10 Totally Awesome Facts About David Hasselhoff

Mark Mainz/Getty Images
Mark Mainz/Getty Images

Over the span of more than 40 years, David Hasselhoff—a.k.a. The Hoff—has inspired the world with his roles on The Young and the Restless, Knight Rider, Baywatch (the show, Baywatch Nights, and the recent movie) and also with his music career, which helped reunite Germany soon after the Berlin Wall fell. His self-deprecating humor has led to a variety of cameos (playing himself) in movies like Dodgeball, Killing Hasselhoff, and this year’s Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. To celebrate The Hoff's career—and his 65th birthday—here are some things you might not have known about the beloved pop culture icon.

1. HE BEGAN HIS MOVIE CAREER MAKING B-MOVIES.

In the 1970s, The Hoff had a thriving TV career playing Dr. William "Snapper" Foster on The Young and the Restless, but before he started talking to a car named KITT, his movie career was slowly taking off. According to IMDb, his first movie role was a guy named Boner in the 1976 movie Revenge of the Cheerleaders. Two years later he played Christopher Plummer’s son in the cult space opera Starcrash. In 1988, in a period between Knight Rider and Baywatch, Hasselhoff starred in the not-so-good horror film Witchery. Thank God Baywatch came along.

2. HE’S IN THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS FOR TWO ACHIEVEMENTS.

The Guinness Book of World Records anointed Hasselhoff the title of "The World’s Most Watched Man on Television" because of Baywatch’s more than 1 billion viewers in 140 countries. In 2011, Hugh Laurie took the title away from Hasselhoff, but in June of the same year The Hoff won another title: the highest height a human was catapulted using a reverse bungee system. He was thrown nearly 230 feet at London’s Battersea Power Station.

3. HE SAYS BAYWATCH’S SLO-MO SCENES DEVELOPED FROM A LACK OF FUNDS.

Much of Baywatch's popularity can be attributed to its frequent tendency to show its characters' bouncy body parts running in slow-motion—a camera technique that developed from a lack of money. “We didn’t have enough financing to finish the show,” Hassehoff told Men’s Health. “So we found a way to fill the hour by shooting people in slow motion. We said, ‘Well, girls in bathing suits look good running in slow motion, let’s just shoot that.’ And we found out that the audience kinda liked it.”

4. HE PLAYS A VERSION OF HIMSELF IN HOFF THE RECORD.

The British mockumentary series follows The Hoff as he tries to resurrect his career in England. The show premiered in 2015 and aired for two seasons (it’s available on Netflix). He wants people to watch the International Emmy Award-winning comedy so much that at a premiere for Baywatch the movie he kept mentioning the show to everyone he encountered. “I only got in a mention of the show about 10 times,” he told the Los Angeles Times. “I was so overwhelmed at the beginning I forgot about it.”

5. WE HAVE AUSTRALIA TO THANK FOR "DON'T HASSLE THE HOFF."

Fifteen years ago, Hasselhoff found out secretaries in Australia were sending each other emails with puns on The Hoff (a.k.a “Hoffisms”) such as Some Like It Hoff, the Wizard of Hoff, Desperate Hoffwives. “I got an email from one of these women, asking me, ‘How does it feel to be a sex symbol at 50?’” he told Men’s Health. He thought the puns were funny, and went on television in Australia. “I was talking about the whole phenomenon and I said, like I was talking to the secretaries, ‘I have a saying for you: Don’t hassle the Hoff!’ And that’s when it all blew up and went crazy.”

6. HE WAS BIG IN AUSTRIA BEFORE HE BECAME A SUPERSTAR IN GERMANY.

During a low period for The Hoff in the mid-’80s—Knight Rider had been canceled, and he was going through a divorce—he received a phone call that a woman from Austria had won a contest to have lunch with him. He met with the girl and she said to him, “‘You know, your [debut] record’s number one in my country,” Hasselhoff recalled. “And I was like, ‘Night RockerNight Rocker sold seven copies and I bought six.’ She said ‘No, no, Night Rocker is number one in Austria.’ I said, ‘Where’s Austria?’” He then booked a music tour of Europe. In 1989, his song “Looking for Freedom” topped the West German charts for eight weeks, and he performed the song on New Year’s Eve at the Berlin Wall, shortly after it fell.

