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NOAA Suomi-NPP/University of Oxford/Simon Proud
NOAA Suomi-NPP/University of Oxford/Simon Proud

As Predicted, a Massive Iceberg Just Broke Off in Antarctica

NOAA Suomi-NPP/University of Oxford/Simon Proud
NOAA Suomi-NPP/University of Oxford/Simon Proud

Well, it finally happened. As Mental Floss reported last week, the last few decades have seen dramatic changes to the Larsen ice shelf, most recently with a growing rift along the section called Larsen C threatening to entirely break off. This week, it finally split, creating an iceberg the size of Delaware. At more than a trillion tons, it's one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.

The sections called Larsen A and B collapsed in 1995 and 2002, respectively, effectively reshaping the coastline of the Antarctic Peninsula.

The Larsen C crack spread slowly—you might say glacially—at first. But by June 2017, it was cruising right along, widening at a pace of about 32 feet per day. Experts at Swansea University’s Project Midas, which monitors the ice shelf, predicted the break would come within "hours, days, or weeks."

It took about a week. New imagery from NASA’s Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite shows a distinct split in the ice shelf.

"The rift was barely visible in these data in recent weeks," Adrian Luckman of Swansea University told the BBC, "but the signature is so clear now that it must have opened considerably along its whole length."

The precise cause of the split remains to be seen. While climate change is responsible for melting sea ice around the world, experts say this particular break may have been inevitable.

"We know that rifts like this periodically propagate and cause large tabular icebergs to break from ice shelves, even in the absence of any climate-driven changes," Chris Borstad, of the University Centre in Svalbard, told the BBC. "I am working with a number of colleagues to design field experiments on Larsen C to answer this specific question (by measuring the properties of the Joerg suture zone directly). But until we get down there and take some more measurements, we can only speculate."

[h/t BBC]

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environment
To Encourage Responsible Trash Disposal, a Startup in Nigeria Pays People for their Waste
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Nigeria is home to more than 180 million people, who produce more than 32 million tons of waste per year and just 20 to 30 percent of this garbage is collected, according to one estimate. To provide Nigerians with incentive to dispose of their trash responsibly, Junks, a Nigerian waste management startup, provides people with the chance to exchange their trash for cash, according to Konbini.

The company offers to pay for items and materials like discarded electronics, glass, plastic, aluminum, books, and clothes. Once purchased, these materials are re-sold to wholesalers and recycling companies, according to Techpoint. Potential users who want to sell their trash are required to register on the startup's website, Junks.ng, and fill out a form with a description of the trash they're selling, along with their asking price and contact information. Once this information is received, representatives from Junks are sent to pick up and pay for the waste.

Computer programmer Bradley Yarrow founded Junks.ng in August 2017. Based in Port Harcourt, the capital of Rivers State, Nigeria, the company currently has just three employees, in addition to Yarrow. That said, the tiny startup appears to be doing big business, judging from a growing list of sold junk—which includes laminating machines, old laptops, and scrap car parts—already listed on Junks.ng.

[h/t Konbini]

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architecture
High-Tech Skyscrapers Could be Built with Low-Tech Wood
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When we think of wood construction, we often think of log cabins, tree houses, or the framework of residential properties. But if a new start-up has its way, we might soon be gazing up at 12-story buildings made almost entirely out of Douglas firs.

In a report for CityLab, journalist Amanda Kolson Hurley profiled Portland, Oregon's Lever Architecture, a firm attempting to revitalize wood-based towers that reduce the carbon footprints of conventional buildings. Their offices are located in a four-story property made from wood; their next major project, titled Framework, is expected to be 12 stories and slated to debut in Portland in 2019.

Part of Lever’s goal is to reduce concerns over wooden structures—namely, that they’re prone to fire hazards or might not be structurally sound in an earthquake. Developers use a building material called mass timber, a special type of strengthened wood in which timber panels are glued together to make beams and cross-set layers for walls and floors. Fire tests have shown the mass timber doesn’t ignite easily: It chars, which can insulate the rest of the panel from the heat. Strength testing has shown the layers aren’t easily jostled by outside forces.

Lever’s architects hope that wooden buildings will lessen the environmental impact of commercial towers that use concrete and steel, which are responsible for 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions during their manufacturing.

Other firms have designs on taller buildings, including one 35-story tower in Paris and a 24-story building in Vienna.

[h/t CityLab]

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