9 Interesting Facts About the Ribs

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Ribs are not just an incredibly tasty order on the menu at the nearest steak house: These bony spindles in your torso attach to your sternum (breast bone) to protect your lungs, heart, spleen, and most of the liver and help with giving shape to your chest cavity, which assists in breathing. Ribs are protective on the one hand, but if badly broken, your ribs can turn lethal to you, piercing your organs. Mental Floss spoke to John Martinez, MD, an urgent care provider with Dignity Health Medical Foundation in California for these nine fascinating facts about the ribs.

1. YOUR RIBS MOVE LIKE A BUCKET HANDLE.

The ribs allow chest expansion for breathing, Martinez explains. "They function similarly to the bucket handle on a bucket and swing upwards as we take a breath, allowing the thoracic cavity to expand." This increase in the thoracic cavity makes it easier to take a breath.

2. YOU HAVE THREE TYPES OF RIBS.

The human skeleton has 12 pairs of ribs. Working from the top of the torso down, ribs 1 to 7 are considered "true ribs," as they connect directly from the spine to the sternum, Martinez says. Ribs 8 to 10 are called "false ribs" because they don't connect directly, but have cartilage that attaches them to the sternum. Ribs 11 and 12 are called "floating ribs" because they only connect to the spine in back. These, he says, "are much shorter."

3. THIS MYTH ABOUT WOMEN'S RIBS PERSISTS.

In an effort to prove the Bible story of Eve as wrought from Adam's rib "true," pastors and Sunday School teachers sometimes pass along a tale that women have more ribs than men. It's not true (and that story is sexist, anyway). Gender plays no part in the number of ribs you have: It's 12 ribs for everyone. However, women's ribs are about 10 percent smaller in volume on average than men's ribs.

4. IN RARE INSTANCES, HUMANS CAN HAVE A "GORILLA RIB."

In rare cases, which have nothing to do with gender, a human might turn up sporting extra lumbar ribs, for a total of 13 pairs of ribs, much like our distant cousins, the gorillas. Thus, it's colloquially known as a "gorilla rib."

5. RIBS ARE THE REASON NEANDERTHALS DIDN'T NEED BELTS.

Neanderthals had wider, thicker rib cages than we modern slim-waisted humans, which would have made them terrible models for skinny jeans. A 2016 study in American Journal of Physical Anthropology found that the Ice-Age diet is likely responsible for the larger ribcage and wider pelvis in Neanderthals. Essentially, carbs were scarce and fat was abundant. This led to an enlarged liver, kidneys and "their corresponding morphological manifestations," the authors write. In other words, they needed more space to house bigger organs.

6. TWO VERY DIFFERENT KINDS OF ATHLETE SHARE ONE COMMON INJURY. 

"Rowers and baseball pitchers are the most common athletes to suffer from stress fractures of the ribs," Martinez says. This is caused by the serratus anterior muscle pulling on the delicate ribs. "Other athletes that may be more likely to suffer from rib stress fractures include golfers, dancers, weightlifters and volleyball players," he adds.

7. YOU CAN SNEEZE YOUR WAY TO A RIB FRACTURE.

"True" rib fractures—where the bone breaks all the way through—are usually from traumatic events such as "a hard football tackle [or] car accident," Martinez says. However, sometimes a rib fracture can occur "from sneezing or coughing due to the force of the contracting chest wall muscles on the ribs." Treatment for true rib fractures is the same as rib stress fractures.

8. WAIST TRAINING USED TO BE ALL THE RAGE … AND STILL SOMETIMES IS.

Women have historically worn corsets, undergarments that cinch the torso in, particularly at the waist, bringing ribs and organs closer together for a smaller waist and more prominent bust. Despite corsets having gone out of fashion by the 1920s, when women began to prefer the looser, more flowing garments of the Flapper era, a number of contemporary women still wear them for reasons ranging from aesthetics to performance art, spawning a practice known as tight lacing or waist training. In this movement, women actively whittle their waists down to exceptionally small circumferences.

Doctors warn that there is risk of permanent damage to squished organs, as well as such uncomfortable syndromes as acid reflux syndrome and back pain. But it doesn't stop those who love the look.

9. THE GUINNESS RECORD HOLDER FOR A TINY WAIST IS 15 INCHES.

2011 Guinness Book of World Records winner Cathie Jung got her waist down to 15 inches through tight lacing by wearing corsets 24 hours a day, and moving down to smaller and smaller sizes. Her waist now has the same circumference as a regular jar of mayonnaise.

10 Facts About Your Tonsils

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iStock/Neustockimages

Most of us only become aware of our tonsils if they become swollen or infected. But these masses of lymphatic tissue in the mouth and throat are important immunological gatekeepers at the start of the airways and digestive tract, grabbing pathogens and warding off diseases before they reach the rest of your body. Here are some essential answers about these often-overlooked tissues—like what to do when your tonsils are swollen, and whether you should get your tonsils removed.

