7 Surprising Facts About the Chin

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iStock

The human body is an amazing thing. For each one of us, it’s the most intimate object we know. And yet most of us don’t know enough about it: its features, functions, quirks, and mysteries. Our series The Body explores human anatomy, part by part. Think of it as a mini digital encyclopedia with a dose of wow.

The humble chin, that bony protrusion at the bottom of your face, is a mysterious little body part that is a surprising source of controversy among researchers. Though popular culture derives great meaning out of how "strong" or "weak" chins are, very little science backs that up. Here, however, are seven actually scientific facts, which Mental Floss learned from experts, about the chin.

1. RESEARCHERS DISAGREE ABOUT THE PURPOSE OF A CHIN.

The most interesting thing about the chin, according to Faisal Tawwab, a family practice doctor with Multicare Physicians in Orlando, Florida, is that there is no precise answer as to why we even have one. "Prevailing theories include assistance with speech, to protect the jaw from chewing, as a way to measure attractiveness when seeking a partner, or a combination of all three," he tells Mental Floss. "Research to find the true purpose of the chin is ongoing. There are critiques around all of the current prevailing theories."

2. IT MIGHT HELP THE JAW STRESS LESS.

The chin may have evolved to protect the jaw from the unique stresses of shaping our mouths to form language, according to a 2007 study in the journal Medical Hypotheses. Your chin may help bear some of the muscle load of chewing and speaking (a valid reason to want a strong one).

3. THE CHIN IS CRITICAL TO CHEWING.

"The most important function of the chin is mastication [chewing] and lip continence," Francesco Gargano, a board certified plastic surgeon with The Plastic Surgery Center in New Jersey, tells Mental Floss. "Several muscles insert into the chin and are part of the occlusal plane," the space between your teeth when the mouth is closed. Research supports this theory, suggesting that the chin "helps buttress the jaw against certain mechanical stresses," including chewing, which produces a great deal of force.

4. CHINS MAY HAVE HELPED OUR ANCESTORS CHOOSE A MATE.

A more recent theory is that our chins helped us choose mates. "Males tend to have longer chins with a square appearance and flat base. Females tend to have narrower and rounder chins," says Gargano. A 2010 study in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology argues that there would be no difference in chin shape if it weren't related to sexual attraction because there's no functional difference; males and females ostensibly eat and talk the same way. Not everyone agrees. (See #7.)  

5. WE'RE THE ONLY ANIMALS WITH CHINS. 

While humans may share some things in common with animals, chins are not one of them. "Elephants are the only other creature with a body part similar to the chin," Tawwab says. But the elephant's "chin" is actually caused by a lack of lower teeth and a big lower lip. It's not a bony protrusion, which is a real chin—and a feature that's ours alone. The human chin is considered a cladistic apomorphy, Tawwab says: a feature or body part not found in the earliest forms of a clade (group of organisms sharing a common ancestor). In short, it's evidence of our species's evolution—and one of our defining physical characteristics.

6. DOES HAVING A CHIN CLEFT IMPROVE YOUR DATING PROSPECTS? 

"Historically, numerous cultures have assigned meanings to being born with a cleft chin, usually pertaining to luckiness in love," Tawwab says. The reality is much more mundane. "The current theory suggests that a cleft chin is actually caused by an incomplete fusion of the jaw bones before birth." There are several types of clefts, as well: vertical furrows, Y-shaped furrows, and round dimples. 

7. A CHIN MAY SIMPLY BE WHERE EVOLUTION STOPPED.

A chin may not have anything to do with withstanding pressure or attracting a mate, according to Nathan Holton, an anthropologist at the University of Iowa. His research suggests that the Homo genus (including humans, Neanderthals, and other relatives) simply evolved smaller faces—and Homo sapiens most of all. The lower jaw is the last part of the face to stop growing, which causes it to be more prominent as compared to other parts of the face. The prominent chin "is a secondary consequence of faces getting smaller," Holton writes.

