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A French chateau, painted by Spanish graffiti artist Okuda San Miguel to promote French street art festival LaBel Valette Festival.
Chop Em Down/Ink and Movement

Spanish Street Artist Turns Abandoned Castle in France Into a Work of Art

Original image
A French chateau, painted by Spanish graffiti artist Okuda San Miguel to promote French street art festival LaBel Valette Festival.
Chop Em Down/Ink and Movement

Spanish street artist Okuda San Miguel—who simply goes by the name Okuda—is known for creating prismatic, geometric murals that cover abandoned historic churches, city streets, high-rises, and the sides of trucks and trains. For one of his latest projects, Okuda has transformed an abandoned 19th-century chateau in France’s Loire Valley into a pop art paradise, deMilked reports.

Before Okuda gave it a facelift, the crumbling chateau—which, in later years, also served as a school—had been abandoned for 30 years. According to Konbini, its vivid makeover was officially completed on July 7, to promote LaBel Valette, a French street art festival that will take place in September.

The mural’s title is Skull in the Mirror. Okuda painted two large-scale geometric skulls across the castle’s white facade, and added colorful polka dots and paint accents to the remaining blank surfaces. On September 1, according to deMilked, 100 other street artists will join Okuda in giving the 100,000-plus square foot castle a full makeover.

You can view some photos of the project below:

[h/t deMilked]

Original image
A French chateau, painted by Spanish graffiti artist Okuda San Miguel to promote French street art festival LaBel Valette Festival.
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Art
Artist Makes Colorful Prints From 1990s VHS Tapes

A collection of old VHS tapes offers endless crafting possibilities. You can use them to make bird houses, shelving units, or, if you’re London-based artist Dieter Ashton, screen prints from the physical tape itself.

As Co.Design reports, the recent London College of Communication graduate was originally intrigued by the art on the cover of old VHS and cassette tapes. He planned to digitally edit them as part of a new art project, but later realized that working with the ribbons of tape inside was much more interesting.

To make a print, Ashton unravels the film from cassettes and VHS tapes collected from his parents' home. He lets the strips fall randomly then presses them into tight, tangled arrangements with the screen. The piece is then brought to life with vibrant patterns and colors.

Ashton has started playing with ways to incorporate themes and motifs from the films he's repurposing into his artwork. If the movie behind one of his creations isn’t immediately obvious, you can always refer to its title. His pieces are named after movies like Backdraft, Under Siege, and that direct-to-video Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen classic Passport to Paris.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

Screen print made from an old VHS tape.

[h/t Co.Design]

All images courtesy of Dieter Ashton

Original image
A French chateau, painted by Spanish graffiti artist Okuda San Miguel to promote French street art festival LaBel Valette Festival.
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photography
This Is What Flowers Look Like When Photographed With an X-Ray Machine
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Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Peruvian Daffodil” (1938)

Many plant photographers choose to showcase the vibrant colors and physical details of exotic flora. For his work with flowers, Dr. Dain L. Tasker took a more bare-bones approach. The radiologist’s ghostly floral images were recorded using only an X-ray machine, according to Hyperallergic.

Tasker snapped his pictures of botanical life while he was working at Los Angeles’s Wilshire Hospital in the 1930s. He had minimal experience photographing landscapes and portraits in his spare time, but it wasn’t until he saw an X-ray of an amaryllis, taken by a colleague, that he felt inspired to swap his camera for the medical tool. He took black-and-white radiographs of everything from roses and daffodils to eucalypti and holly berries. The otherworldly artwork was featured in magazines and art shows during Tasker’s lifetime.

Selections from Tasker's body of work have been seen around the world, including as part of the Floral Studies exhibition at the Joseph Bellows Gallery in San Diego in 2016. Prints of his work are also available for purchase from the Stinehour Wemyss Editions and Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “Philodendron” (1938)

X-ray image of a rose.
Dr. Dain L. Tasker, “A Rose” (1936)

All images courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery.

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