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WATCH: Why a Soaking-Wet Washcloth Doesn't Drip in Space

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By Chris Gayomali

The cramped micro-gravitational confines of the International Space Station are great if you're the kind of person who loves spicy food or wants a longer lifespan. But the ISS is also fertile testing ground for all sorts of strange and compelling experimentation. In the video below, part of a live taping for high school students watching from Nova Scotia, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield demonstrates what it's like to wring out a soaking-wet washcloth when the familiar properties of gravity are removed from the equation. 

You can't just dip a towel in a sink or bucket to get it wet; the water molecules would just float up into the air. (Think of the I.S.S. as in a perpetual state of free fall — that's why everything flies around.) So, after simultaneously juggling a water bag, washcloth, and microphone, Hadfield shows the class what happens when he clenches his fingers and forcibly squeezes H2O out of a cloth. The result is hypnotizing.

"The water squeezes out of the cloth, then because of the surface tension of the water, it runs along the surface of the cloth and up into my hand," he says. "It's almost as if you had Jell-O on your hand."

Hadfield's towel-wringing experiment is just the latest broadcast from the I.S.S. Previously, he showed us why shedding tears in outer space might not be such a good idea after all:

Lucky for the the crew aboard the space station, taking a sponge bath is just one of two showering options: The other and admittedly more fun-sounding method involves using a nozzle to spray themselves before using a vacuum hose to suck all the water droplets off their bodies. (Via NPR)

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Opening Ceremony
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These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
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Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

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Opening Ceremony

To this:

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Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

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This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
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iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

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