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SFMOMA
Beyond My Ken, Wikimedia Commons // GFDL

San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art Will Text You Art on Demand

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SFMOMA
Beyond My Ken, Wikimedia Commons // GFDL

The Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco is home to thousands of artworks spanning different styles and media. But if you already know what flavor of SFMOMA art you’re in the mood to see, there’s now a way to view it without leaving home. As Engadget reports, the new “Send Me SFMOMA” project allows art lovers to request on-demand images from the museum via text message.

To take advantage of the promotion, you can text 572-51 with the message “Send me…” followed by a feeling, color, or object. Texting “send me birds,” for example, sometimes brings up Rigo 00 (now Rigo 23)’s 2000 piece Lost Rascal depicting a missing cockatiel. Texting “send me sunshine” might show Robert Bechtle’s summery 1977 painting Watsonville Olympia.

The bot even responds to certain emojis, like an ocean wave (this could give you Pseudo Reportage by Nobuyoshi Araki) or a bouquet of flowers (which might turn up Yasumasa Morimura’s An Inner Dialogue with Frida Kahlo [Collar of Thorns]).

SFMOMA doesn’t expect anyone to use the service to browse all 34,678 items in the collection, which is partly the point. By sending one image at a time, recipients are given more time to spend with each one than they may have had in the museum.

“In a world oversaturated with information, we asked ourselves: how can we generate personal connections between a diverse cross section of people and the artworks in our collection?” a statement from SFMOMA reads. “Send Me SFMOMA was conceived as a way to bring transparency to the collection while engendering further exploration and discussion among users.”

Messages sent to SFMOMA may still qualify for local carrier charges, and they only work within the U.S. To explore more artworks from home you can visit SFMOMA’s vast digital collection on its website.

[h/t Engadget]

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Google Maps Is Getting a Makeover With More Icons and Colors
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Prepare to get used to some big changes to your Google Maps app. The tech giant announced in a blog post that it’s changing the tool’s design to better highlight information that’s relevant to your journey.

The first update can be seen when switching between modes of transportation. If you’re driving from your home to work, for example, Maps will show you gas stations along your route, but switch to public transit and train stations will pop up instead.

The app’s color scheme has also been given a makeover. All points of interest (POI) that appear on the map are now color-coded. Looking for the nearest restaurant? Food and drink POI are orange. Need some retail therapy? Shopping icons are blue. Hospitals (pink), churches (gray), outdoor spaces (green), and more are included in the new system.

Within the larger categories, Google has introduced dozens of specialized icons to indicate subcategories. Banks are marked with a dollar sign, cafes with a coffee cup, etc.

“The world is an ever-evolving place,” Google Maps product manager Liz Hunt wrote in the blog post. “Now, we’re updating Google Maps with a new look that better reflects your world, right now.”

This overhaul is the latest way Google Maps is evolving to make life more convenient for its users. In the past year, the app has rolled out features that allow you to locate your parked car and to check how crowded attractions are at certain times. The new design changes will start appearing over the next few weeks.

Phones with maps app open.
Google

Color key for Google Maps.
Google

Icons for Google Maps.
Google
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Facebook Just Made It Easier to Tell the Difference Between Fake News and Real Reporting
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On Facebook, fake news stories "reporting" international conflicts over Toblerones can appear alongside fact-checked journalism from trustworthy outlets. This leads to some bogus stories racking up thousands of shares while real news stories are deemed "fake" by those who disagree with them. With its latest news feature, Facebook aims to make the distinction between factual and fictional posts clearer.

As The Verge reports, articles shared on Facebook will now display a "trust indicator" icon. Clicking on it reveals information about the publisher of the piece, including their ethics statement, corrections policy, fact-checking process, ownership structures, and masthead. By providing that context, Facebook hopes that more users will make better decisions about which news outlets to trust and which to disregard.

The social media network is launching the feature with a handful of publishers and plans to open it up to more down the road. But unless it becomes mandatory for all media pages, it won't be the end of Facebook's fake news problem: Phony sites and real publishers that leave this information blank will still look the same in the eyes of some readers. Additionally, the feature only works when people go out of their way to check it, so it requires users to be skeptical in the first place.

If you want to avoid the fake news in your feed, looking for trust indicators is a good place to start. To further sharpen your BS-detecting skills, try adopting the CRAAP system: The American Library Association has been using it to spot sketchy sources since before the Facebook era.

[h/t The Verge]

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