1. People actually have four kinds of tonsils.

The term tonsils usually refers to your palatine tonsils, the ones that can be seen at the back of your throat. But tonsillar tissue also includes the lingual tonsil (located in the base of the tongue), tubal tonsils, and the adenoid tonsil (often just called adenoids). "Collectively, these are referred to as Waldeyer's ring," says Raja Seethala, the director of head and neck pathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a member of the College of American Pathologists Cancer Committee.

2. Tonsils are one of the body's first responders to pathogens.

The tonsils are a key barrier to inhaled or ingested pathogens that can cause infection or other harm, Seethala tells Mental Floss. "These pathogens bind to specialized immune cells in the lining—epithelium—to elicit an immune response in the lymphoid T and B cells of the tonsil," he says. Essentially, they help jumpstart your immune response.

3. Adenoid tonsils can obstruct breathing and cause facial deformities.

If the adenoid tonsils are swollen, they can block breathing and clog up your sinus drainage, which can cause sinus and ear infections. If adenoids are too big, it forces a person to breathe through their mouth. In children, frequent mouth breathing has the potential to cause facial deformities by stressing developing facial bones. "If the tonsils are too large and cause airway obstruction, snoring, or obstructive sleep apnea, then removal is important," says Donald Levine, an ear, nose, and throat specialist in Nyack, New York. Fortunately, the adenoids tend to get smaller naturally in adulthood.

4. As many of us know, sometimes tonsils are removed.

Even though your tonsils are part of your immune system, Levine tells Mental Floss, "when they become obstructive or chronically infected, then they need to be removed." The rest of your immune system steps in to handle further attacks by pathogens. Another reason to remove tonsils besides size, Levine says, is "chronic tonsillitis due to the failure of the immune system to remove residual bacteria from the tonsils, despite multiple antibiotic therapies."

5. Tonsillectomies have been performed for thousands of years ...

Tonsil removal is believed to have been a phenomenon for three millennia. The procedure is found in ancient Ayurvedic texts, says Seethala, "making it one of the older documented surgical procedures." But though the scientific understanding of the surgery has changed dramatically since then, "the benefits versus harm of tonsillectomy have been continually debated over the centuries," he says.

6. ... and they were probably quite painful.

The first known reported case of tonsillectomy surgery, according to a 2006 paper in Otorhinolaryngology, is by Cornélio Celsus, a Roman "encylopaediest" and dabbler in medicine, who authored a medical encyclopedia titled Of Medicine in the 1st century BCE. Thanks to his work, we can surmise that a tonsillectomy probably was an agonizing procedure for the patient: "Celsus applied a mixture of vinegar and milk in the surgical specimen to hemostasis [stanch bleeding] and also described his difficulty doing that due to lack of proper anesthesia."

7. Tonsil removal was performed for unlikely reasons.

The same paper reveals that among some of the more outlandish reasons for removing tonsils were conditions like "night enuresis (bed-wetting), convulsions, laryngeal stridor, hoarseness, chronic bronchitis, and asthma."

8. An early treatment for swollen tonsils included frog fat.

As early practitioners struggled to perfect techniques for removing tonsils effectively, another early physician, Aetius de Amida, recommended "ointment, oils, and corrosive formulas with frog fat to treat infections."

9. Modern tonsillectomy is much more sophisticated.

A common technique today for removing the tonsils, according to Levine, is a far cry from the painful early attempts. Under brief general anesthesia, Levine uses a process called coblation. "[It's] a kind of cold cautery, so there is almost no bleeding, less post operative pain, and quicker healing. You can return to normal activities 10 days later," Levine says.

10. Sexually-transmitted HPV can cause tonsil cancer.

The incidence of tonsillar cancers is increasing, according to Seethala. "Unlike other head and neck cancers, which are commonly associated with smoking and alcohol, tonsillar cancers are driven by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)," he says. "HPV-related tonsillar cancer can be considered sexually transmitted."

26 Amazing Facts About the Human Body

Mental Floss via YouTube
Mental Floss via YouTube

At some point in your life, you've probably wondered: What is belly button lint, anyway? The answer, according to Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy, is that it's "fibers that rub off of clothing over time." And hairy people are more prone to getting it for a very specific (and kind of gross-sounding) reason. A group of scientists who formed the Belly Button Biodiversity Project in 2011 have also discovered that there's a whole lot of bacteria going on in there.

In this week's all-new edition of The List Show, Erin is sharing 26 amazing facts about the human body, from your philtrum (the dent under your nose) to your feet. You can watch the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

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