7. HE'S A BROADWAY STAR.

In 2000, he played Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in the Broadway musical Jekyll and Hyde: The Musical. He also played Billy Flynn in Chicago, Roger De Bris in The Producers during its 2007 Vegas run, and a recurring role as Captain Hook in Peter Pan. In 2015, in Manchester, England, he performed in Last Night a DJ Saved My Life, a musical about Ibiza. Apparently, he’s big in England, too.

8. HE HOSTED TALK SHOWS IN SWEDEN AND FINLAND.

As if his international star status wasn’t already impressive enough, in 2014 he hosted a talk show, en svensk talk show, in Sweden. A year later he filmed 10 episodes of the Finland-based The David Hasselhoff Show.

9. SCIENTISTS NAMED A CRAB AFTER HIM.

In 2012, scientists discovered a new kind of crab, one with a hirsute chest—just like The Hoff. The scientists dubbed their Antarctic discovery "The Hoff Crab." The binomial name is Kiwa tyleri from the family Kiwaidae. The crab is a species of the squat lobster. “I think it's quite an honor to be named for a crab,” Hoff told Men’s Health. “It’s white and it’s got a hairy chest. I remember thinking, this Hoff thing is getting out of control.”

10. THIS NOVEMBER, YOU CAN CRUISE TO ITALY, FRANCE, AND SPAIN WITH THE HOFF.

The six-day David Hasselhoff – The Official World Fan Cruise sets sail on November 4, 2017. Travelers will cruise along the Mediterranean Sea with The Hoff, who will sign autographs and maybe sing to you. Pricing starts at about $900 (and tickets are still available).

7 Things You Might Not Know About Mario Lopez

Angela Weiss, Getty Images for Oakley
Angela Weiss, Getty Images for Oakley

While several of the actors featured in the 1990s young-adult series Saved by the Bell have fared well following the show’s end in 1994, Mario Lopez is in a class by himself. The versatile actor-emcee can be seen regularly on Extra, as host of innumerable beauty pageants, and as the author of several best-selling books on fitness. For more on Lopez, check out some of the more compelling facts we’ve rounded up on the multi-talented performer.

1. A WITCH DOCTOR SAVED HIS LIFE.

Born on October 10, 1973, in San Diego, California to parents Mario and Elvia Lopez, young Mario was initially the picture of health. But things quickly took a turn for the worse. In his 2014 autobiography, Just Between Us, Lopez wrote that he began having digestive problems immediately after birth, shrinking to just four pounds. Though doctors administered IV hydration, they told his parents nothing more could be done. Desperate, his father reached out to a witch doctor near Rosarito, Mexico who had cured his spinal ailments years earlier. The healer mixed a drink made of Pedialyte, Carnation evaporated milk, goat’s milk, and other unknown substances. It worked: Lopez kept it down and began growing, so much so that his mother declared him “the fattest baby you had ever seen in your life.”

2. HE STARTED ACTING AT 10.

A highly active kid who got involved in both tap and jazz dancing and amateur wrestling, Lopez was spotted by a talent scout during a dance competition at age 10 and was later cast in a sitcom, a.k.a. Pablo, in 1984. That led to a role in the variety show Kids Incorporated and in the 1988 Sean Penn feature film Colors. In 1989, at the age of 16, he won the role of Albert Clifford “A.C.” Slater in Saved by the Bell. By 1992, Lopez was making public appearances at malls, where female fans would regularly toss their underthings in his direction.

3. HE COULD PROBABLY BEAT YOU UP.

Lopez wrestled as an amateur throughout high school. According to the Chula Vista High School Foundation, Lopez was a state placewinner at 189 pounds in 1990. (On Saved by the Bell, Slater was also a wrestler.) He later complemented his grappling ability with boxing, often sparring professionals like Jimmy Lange and Oscar De La Hoya in bouts for charity. In 2018, Lopez posted on Instagram that he received his blue belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu under Gracie Barra Glendale instructor Robert Hill.

