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SFMOMA
Beyond My Ken, Wikimedia Commons // GFDL

San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art Will Text You Art on Demand

SFMOMA
SFMOMA
Beyond My Ken, Wikimedia Commons // GFDL

The Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco is home to thousands of artworks spanning different styles and media. But if you already know what flavor of SFMOMA art you’re in the mood to see, there’s now a way to view it without leaving home. As Engadget reports, the new “Send Me SFMOMA” project allows art lovers to request on-demand images from the museum via text message.

To take advantage of the promotion, you can text 572-51 with the message “Send me…” followed by a feeling, color, or object. Texting “send me birds,” for example, sometimes brings up Rigo 00 (now Rigo 23)’s 2000 piece Lost Rascal depicting a missing cockatiel. Texting “send me sunshine” might show Robert Bechtle’s summery 1977 painting Watsonville Olympia.

The bot even responds to certain emojis, like an ocean wave (this could give you Pseudo Reportage by Nobuyoshi Araki) or a bouquet of flowers (which might turn up Yasumasa Morimura’s An Inner Dialogue with Frida Kahlo [Collar of Thorns]).

SFMOMA doesn’t expect anyone to use the service to browse all 34,678 items in the collection, which is partly the point. By sending one image at a time, recipients are given more time to spend with each one than they may have had in the museum.

“In a world oversaturated with information, we asked ourselves: how can we generate personal connections between a diverse cross section of people and the artworks in our collection?” a statement from SFMOMA reads. “Send Me SFMOMA was conceived as a way to bring transparency to the collection while engendering further exploration and discussion among users.”

Messages sent to SFMOMA may still qualify for local carrier charges, and they only work within the U.S. To explore more artworks from home you can visit SFMOMA’s vast digital collection on its website.

[h/t Engadget]

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Weather Watch
Heated Mats Keep Steps Ice-Free in the Winter
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Amazon

The first snow of the season is always exciting, but the magic can quickly run out when you remember all the hazards that come with icy conditions. Along with heating bills, frosted cars, and other pains, the ground develops a coat of ice that can be dangerous for pedestrians and drivers alike. Outdoor steps become particularly treacherous and many people find themselves clutching their railings for fear of making it to the bottom headfirst. Instead of putting salt down the next time it snows, consider a less messy approach: heated mats that quickly melt the ice away.

The handy devices are made with a thermoplastic material and can melt two inches of snow per hour. They're designed to be left outside, so you can keep them ready to go for the whole winter. The 10-by-30-inch mats fit on most standard steps and come with grips to help prevent slipping. A waterproof connector cable connects to additional mats so up to 15 steps can be covered.

Unfortunately, this convenience comes at a price: You need to buy a 120-volt power unit for them to work, and each mat is sold separately. Running at $60 a mat, the price can add up pretty quickly. Still, if you live in a colder place where it's pretty much always snowing, it might be worth it.

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Afternoon Map
Monthly Internet Costs in Every Country

Thanks to the internet, people around the world can conduct global research, trade tips, and find faraway friends without ever leaving their couch. Not everyone pays the same price for these digital privileges, though, according to new data visualizations spotted by Thrillist.

To compare internet user prices in each country, cost information site HowMuch.net created a series of maps. The data comes courtesy of English market research consultancy BDRC and Cable.co.uk, which teamed up to analyze 3351 broadband packages in 196 nations between August 18, 2017 and October 12, 2017.

In the U.S., for example, the average cost for internet service is $66 per month. That’s substantially more than what browsers pay in neighboring Mexico ($27) and Canada ($55). Still, we don’t have it bad compared to either Namibia or Burkina Faso, where users shell out a staggering $464 and $924, respectively, for monthly broadband access. In fact, internet in the U.S. is far cheaper than what residents in 113 countries pay, including those in Saudi Arabia ($84), Indonesia ($72), and Greenland ($84).

On average, internet costs in Asia and Russia tend to be among the lowest, while access is prohibitively expensive in sub-Saharan Africa and in certain parts of Oceania. As for the world’s cheapest internet, you’ll find it in Ukraine and Iran.

Check out the maps below for more broadband insights, or view HowMuch.net’s full findings here.

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

[h/t Thrillist]

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