CLOSE
Original image
iStock

The Reason Police Officers Tap Your Taillight When They Pull You Over

Original image
iStock

Asking a driver for their license and registration is common procedure from police officers during traffic stops. There’s another practice that was once standard across the force but is more of a mystery to the people being pulled over: While approaching a driver’s window, officers will sometimes touch a car's taillight. It's a behavior that dates back decades, though there's no reason to be concerned if it happens at your next traffic stop.

Before cameras were installed on the dashboards of most police cars, tapping the taillight was an inconspicuous way for officers to leave behind evidence of the encounter, according to The Law Dictionary. If something were to happen to the officer during the traffic stop, their interaction with the driver could be traced back to the fingerprints left on the vehicle. This would help other police officers track down a missing member of the force even without video proof of a crime.

The action also started as a way for officers to spook drivers before reaching their window. A pulled-over motorist with a car full of illegal drugs or weapons might scramble to hide any incriminating materials before the officer arrives. The surprise of hearing a knock on their taillight might disrupt this process, increasing their likelihood of getting caught.

Today the risks of this strategy are thought to outweigh the benefits. Touching a taillight poses an unnecessary distraction for officers, not to mention it can give away their position, making them more vulnerable to foul play. And with dash cams now standard in most squad cars, documenting each incident with fingerprints isn’t as necessary as it once was. It’s for these reasons that some police agencies now discourage taillight tapping. But if you see it at your next traffic stop, that doesn’t mean the officer is extra suspicious of you—just that it’s a hard habit to break.

[h/t The Law Dictionary]

Original image
Galbraith
arrow
This Just In
Little Ross—a Tiny Island in Scotland With a Murderous History—Can Be Yours for $425,000
Original image
Galbraith

Just off Scotland’s southwest coast sits the island of Little Ross. While picturesque, the remote speck of land comes with a tragic backstory: the 1960 murder of a lighthouse keeper, who died at the hands of a colleague. Now, decades after the tragedy made national headlines, the Independent reports that Little Ross is officially on the market and accepting offers over £325,000 (a little under $424,000).

The 29-acre island has a natural harbor, a rocky beach, and a craggy green coastline. There's also a six-bedroom cottage and several ramshackle barns, all of which are included in the purchase. A wind turbine and solar panels provide power (although everyone knows that good ghost stories are best enjoyed by candlelight).

What’s not for sale is the island’s 19th century lighthouse, the scene of lighthouse keeper Hugh Clarke’s 1960 murder. (His assistant, Robert Dickson, was found guilty, and received life imprisonment.)

“Since automation in the late 1960s the lighthouse no longer requires full-time staffing, and only the lighthouse and Sighting Tower are maintained by the Northern Lighthouse Board,” the island's listing states. “It is anticipated that the Northern Lighthouse Board and the purchasers will share the use, and future maintenance of the jetty wall.”

Since Ross Island is only accessible by boat or air, the listing advises that potential buyers be “proficient seamen” (or have access to a helicopter). Fit the bill, and in the market for an unconventional getaway? Check out the pictures below, or visit the island’s listing for more information.

The island of Little Ross, which sits off the Meikle Ross headland on Scotland’s south coast.
Galbraith

The island of Little Ross, which sits off the Meikle Ross headland on Scotland’s south coast.
Galbraith

[h/t Independent]

Original image
iStock
arrow
History
New Series Explores the Question: Was H.H. Holmes Also Jack the Ripper?
Original image
iStock

In the nearly 130 years since the Whitechapel murders, a plethora of officials, amateur detectives, writers, and scholars have come up with different theories about Jack the Ripper’s true identity. While so far none have been proven, a new History Channel series will dive deep into one of the more out-there ideas currently circulating. As Entertainment Weekly reports, American Ripper will follow the relative of a contemporaneous American serial killer on the hunt to prove that his great-great-grandfather left a life of crime in the U.S. to become London’s Jack the Ripper.

Dr. Henry Howard Holmes, better known as H.H. Holmes, was a famous American serial killer who murdered at least nine people, primarily women who visited his Chicago hotel during the 1893 World’s Fair. Holmes’s great-great-grandson, Jeff Mudgett, alleges that diaries he inherited from the doctor prove that Holmes, who was reportedly in London during the Whitechapel murders, was also Jack the Ripper. The eight-part History Channel series posits that Holmes escaped his execution in the U.S. and went on to become the UK’s most notorious serial killer, committing up to 200 murders in total while evading authorities.

Mudgett, a lawyer, has been researching Holmes since he first discovered their relationship two decades ago. He and his team exhumed Holmes’s body to get a DNA sample in order to test the theory that it was not Holmes who was executed and buried in April 1896. Mudgett isn’t the first to wonder about the true identity of the body buried in Holmes’s grave; in the immediate aftermath of his death, there were already conspiracy theories spreading that the infamous murderer was very much alive, and had managed to flee the country.

But then the timeline gets a little fuzzy. Jack the Ripper is believed to have killed at least five women in London’s East End in 1888, and could possibly be linked to even more murders in the area up until 1891 (though these could have been the work of another killer or killers). Holmes was arrested in 1894. So if he was also Jack the Ripper, he would have committed the Whitechapel murders before, not after, he was sentenced to death for the killings in his Chicago “Murder Castle.”

There are other potential American links to Jack the Ripper that go beyond Holmes, though. Some experts believe that Jack the Ripper could have been another identity of the “Servant Girl Annihilator," who murdered eight people in Austin, Texas in the 1880s. The (still unsolved) murders ended in 1885, just a few years before Jack the Ripper began terrorizing London.

Whether or not Mudgett's hunch turns out to be true, Holmes has already made an indelible mark on pop culture. He was the subject of Erik Larson’s 2003 bestselling book The Devil in the White City, which Leonardo DiCaprio purchased the film rights to in 2010. Though it's still listed as being in development, Martin Scorsese is attached to direct, and said the script was still being worked on in December 2016.

Tune into the History Channel on July 11 at 10/9 c to catch the first episode of American Ripper, and evaluate the evidence for the H.H. Holmes/Jack the Ripper connection for yourself.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios