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Chinese Scientists 'Teleport' an Object Into Space

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NASA

It's no Harry-Potter-style apparition, but we're still impressed: Researchers in China have found a way to transmit particles from the ground to a satellite orbiting more than 300 miles above the planet. They described the process in a new paper shared on the preprint server arXiv. 

When we think about teleportation, we often think of the fantastic or futuristic plot device in which a person vanishes in one place and reappears, fully formed, in another. Quantum teleportation is sort of like that. But instead of sending a whole, solid person, quantum teleportation sends information about a quantum particle—such complete information that a new version of the particle can be created on the other end.

The process relies on what's known as quantum entanglement. That's when two particles are connected by a bond so strong that altering one particle will alter the other, even when those particles are separated by inches, or oceans, or space. It's a phenomenon so strange that Albert Einstein called it "spooky action at a distance."

Scientists have been tapping into this spooky action for some time now, transmitting photons and other particles (or their informational essence, anyway) from Point A to Point B. But until now, Point B has always been here, on Earth.

The Micius satellite, named for a 4th-century BCE Chinese philosopher, was launched from the desert sands of the Gobi in 2016. Aboard the satellite, which runs only at night, researchers had tucked a receiving device. If it worked, the receiver would transform the satellite into a very special Point B.

Researchers set up Point A at a ground station in Tibet and spent a month trying to get their photons to teleport. They made millions of attempts and succeeded not once, but more than 900 times. Instruments aboard Micius recorded the appearance of new photon after new photon.

While this success may not get us closer toward wizarding-style transportation, it's a huge leap forward in the ability to rapidly transmit information.

"This work establishes the first ground-to-satellite up-link for faithful and ultra-long-distance quantum teleportation, an essential step toward global-scale quantum internet," the scientists write in their paper.

In other words: One day, we might be complaining because our quantum internet is too slow. Stranger things have happened.

[h/t The Independent]

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Space
SpaceX's Landing Blooper Reel Shows That Even Rocket Scientists Make Mistakes
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SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launches.
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On March 30, 2017, SpaceX did something no space program had done before: They relaunched an orbital class rocket from Earth that had successfully achieved lift-off just a year earlier. It wasn't the first time Elon Musk's company broke new ground: In December 2015, it nailed the landing on a reusable rocket—the first time that had been done—and five months later landed a rocket on a droneship in the middle of the ocean, which was also unprecedented. These feats marked significant moments in the history of space travel, but they were just a few of the steps in the long, messy journey to achieve them. In SpaceX's new blooper reel, spotted by Ars Technica, you can see just some of the many failures the company has had along the way.

The video demonstrates that failure is an important part of the scientific process. Of course when the science you're working in deals with launching and landing rockets, failure can be a lot more dramatic than it is in a lab. SpaceX has filmed their rockets blowing up in the air, disintegrating in the ocean, and smashing against landing pads, often because of something small like a radar glitch or lack of propellant.

While explosions—or "rapid unscheduled disassemblies," as the video calls them—are never ideal, some are preferable to others. The Falcon 9 explosion that shook buildings for miles last year, for instance, ended up destroying the $200 million Facebook satellite onboard. But even costly hiccups such as that one are important to future successes. As Musk once said, "If things are not failing, you are not innovating enough."

You can watch the fiery compilation below.

[h/t Ars Technica]

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Space
Here's Where You Can Watch a Livestream of Cassini's Final Moments
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It's been a road trip like no other. After seven years and 2.2 billion miles, the NASA orbiter Cassini finally arrived at the Saturn system on June 30, 2004. Ever since, it's been capturing and transmitting valuable data about the distant environment. From sending the Huygens probe to land on the moon Titan to witnessing hurricanes on both of the planet's poles, Cassini has informed more than 3000 scientific papers.

It's been as impressive a mission as any spacecraft has ever undertaken. And tomorrow, Cassini will perform one last feat: sacrificing itself to Saturn's intense atmosphere. Project scientists are deliberately plunging it into the planet in order to secure just a little more data—and to keep the spacecraft, which is running low on fuel, from one day colliding with a Saturnian moon that might harbor life.

Because it won't have time to store anything on its hard drive, Cassini will livestream its blaze of glory via NASA. The information will be composed mostly of measurements, since pictures would take too long to send. Instead, we'll get data about Saturn's magnetic field and the composition of its dust and gas.

"As we fly through the atmosphere, we are able to literally scoop up some molecules, and from those we can figure out the ground truth in Saturn’s atmosphere," Scott Edgington, a Cassini project scientist, told New Scientist. "Just like almost everything else in this mission, I expect to be completely surprised."

The action will kick off at 7 a.m. EDT on Friday, September 15. Scientists expect to say goodbye to Cassini less than an hour later. 

While you wait for Cassini's grand finale, you can check out some essential facts we've rounded up from Saturn experts. And keep your eyes peeled for a full recap of Cassini’s historic journey: Mental Floss will be in the control room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, to offer a firsthand account of the craft's final moments in space. 

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