How Many Solar Eclipses Will You Be Able to See In Your Lifetime?

iStock
iStock

Total solar eclipses, when our view of the Sun is completely blocked out by the Moon, are highly anticipated events. The one appearing over much of the U.S. on August 21 may end up becoming the most-viewed celestial event in history. If you miss this summer's, though, will you ever see another? Denise Lu at The Washington Post can tell you just how many other chances you'll get.

Just put your birth year into the Post's eclipse calculator, and it will tell you how many total solar eclipses have yet to occur worldwide before you reach 100 (assuming that you live to be exactly 100). In the graphic below, the orange line is the path of this summer's total solar eclipse. The purple lines represent future eclipses. The darker the line, the sooner it will occur.

Lines representing solar eclipse paths criss-cross the globe.

Denise Lu / The Washington Post

Though solar eclipses are relatively common worldwide, that doesn't mean they're easy to view. A total solar eclipse hasn't been visible in the contiguous United States since 1979, and the next time a total solar eclipse will pass over the entire country will be in 2045. Personally, the eclipse calculator tells me I have 50 left in my lifetime, but I'll need to move to Asia to see most of them, and unless I get on a boat and chase eclipse trajectories across the ocean, I'm bound to miss a few.

Throughout history, eclipses have proved to be powerful phenomena, and not just because looking at them can damage your eyes. In 585 BCE, a solar eclipse that occurred in the middle of a Greek battle prompted the end of a six-year war. Soldiers saw the sudden darkness in the middle of the day as a sign that they should cease their fighting.

Find out how many eclipses you have left on The Washington Post.

Attention Aspiring Astronauts: Arlo Skye Now Has Space-Themed Luggage

Arlo Skye
Arlo Skye

While some travelers are preoccupied with getting their luggage through airport security, the designers at Arlo Skye are thinking bigger. As Condé Nast Traveler reports, the brand's new line of suitcases is inspired by space travel, with high tech features and a sleek, futuristic look.

Arlo Skye was founded in 2016 by alumni from Louis Vuitton and Tumi Inc. They set out to create luggage that emphasized design, with luxury polycarbonate suitcases available in trendy colors like rose gold and custom monogramming.

The company's Space Collection may be its most stylized line yet. It comes with a removable, 10,050-milliamp-hour charger with USB C and A ports for charging phones and other devices. The chrome-colored case is 22 inches tall, 9 inches deep, and 14 inches wide and weighs 8.5 pounds empty.

Space Collection suitcase from Arlo Skye
Arlo Skye

Depending on what type of space traveler you are, you can get one of three designs laser-etched on the bottom of your luggage. There's Moon Shot, Team Human, and Occupy Mars; each engraving comes with a short ode to space and a small picture of its respective celestial body. Like other suitcases made by Arlo Skye, these bags are zipper-free and made from polycarbonate with an aluminum frame.

Whether you're a globetrotter or an aspiring astronaut, the Space Collection from Arlo Skye makes a great travel companion.

Buy it from Arlo Skye for $450.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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A Lunar Crash May Have Left Behind a Library of Human Civilization on the Moon

Matt Cardy, Getty Images
Matt Cardy, Getty Images

SpaceIL, the Israeli-based private space travel nonprofit backed by billionaire Morris Kahn, came up short in their attempt to land the first commercial payload ever delivered on the Moon. Their Beresheet lander crashed last Thursday, April 11, after a technical glitch prompted its engine to power off and then back on, causing it to come in too fast and strike the lunar surface.

While not ultimately successful, the voyage may have still managed to mark a milestone in the history of lunar exploration. The Arch Mission Foundation, which worked with SpaceIL to put a massive amount of information—including the entirety of Wikipedia—on board, announced this week that the digital library may have survived the impact. That would make it the first substantial repository of knowledge to occupy the Moon.

The data, which was dubbed the Lunar Library, holds an impressive wealth of material—the equivalent of roughly 30 million pages in all. In addition to Wikipedia, there are books selected by Project Gutenberg, 60,000 images, language keys, and a curated selection of music. All of this humanity was packed into 25 nickel discs that are each 40 microns thick. The entire library is roughly the size and shape of a DVD.

Arch Mission Foundation believes that the discs could have survived the impact based on what's known about its trajectory and the crash and is working to confirm its existence. Even if it didn't, there's still something to be said for the idea that "archaeological ruins" of human knowledge now exist there.

The Lunar Library wouldn't be the only human relic left behind. Alan Shepard, the fifth man ever to walk on the Moon in 1971, left golf balls after playing a lunar round. In 1969, the crew of Apollo 11 left a 1.5-inch silicon disk containing goodwill messages from prominent figures in 75 countries written microscopically.

SpaceIL intends to pursue a second lunar lander, with a launch date to be announced. While other countries have landed a vehicle on the Moon—the United States, China, and Russia—this would have marked the first time for a private entity.

[h/t Fast Company]

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