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10 Fun Facts About Johnny Bravo

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Cartoon Network

In the early 1990s, Ted Turner committed himself to building an animation empire. In 1991, Turner Entertainment purchased Hanna-Barbera, the animation house responsible for classic toons like Scooby-Doo, The Flintstones, Space Ghost, and countless others. And with the launch of Turner’s Cartoon Network in 1992, all of those classic cartoons would have a permanent home. That took care of the nostalgia crowd, but the network was also anxious to create unique, original content to get the younger generation hooked on this 24/7 world of animation.

On July 14, 1997, Cartoon Network debuted a show that would become a cornerstone of that move toward fresh content: Johnny Bravo. To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the muscle-bound greaser with the golden pompadour, here are 10 facts about Johnny Bravo.

1. JOHNNY BRAVO IS A TAKE ON ITS CREATOR'S FULL NAME.

Though it’s easy to assume that the name "Johnny Bravo" came from Greg Brady’s alter ego on The Brady Bunch, it’s actually a take on creator Van Partible’s full name, which is Efram Giovanni Bravo Partible.

2. BRAVO’S VOICE IS A MIX OF YOUNG AND OLD ELVIS.

When Partible told the eventual voice of Johnny Bravo, Jeff Bennett, that he wanted the character to sound like Elvis, Bennett only had one question: Old or young? Bennett explained that they’re basically two unique voices, with a younger Elvis sounding much faster and more energetic, while the elder Presley would require Bennett to deepen and “slow it down.”

Partible asked for something more in the middle, resulting in the signature Bravo voice. While Partible heard a lot of Elvis impersonators for the role, he said Bennett was the only one to go beyond imitation and become an actual character. 

3. JOHNNY BRAVO’S BIGGEST SUPPORTERS AT CARTOON NETWORK WERE WOMEN.

After Partible’s initial pitch, Cartoon Network was going to pass on Johnny Bravo for not being “cartoony” enough. That is until three prominent women at the network—Ellen Cockrill, Janet Mazotti, and Julie Kane-Ritsch—fought for the show to get picked up.

It may sound strange for the chauvinistic Bravo to have their support, but as Partible mentioned in his blog, “I think it's because they know Johnny Bravos in their lives and can relate. They also enjoy watching him get his comeuppance.”

4. THE SHOW GREW FROM PARTIBLE’S SENIOR THESIS PROJECT.

While studying animation at Loyola Marymount University, Partible created a short animated film for his senior thesis project called Mess o’ Blues. The short focuses on a character not too far off from an Elvis impersonator, who looks like a much thinner Bravo with jet black hair and one of The King’s trademark white jumpsuits.

The film was sent to Hanna-Barbera, which was on the lookout for new talent after the launch of Cartoon Network. After receiving acclaim from the studio, Partible was brought in to pitch a series based on the film. Partible expanded on the initial project, including a redesign and rebranding of the main character into Johnny Bravo.

To this day, there’s been no official release of Mess o’ Blues, though some snippets of footage do exist.

5. PARTIBLE BASED THE SHOW’S STYLE ON AL HIRSCHFELD ILLUSTRATIONS.

One of the most striking things about Johnny Bravo—especially when compared to its contemporaries—is its minimalist character designs. The lines and extraneous details are kept to a minimum—so much so that Bravo himself often has a face that consists of large black circles for sunglasses and a few simple lines for a nose. In Bravo’s world, mouths seem to come and go as needed.

This was all part of Partible’s vision, as he was inspired by the work of famed illustrator Al Hirschfeld, who was most famous for his caricatures of Broadway stars and big screen celebrities. In particular, Bravo’s head and trademark hair were a take on Hirschfeld’s caricature of actor Richard Davalos for an illustration he did in 1995 that looked back at Arthur Miller’s A View From the Bridge. The hairdo's vertical lift was the perfect complement to Bravo's faux-greaser panache. 

6. JOHNNY BRAVO WAS ON-THE-JOB TRAINING FOR PARTIBLE.

When Cartoon Network accepted Partible’s pitch for Johnny Bravo, there was only one problem: Partible had never worked on a full-fledged TV show before. “My new producer, Larry Huber, told me that this was going to be a type of graduate school where I was going to learn how to make cartoons from the ground up in the studio system,” Partible wrote on his blog.

The initial deal that Partible signed on for was a “step deal,” which he described as, “I was going to be under careful watch and evaluated after every step of production to see if they wanted to continue to go forward.”

The experience turned out to be a blessing. At the time, Cartoon Network was looking to experiment, and Partible’s youth and inexperience were something the network was willing to gamble on. Looking to capture the unique style of upstart creators, the company let Partible do the cartoon his own way. 