What Purpose Does the Belly Button Serve?

misuma/iStock via Getty Images
misuma/iStock via Getty Images

While your eyelashes are protecting your eyes, your lungs are letting you breathe, and virtually every other part of your body—inside and out—is performing its own relatively well-known task, your belly button is just sitting there collecting lint. And while it’s true that your navel served its most important purpose before you were born, it’s not totally useless now.

According to ZME Science, back when you were a fetus, your belly button was more of a belly portal: Your umbilical cord extended from it and connected you to the placenta on your mother’s uterine wall. That way, the placenta could channel nutrients and oxygen to you through the cord, and you could send back waste.

Your umbilical cord was cut when you were born, creating a tiny bulge that left behind some scar tissue after it healed. That scar tissue is your belly button, navel, or umbilicus. Though you may have heard that the shape of your belly button is a direct result of the scissor skills of the doctor who delivered you, that’s not true. Dr. Dan Polk, a neonatologist in the Chicago area, told the Chicago Tribune that a belly button's shape “has to do with how much baby skin leads onto the umbilical cord from the baby’s body. Less skin makes an innie; more skin makes an outie.” About 90 percent of people have innies.

Regardless of how your belly button looks, you probably don’t use it on a daily basis. However, if you’ve studied anatomy, medicine, or a related field, you might recognize it as the central point by which the abdomen is divided into the following quadrants: right upper, left upper, right lower, and left lower. Another way of classifying that area is into nine regions—including the hypochondriac, lumbar, iliac, epigastric, and hypogastric regions—with the umbilical region at the very center.

Abdominopelvic regions diagram
Blausen Medical, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0

Your belly button can also serve as the opening for laparoscopic surgery, which can save you from having a scar elsewhere on your abdomen.

The navel is a great central landmark outside of medicine, too. If you’ve taken yoga or Pilates classes, you may have heard it referred to as the center of balance or center of gravity. Because it sits right on top of your abdominal muscles, your belly button is an easy marker for your instructor to mention when they want you to access your core, which helps you balance.

And, of course, belly buttons are notorious for storing quite a bit of lint, which always seems to be blue (you can learn more about that here).

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

‘Water’ in Kansas City Woman’s Ear Turned Out to Be a Venomous Brown Recluse Spider

N-sky/iStock via Getty Images
N-sky/iStock via Getty Images

Susie Torres, a resident of Kansas City, Missouri, woke up on Tuesday morning with the distinct feeling that water was lodged in her left ear. She likened it to the swooshing sensation that can often happen after swimming, WDAF-TV reports.

Instead of waiting for the problem to resolve itself, Torres went to the doctor—a decision that might have saved her from some serious pain. The medical assistant was the first to realize something was alarmingly amiss, and immediately called for backup.

“She ran out and said ‘I’m going to get a couple more people,’” Torres told 41 Action News. “She then said, ‘I think you have an insect in there.’” For many people, the thought of having any live insect stuck in an ear would be enough to cue a small- or large-scale freak-out, but Torres stayed calm.

The doctors “had a few tools and worked their magic and got it out,” Torres said. The “it” in question turned out to be a spider—and not just any harmless house spider (which you shouldn’t kill, by the way). It was a venomous brown recluse spider.

“Gross,” Torres told WDAF-TV. “Why, where, what, and how.”

Miraculously, the spider didn’t bite Torres. If it had, she would’ve ended up visiting the doctor with more than general ear discomfort: Brown recluse bites can cause pain, burning, fever, nausea, and purple or blue discoloration of the surrounding skin, according to Healthline.

Torres may have remained admirably level-headed throughout the ordeal, but that doesn’t mean she’s taking it lightly. “I went and put some cotton balls in my ears last night,” she told WDAF-TV. “I’m shaking off my clothes, and I don’t put my purse on the floor. I’m a little more cautious.”

Is this the first time an insect has posted up in the ear of an unsuspecting, innocent human? Absolutely not—here are six more horror stories, featuring a cockroach, a bed bug, and more.

[h/t WDAF-TV]

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