revealed in the coming months.

Marvel Timeline Shows That The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man 2, and Thor Took Place in One Week

Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures

Comic book fans are aware that the Marvel Cinematic Universe is a shared one, where events that happen in our favorite superheroes' lives happen in the same world. But what some of even the most diehard Marvel fans might not know is that some pretty major MCU events have actually happened at the very same time. In fact, the events of The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man 2, and Thor all took place within the same week.

An old infographic from The Art of Marvel’s The Avengers depicts the timelines of all six individual Avengers movies in extreme detail, going so far as to break down each week into day and night, clearly explaining when and how each moment took place.

Day one starts off with S.H.I.E.L.D. monitoring Bruce Banner, Tony Stark, and Jane Foster, and ends with Stark and James Rhodes battling it out in Stark’s Malibu mansion.

The infographic shows that within the same week of Stark Expo exploding in Queens, the Incredible Hulk took on the Abomination in Harlem in what came to be known as the "Duel of Harlem," Asgard was attacked, and the tiny town of Puente Antiguo, New Mexico was demolished.

The time period—which ends with the Hulk defeating the Abomination and is known as “Fury’s Big Week” (though it's a pretty busy one for S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Coulson, too)—is one of the busiest weeks in the entire history of the MCU, and leads up to the key moment where the Avengers Assemble!

Avengers: Endgame, the final film in the Avengers series, will arrive in theaters on April 26, 2019.

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