7. THE LEGENDARY JOE BARBERA WAS PART OF THE WRITERS’ ROOM.

The goal for Hanna-Barbera during this time was to create new shows that still felt like the classic series the studio put out in the ’60s and ’70s. It’s pretty easy to achieve that when one half of the company’s namesake—Joe Barbera—agreed to take a hands-on approach to Johnny Bravo during the mid-’90s.

Though he wasn’t a full-time member of the show’s staff, Partible described Barbera's role in his blog:

“So, once a week, we would get a visit from Mr. B, pick his brain, and come up with jokes. He seemed to enjoy the goofy banter we had in the room.”

Barbera became a literal part of the show when he briefly appeared in the episode “Bravo Dooby Doo” when Johnny, Scooby, and the gang team up to unmask the ghoul of the week. When Partible screened the episode for Barbera, the legendary cartoonist fell asleep, only to be startled awake when Bravo and Thelma screamed his name toward the end of the show.

8. THE SHOW WAS AN EARLY BREAK FOR SETH MACFARLANE AND BUTCH HARTMAN.

The influence Johnny Bravo had on audiences is well documented, but the show’s production also helped launch the careers of two household names of animation: Family Guy’s Seth MacFarlane and The Fairly OddParents creator Butch Hartman.

MacFarlane was a writer and storyboard artist on Bravo during its first year, while Hartman performed the same duties but also directed 10 episodes of the show in 1997. MacFarlane and Hartman also worked on other Cartoon Network shows for Hanna-Barbera before going off to create their own series in the late ’90s and early 2000s.

9. JOHNNY BRAVO LED TO ONE OF FAMILY GUY’S MOST MEMORABLE CHARACTERS.

In the episode “Johnny Bravo Meets Adam West,” the famed former Batman comes to Johnny's aid after Mamma Bravo goes missing (in reality, she's about one minute late getting home from grocery shopping). The episode was written by Hartman and MacFarlane, which is where the future Family Guy creator first met the man who would eventually become the mayor of Quahog.

The experience on Bravo—highlighted by West’s surreal, self-aware performance—inspired MacFarlane to bring the actor aboard Family Guy years later. In an interview with The A.V. Club, MacFarlane expanded on his choice:

"I wrote on a show called Johnny Bravo when I was at Hanna-Barbera, and he guest-starred as himself. He was so funny, and he's got this way about him. I think he likes playing into what he's known for, even on a casual basis. He's a really fun guy to work with, and genuinely gets comedy. It's not the type of situation where you just bring somebody in to make fun of themselves."

10. THERE WAS TALK OF A BRAVO MOVIE STARRING THE ROCK IN 2002.

When Johnny Bravo was in the middle of its Cartoon Network run, Warner Bros. wanted to make the jump from animation to live-action with a movie adaptation of the show, and there were rumors that they wanted Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson as Johnny. The Rock is apparently a huge Johnny Bravo fan, which caught the attention of producers Marty Adelstein and Neal Moritz.

Plans obviously fell through, and since then, no serious news on a renewed effort to make a Johnny Bravo movie has surfaced. Moritz and Johnson have since teamed up on the Fast and the Furious franchise.

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11 Delicious Facts About Good Burger
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Paramount Pictures

It takes just 14 words—“Welcome to Good Burger, home of the Good Burger, can I take your order?”—to make a ‘90s kid swoon with nostalgia. Good Burger, the beloved Nickelodeon comedy about a couple of daft teens who try to save their fast food joint from corporate greed, was born out of a Kenan Thompson/Kel Mitchell sketch on All That in the mid-'90s. A year later, due to its popularity, it found itself being turned into its own live-action movie, with Brian Robbins at the helm. Today—20 years after its original release—it’s a silly cult hit that’s indelibly a part of Generation Y. Revisit the classic with these facts about Good Burger.

1. KEL MITCHELL AUDITIONED FOR ALL THAT WITH HIS CHARACTER FROM GOOD BURGER.

In an interview with The A.V. Club, Kel Mitchell explained how he came up with Ed. “I did a ‘dude’ voice, and that’s where Ed [from Good Burger] was kind of born,” he said. “I did that there at the audition. They were just cracking up.”

2. ED’S FIRST APPEARANCE WAS IN THE JOSH SERVER SKETCH, “DREAM REMOTE.”

Essentially, Good Burger was born out of a random character decision made during one little sketch. “It was where [Josh] could have a remote control that could control his entire life,” Mitchell told The A.V. Club. “So, he could fast-forward through his sister nagging, he could make pizza come really quickly. I was the pizza guy. I came to the door, and the pizza guy didn’t really have a voice, so I was like, ‘Mleh, here’s your pizza! That was the first time we saw Ed, and so they created Good Burger.”