4. HE TURNED DOWN PLAYGIRL.

Lopez’s active lifestyle has made for a trim physique, but he’s apparently unwilling to take off more than his shirt. In 2008, Lopez said he was approached to pose for Playgirl but declined. The magazine reportedly offered him $200,000.

5. HE WAS MARRIED FOR TWO WEEKS.

Lopez had a well-publicized marriage to actress Ali Landry, but not for all the right reasons. The two were married in April 2004 and split just two weeks later, with Landry alleging Lopez had not been faithful. Lopez later disclosed he had made a miscalculation during his bachelor party in Mexico, cheating on Landry just days before the ceremony.

6. HE APPEARED ON BROADWAY.

Lopez joined the cast of Broadway’s A Chorus Line in 2008, portraying Zach, the director who coaches the cast of aspiring dancers. (It was his first stage appearance since he participated in a grade school play, where he played a tree.) His run, which lasted five months, was perceived to be part of a rash of casting choices on Broadway revolving around hunky performers to attract audiences. The role was thought to be the start of a resurgence for Lopez, who had previously appeared on Dancing with the Stars and has been a co-host of the pop culture newsmagazine show Extra since 2007.

7. HE BELIEVES HIS DOG SUFFERED FROM POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION.

In 2010, Lopez and then-girlfriend (now wife) Courtney Mazza had their first child, Gia. According to Lopez, his French bulldog, Julio César Chavez Lopez, exhibited signs of depression following the new addition to the household. Lopez also said he used his extensive knowledge of dogs to better inform his voiceover work as a Labrador retriever in 2009’s The Dog Who Saved Christmas and 2010’s The Dog Who Saved Christmas Vacation.

The Legend of Cry Baby Lane: The Lost Nickelodeon Movie That Was Too Scary for TV

Nickelodeon, Viacom
Nickelodeon, Viacom

Several years ago, rumors about a lost Nickelodeon movie branded too disturbing for children’s television began popping up around the internet. They all referenced the same plot: A father of conjoined twins was so ashamed of his sons that he hid them away throughout their childhood. (This being a made-for-TV horror movie, naturally one of the twins was evil.)

After one twin got sick the other soon followed, with both boys eventually succumbing to the illness. To keep the town from discovering his secret, the father separated their bodies with a rusty saw and buried the good one at the local cemetery and the evil one at the end of a desolate dirt road called Cry Baby Lane, which also happened to be the title of the rumored film. According to the local undertaker, anyone who ventured down Cry Baby Lane after dark could hear the evil brother crying from beyond the grave.

Cry Baby Lane then jumps to present day (well, present day in 2000), where a group of teens sneaks into the local graveyard in an effort to contact the spirit of the good twin. After holding a seance, they learn that the boys' father had made a mistake and mixed up the bodies of his children—burying the good son at the end of Cry Baby Lane and the evil one in the cemetery. Meaning those ghostly wails were actually the good twin crying out for help. But the teens realized the error too late: The evil twin had already been summoned and quickly began possessing the local townspeople.

MOVIE OR MYTH?

Parents were appalled that such dark content ever made it onto the family-friendly network, or so the story goes, and after airing the film once the Saturday before Halloween in 2000, Nickelodeon promptly scrubbed it from existence. But with no video evidence of it online for years, some people questioned whether Cry Baby Lane had ever really existed in the first place.

“Okay, so this story sounds completely fake, Nick would NEVER air this on TV,” one Kongregate forum poster said in September 2011. “And why would this be made knowing it’s for kids? This story just sounds too fake …”

While the folklore surrounding the film may not be 100 percent factual, Nickelodeon quickly confirmed that the “lost” Halloween movie was very real, and that it did indeed contained all the rumored twisted elements that have made it into a legend.

