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Seeing the Hidden Oil Patterns on Bowling Lanes Can Improve Your Game

To the amateur bowler, playing in competitive circles may feel like a long shot. But a combination of talent and dedication isn’t all the professionals have going for them: They’ve also learned to see the hidden patterns on bowling lanes that most people fail to notice. This element is crucial to a successful game, and once it’s understood, players at all levels can use it to their advantage.

Vox recently met with pro bowler Parker Bohn III to demystify this secret of the sport. Every lane in a bowling alley is regularly coated with a layer of oil to protect the wooden surface. These oil patterns have a huge impact on the speed, spin, and trajectory of a bowling ball. Different oiling machines leave different patterns, and professionals learn to tackle each one with a unique approach. The Professional Bowlers Association has even distinguished the patterns with unusual names, like "bear," "badger," and "cheetah."

Even if you have trouble spotting the oil pattern on the lane in front of you, learning the house pattern used by most alleys can aid your performance. Watch the video below to see how you can use this strategy to bowl like a pro.

[h/t Vox]

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Hamilton Broadway
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Food
A Hamilton-Themed Cookbook is Coming
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Hamilton Broadway

Fans of Broadway hit Hamilton will soon be able to dine like the Founding Fathers: As Eater reports, a new Alexander Hamilton-inspired cookbook is slated for release in fall 2017.

Cover art for Laura Kumin's forthcoming cookbook
Amazon

Called The Hamilton Cookbook: Cooking, Eating, and Entertaining in Hamilton’s World, the recipe collection by author Laura Kumin “takes you into Hamilton’s home and to his table, with historical information, recipes, and tips on how you can prepare food and serve the food that our founding fathers enjoyed in their day,” according to the Amazon description. It also recounts Hamilton’s favorite dishes, how he enjoyed them, and which ingredients were used.

Recipes included are cauliflower florets two ways, fried sausages and apples, gingerbread cake, and apple pie. (Cue the "young, scrappy, and hungry" references.) The cookbook’s official release is on November 21—but until then, you can stave off your appetite for all things Hamilton-related by downloading the musical’s new app.

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fun
Never Buy Drawing Paper Again With This Endlessly Reusable Art Notebook
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Art supplies can get pricey when you’re letting your kid’s creativity run wild. But with an endlessly reusable notebook, you never have to worry about running out of paper during that after-school coloring session.

The creators of the erasable Rocketbook Wave have come out with a new version of their signature product meant especially for color drawings. The connected Rocketbook Color notebook allows you to send images drawn on its pages to Google Drive or other cloud services with your phone, then erase the pages by sticking the whole notebook in the microwave. You get a digital copy of your work (one that, with more vibrant colors, might look even better than the original) and get to go on drawing almost immediately after you fill the book.

An animated view of a notebook’s pages changing between different drawings.

There’s no special equipment involved beyond the notebook itself. The Rocketbook Color works with Crayola and other brands’ washable crayons and colored pencils, plus dry-erase markers. The pages are designed to be smudge-proof, so turning the page won’t ruin the art on the other side even if you are using dry-erase markers.

Rocketbook’s marketing is aimed at kids, but adults like to save paper, too. Break away from the adult coloring books and go free-form. If it doesn’t quite work out, you can just erase it forever.

The notebooks are $20 each on Kickstarter.

All images courtesy Rocketbook

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