3. ED’S LOOK WAS INSPIRED BY MILLI VANILLI.

When prepping for Ed’s debut on All That, Kel Mitchell spotted what would become the character’s signature look. “I remember I went to the hair room, and I saw these braids. It was like these early Brandy ’90s Milli Vanilli braids. I put those on, and it came to life,” he told The A.V. Club.

4. THOUSANDS OF POUNDS OF MEAT STUNK UP THE SET.

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For a movie all about burgers, you better believe the production had a ton of them sitting around on set. "At one point, there was over 1750 pounds of meat on the set," Kenan Thompson told The Morning Call. "Some of it was old meat. It was so nasty. Some of the burgers would stay out there for a long time. I felt sorry for the extras who had to eat them with cold, clammy fries. But on screen, those burgers look good."

5. ELMER’S GLUE WAS USED TO KEEP THE FOOD LOOKING FRESH.

In order to keep the food looking good on screen, the production resorted to old, albeit inedible, tricks. "It was so gross, because when I scoop out ice cream in the movie, it was really vegetable shortening with food coloring,” Mitchell told The Morning Call. “When I poured milk on cereal, we used Elmer's Glue so the flakes wouldn't get soggy."

6. KENAN AND KEL CONTRIBUTED TO THE GOOD BURGER SOUNDTRACK.

Good Burger was their baby, so of course Kenan and Kel took the reins on more than just the creation of the characters, according to a 1997 interview with The Morning Call. Specifically, Kel partnered up with Less Than Jake on the hit song, “We’re All Dudes.” Because of this, the soundtrack actually charted at 101 on the Billboard 200.

7. GOOD BURGER WAS LINDA CARDELLINI’S FEATURE FILM DEBUT.

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In an interview with The A.V. Club, the Freaks and Geeks star reminisced about her breakout role in the Nickelodeon movie. “That’s my sister’s favorite role that I’ve ever played! It was so much fun. It was my first film, and it was a fantastic part,” Cardellini said. “I got to play crazy! Nobody knew who I was, and I got the part from the table read.”

8. WRITER DAN SCHNEIDER INTENDED TO GIVE UP ACTING WHEN HE WROTE GOOD BURGER, BUT HE PLAYED MR. BAILY IN THE FILM.

On creating Good Burger, writer/producer/actor Dan Schneider explained to The A.V. Club: “I’ve always wanted to write, and after I was doing All That and Kenan & Kel, I got the opportunity to do another TV show—I was still going on auditions. I realized that if I took that show, I was going to have to give up All That and Kenan & Kel. I really didn’t want to do [that] ... I passed on the acting role, and that was really the turning point, I guess, in 1996, when I was like, ‘You know what? I’m going to put my acting career on the back burner, and I’m going to be a writer-producer.’ Then I wrote the movie Good Burger.” However, if you watch the movie, you’ll notice Schneider starring as Mr. Baily.

9. THE ORIGINAL TRAILER FEATURED A SCENE THAT DIDN’T MAKE THE MOVIE.

For reasons that remain a mystery, a scene where a Good Burger customer orders “a good shake” from Ed (Mitchell), only to receive an actual bodily shaking from the Good Burger employee, didn’t make the final cut. It did, however, feature for a few seconds in the theatrical trailer.

10. KENAN AND KEL REUNITED FOR A GOOD BURGER SKETCH ON THE TONIGHT SHOW.

In 2015, Kenan and Kel reunited for a Good Burger sketch with Jimmy Fallon. This time, however, Fallon played Ed’s co-worker, while Kenan came in as a construction worker as a surprise. "We've been wanting to get back together," Mitchell told E! News. "It was just about the right project ... it felt like home."

11. THE FIRST LINE IN THE FILM IS THE SAME AS THE LAST LINE.

Appropriately, the line is, “Welcome to Good Burger, home of the Good Burger, can I take your order?”—just watch the movie.

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10 Surprising Facts About The Babadook
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IFC Films

In 2014, The Babadook came out of nowhere and scared audiences across the globe. Written and directed by Aussie Jennifer Kent, and based on her short film Monster, The Babadook is about a widow named Amelia (played by Kent’s drama schoolmate Essie Davis) who has trouble controlling her young son Samuel (Noah Wiseman), who thinks there’s a monster living in their house. Amelia reads Samuel a pop-up book, Mister Babadook, and Samuel manifests the creature into a real-life monster. The Babadook may be the villain, but the film explores the pitfalls of parenting and grief in an emotional way. 

“I never approached this as a straight horror film,” Kent told Complex. “I always was drawn to the idea of grief, and the suppression of that grief, and the question of, how would that affect a person? ... But at the core of it, it’s about the mother and child, and their relationship.”

Shot on a $2 million budget, the film grossed more than $10.3 million worldwide and gained an even wider audience via streaming networks. Instead of creating Babadook out of CGI, a team generated the images in-camera, inspired by the silent films of Georges Méliès and Lon Chaney. Here are 10 things you might not have known about The Babadook (dook, dook).