Before Cry Baby Lane was a blip in Nick’s primetime schedule, it was nearly a $100 million theatrical release. Peter Lauer, who had previously directed episodes of the Nick shows The Secret World of Alex Mack and The Adventures of Pete & Pete, co-wrote the screenplay with KaBlam! co-creator Robert Mittenthal. Cry Baby Lane, which would eventually spawn urban legends of its own, was inspired by a local ghost story Lauer heard growing up in Ohio. “There was a haunted farmhouse, and if you went up there at midnight, you could hear a baby crying and it’d make your high school girlfriend scared,” he told The Daily.

BIG SCARES ON A SMALL BUDGET

Despite Nickelodeon’s well-meaning intentions, parent company Paramount wasn’t keen on the idea of turning the screenplay into a feature film. The script was forgotten for about a year, until Nick got in touch with Lauer about producing Cry Baby Lane—only this time as a $800,000 made-for-TV movie. The director gladly signed on.

Even with the now-meager budget, Cry Baby Lane maintained many of the same elements of a much larger picture. In a bid to generate more publicity around the project, Nickelodeon cast Oscar nominee Frank Langella as the local undertaker (a role Lauer had originally wanted Tom Waits to play). All the biggest set pieces from the screenplay were kept intact, and as a result, the crew had no money left to do any extra filming.

Only two scenes from the movie ended up getting cut—one that alluded to skinny dipping and another that depicted an old man’s head fused onto the body of a baby in a cemetery. The story of a father performing amateur surgery on the corpses of his sons, however, made it into the final film.

The truth of what happened after Cry Baby Lane premiered on October 28, 2000 has been muddied over the years. In most retellings, Nickelodeon received an "unprecedented number" of complaints about the film and responded by sealing it away in its vault and acting like the whole thing never happened. But if that version of events is true, Nick has never acknowledged it.

Even Lauer wasn’t aware of any backlash from parents concerned about the potentially scarring effects of the film until The Daily made him aware of the rumors years later. “All I know is that they aired it once,” he told the paper. “I just assumed they didn’t show it again because they didn’t like it! I did it, I thought it failed, and I moved on.”

But the idea that the movie was pulled from airwaves for being too scary for kids isn’t so far-fetched. Though Cry Baby Lane never shows the conjoined twins being sawed apart on screen, it does pair the already-unsettling story with creepy images of writhing worms, broken glass, and animal skulls. This opening sequence, combined with the spooky, empty-eyed victims of possession that appear later, and multiple scenes where a child gets swallowed by a grave, may have made the film slightly more intense than the average episode of Are You Afraid of the Dark?

IMPERFECT TIMING

Cry Baby Lane premiered at a strange time in internet history: Too early for pirated copies to immediately spring up online yet late enough for it to grow into a web-fueled folktale. The fervor surrounding the film peaked in 2011, when a viral Reddit thread about Cry Baby Lane caught the attention of one user claiming to have the so-called “lost” film recorded on VHS. He later uploaded the tape for the world to view and suddenly the lost movie was lost no longer.

News of the unearthed movie made waves across the web, and instead of staying quiet and waiting for the story to die down, Nickelodeon decided to get in on the hype. That Halloween, Nick aired Cry Baby Lane for the first time in over a decade. Regardless of whether the movie had previously been banned or merely forgotten, the network used the mystery surrounding its origins to their PR advantage.

“We tried to freak people out with it,” a Nick employee who worked at The 90s Are All That (now The Splat), the programming block that resurrected Cry Baby Lane (and who wished to remain anonymous) said of the promotional campaign for the event. “They were creepy and a little glitchy. We were like, ‘This never aired because it was too scary and we’re going to air it now.’”

Cry Baby Lane now makes regular appearances on Nickelodeon’s '90s block around Halloween, which likely means Nick hasn’t received enough complaints to warrant locking it back in the vault. And during less spooky times of the year, nostalgic horror fans can find the full movie on YouTube.

The mystery surrounding Cry Baby Lane’s existence may have been solved, but the urban legend of the movie that was “too scary for kids’ TV” persists—even at the network that produced it.

“People who were definitely working at Nickelodeon in 2000, but didn’t necessarily work on [Cry Baby Lane] were like, ‘Yeah I heard about it, I remember it being a thing,'" the Nick employee says. “It’s sort of like its own legend within the company.”

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