Jeff Topping/Getty Images
Jeff Topping/Getty Images

Which Americans Have The Longest Commutes? Take a Look

Jeff Topping/Getty Images
Jeff Topping/Getty Images

A long commute affects more than just whether or not you’ll get to work on time. Spending hours getting to and from the office (especially by car) can make you feel worse about your job and affect your health. Which U.S. areas have the most soul-crushing commutes? Chase Sawyer, a statistician who runs the visualization site Overflow Data, recently mapped out the answer, as CityLab reports.

Using data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey collected between 2011 and 2015, Sawyer created an interactive graphic that examines average commute time across the U.S. Unsurprisingly, commute times near New York City and Washington, D.C. are some of the longest. (Ditto for the Denver area.) Commute times in much of the Midwest are rather short, and in Alaska, they're virtually nonexistent.

You can play with the interactive version of the graphic on the Overflow Data site.

The data, organized by county, shows that Pike County, Pennsylvania (which is part of the New York-Newark-Jersey City metropolitan area) technically has the longest average commute time in the nation, clocking in at 44 minutes. Most of the other super-long commutes are taken by New York City workers, including in the Bronx and Brooklyn, where the average commute times are all more than 40 minutes long. Meanwhile, in some Alaskan counties, average commutes can be as short as five minutes long (meaning many people likely live and work in the same location).

Bear in mind that not every commute looks the same, and how you get to work is as important as how long it takes you. Workers in Brooklyn and the Bronx might be spending an hour on the train each way, but research has shown that workers who take public transit are much happier than those who drive. So a 40-minute commute in a metropolitan area on a train might be nowhere near as awful as a gridlocked commute in a suburban area would be. We're looking at you, Southern California.

[h/t CityLab]

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Interactive Map Shows Where Your House Would Have Been 750 Million Years Ago
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iStock

Your neighborhood traveled a long way over several hundred million years to reach the spot it occupies today. To trace that journey over the ages, check out Ancient Earth, an interactive digital map spotted by Co.Design.

Ancient Earth, a collaboration between engineer and Google alum Ian Webster and Paleomap Project creator C.R. Scotese, contains geographical information for the past 750 million years. Start at the beginning and you'll see unrecognizable blobs of land. As you progress through the ages, the land mass Pangaea gradually breaks apart to form the world map we're all familiar with.

To make the transition even more personal, you can enter your street address to see where it would have been located in each period. Five hundred million years ago, for example, New York City was a small island in the southern hemisphere isolated from any major land mass. Around the same time, London was still a part of Pangaea, and it was practically on top of the South Pole. You can use the arrows on your keyboard to flip through the eras or jump from event to event, like the first appearance of multicellular life or the dinosaur extinction.

As you can see from the visualization, Pangaea didn't break into the seven continents seamlessly. Many of the long-gone continents that formed in the process even have names.

[h/t Co.Design]

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Why Macedonia Is Getting a New Name
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iStock

For the first time since becoming an independent nation in 1991, the Republic of Macedonia is rebranding itself. As CNN reports, the Balkan nation will soon be called the Republic of Northern Macedonia, a name change that will hopefully help to heal the country's tense relationship with Greece.

Macedonia adopted its former title after gaining independence from Yugoslavia 27 years ago, and the name immediately caused conflict. Its neighbor to the south, Greece has a region of its own called Macedonia. Greece claimed that Macedonia's name suggested a sense of entitlement to territory that belonged to them and took it as an insult.

Even decades later, the bad blood stirred by the decision remained. Greece's issue with the name has even prevented Macedonia from joining the European Union and NATO. The new title, which was agreed upon by Macedonian prime minister Zoran Zaev and Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras on June 11, is meant to be a step towards better relations between the two countries.

"Our bid in the compromise is a defined and precise name, the name that is honorable and geographically precise—Republic of Northern Macedonia," Prime Minister Zaev said at a press conference, as reported by Reuters. Macedonia will hold a popular vote to officially change the name in a referendum later this year.

A country changing its name isn't uncommon, but reasons for the revision vary. In April 2018, the country formerly known Swaziland announced it would be called eSwatini, the name it went by prior to British colonization.

[h/t CNN]

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