1. THE NAME “BABADOOK” WAS EASY FOR A CHILD TO INVENT.

Jennifer Kent told Complex that some people thought the creature’s name sounded “silly,” which she agreed with. “I wanted it to be like something a child could make up, like ‘jabberwocky’ or some other nonsensical name,” she explained. “I wanted to create a new myth that was just solely of this film and didn’t exist anywhere else.”

2. JENNIFER KENT WAS WORRIED PEOPLE WOULD JUDGE THE MOTHER.

Amelia isn’t the best mother in the world—but that’s the point. “I’m not a parent,” Kent told Rolling Stone, “but I’m surrounded by friends and family who are, and I see it from the outside … how parenting seems hard and never-ending.” She thought Amelia would receive “a lot of flak” for her flawed parenting, but the opposite happened. “I think it’s given a lot of women a sense of reassurance to see a real human being up there,” Kent said. “We don’t get to see characters like her that often.”

3. KENT AND ESSIE DAVIS TONED DOWN THE CONTENT FOR THE KID.

Noah Wiseman was six years old when he played Samuel. Kent and Davis made sure he wasn’t present for the more horrific scenes, like when Amelia tells Samuel she wishes he was the one who died, not her husband. “During the reverse shots, where Amelia was abusing Sam verbally, we had Essie yell at an adult stand-in on his knees,” Kent told Film Journal. “I didn’t want to destroy a childhood to make this film—that wouldn’t be fair.”

Kent explained a “kiddie version” of the plot to Wiseman. “I said, ‘Basically, Sam is trying to save his mother and it’s a film about the power of love.’”

4. THE FILM IS ALSO ABOUT “FACING OUR SHADOW SIDE.”

IFC Films

Kent told Film Journal that “The Babadook is a film about a woman waking up from a long, metaphorical sleep and finding that she has the power to protect herself and her son.” She noted that everybody has darkness to face. “Beyond genre and beyond being scary, that’s the most important thing in the film—facing our shadow side.”

5. THE FILM SCARED THE HELL OUT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE EXORCIST.

In an interview with Uproxx, William Friedkin—director of The Exorcist—said The Babadook was one of the best and scariest horror films he’d ever seen. He especially liked the emotional aspect of the film. “It’s not only the simplicity of the filmmaking and the excellence of the acting not only by the two leads, but it’s the way the film works slowly but inevitably on your emotions,” he said.

6. AN ART DEPARTMENT ASSISTANT SCORED THE ROLE AS THE BABADOOK.

Tim Purcell worked in the film’s art department but then got talked into playing the titular character after he acted as the creature for some camera tests. “They realized they could save some money, and have me just be the Babadook, and hence I became the Babadook,” Purcell told New York Magazine. “In terms of direction, it was ‘be still a lot,’” he said.

7. THE MOVIE BOMBED IN ITS NATIVE AUSTRALIA.

Even though Kent shot the film in Adelaide, Australians didn’t flock to the theaters; it grossed just $258,000 in its native country. “Australians have this [built-in] aversion to seeing Australian films,” Kent told The Cut. “They hardly ever get excited about their own stuff. We only tend to love things once everyone else confirms they’re good … Australian creatives have always had to go overseas to get recognition. I hope one day we can make a film or work of art and Australians can think it’s good regardless of what the rest of the world thinks.”

8. YOU CAN OWN A MISTER BABADOOK BOOK (BUT IT WILL COST YOU). 

IFC Films

In 2015, Insight Editions published 6200 pop-up books of Mister Babadook. Kent worked with the film’s illustrator, Alexander Juhasz, who created the book for the movie. He and paper engineer Simon Arizpe brought the pages to life for the published version. All copies sold out but you can find some Kent-signed ones on eBay, going for as much as $500.

9. THE BABADOOK IS A GAY ICON.

It started at the end of 2016, when a Tumblr user started a jokey thread about how he thought the Babadook was gay. “It started picking up steam within a few weeks,” Ian, the Tumblr user, told New York Magazine, “because individuals who I presume are heterosexual kind of freaked out over the assertion that a horror movie villain would identify as queer—which I think was the actual humor of the post, as opposed to just the outright statement that the Babadook is gay.” In June, the Babadook became a symbol for Gay Pride month. Images of the character appeared everywhere at this year's Gay Pride Parade in Los Angeles.

10. DON'T HOLD YOUR BREATH FOR A SEQUEL.

Kent, who owns the rights to The Babadook, told IGN that, despite the original film's popularity, she's not planning on making any sequels. “The reason for that is I will never allow any sequel to be made, because it’s not that kind of film,” she said. “I don’t care how much I’m offered, it’s just not going to happen.”

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