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YouTube / National Wildlife Federation
YouTube / National Wildlife Federation

The Muppets Celebrate Earth Day (in 1990)

YouTube / National Wildlife Federation
YouTube / National Wildlife Federation

On April 22, 1990, the Muppets marked Earth Day with a two-hour special jam-packed with guest stars. The list is absurdly long, but I'll give you a taste -- the cast included Neil Patrick Harris, Carl Sagan, Dustin Hoffman, Tone-Loc, Will Smith, Dan Akroyd, Chevy Chase, Downtown Julie Brown, Candice Bergen, Danny DeVito, Rhea Perlman, Morgan Freeman, Queen Latifah, Jack Lemmon, Edward James Olmos, Christopher Lloyd, Rick Moranis, Martin Short, Meryl Streep, Alex Trebek, Robin Williams, and...wait for it...the casts of The Cosby Show, Cheers, Married With Children, and Golden Girls. Plus a bunch more. You get the point, though, right? Basically everybody was in this thing. Because the guest list was so long, there's relatively little Muppet material (though that material was directed by Jim Henson), but I'll take any Muppet-related Earth Day video I can get. And, shocker, the whole thing is on YouTube.

So, twenty-three years later, settle in and grab some popcorn, and enjoy this nugget from the past. Keep in mind that Jim Henson died on May 16, 1990, so this was among the last major works he lived to see on the air. Henson was a devoted environmentalist, so I can only assume that 23 years ago today, he was proud.

Part 1

Robin Williams testifies.

Part 2

Doogie Howser, M.D. tries to save Mother Earth while Murphy Brown reports, then we get into the Jeopardy! material.

Part 3

Carl Sagan drops knowledge until Danny DeVito changes the channel in favor of Dennis Miller's Weekend Update segment on SNL. Around 3:50 into this segment is a sketch written by Henson featuring Kermit and fellow swamp animals. And then Dustin Hoffman argues with Robin Williams. Oh yeah...and then E.T. shows up. What?!

Part 4

Let the 1990 TV-friendly rap number begin!

Part 5

Michael Keaton apologizes for his polluting ways, then we eventually get into some Married With Children tomfoolery.

Part 6

Meryl Streep! Kevin Costner with a ponytail! The cast of Cheers!

Part 7

Murphy Brown wraps up her reporting as everybody realizes there's something they can do to help...and then Barbra Streisand performs, before a rapid-fire set of tips from celebrities including Morgan Freeman.

The PSAs

As a final treat, here are a series of 1991 spots promoting Earth Day (for the National Wildlife Federation) featuring Kermit and various other muppets working for Frog Frog & Frog Advertising, trying to develop a catchy slogan for Earth Day.

And these are a bit earlier (late 1980s):

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Mario Tama, Getty Images
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science
Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Is Causing Another Explosive Problem: Laze
Mario Tama, Getty Images
Mario Tama, Getty Images

Rivers of molten rock aren't the only thing residents near Hawaii's Kilauea volcano have to worry about. Lava from recent volcanic activity has reached the Pacific Ocean and is generating toxic, glass-laced "laze," according to Honolulu-based KITV. Just what is this dangerous substance?

Molten lava has a temperature of about 2000°F, while the surrounding seawater in Hawaii is closer to 80°F. When this super-hot lava hits the colder ocean, the heat makes the water boil, creating powerful explosions of steam, scalding hot water, and projectile rock fragments known as tephra. These plumes are called lava haze, or laze.

Though it looks like regular steam, laze is much more dangerous. When the water and lava combine, and hot lava vaporizes seawater, a series of reactions causes the formation of toxic gas. Chloride from the sea salt mixes with hydrogen in the steam to create a dense, corrosive mixture of hydrochloric acid. The vapor forms clouds that then turn into acid rain.

Laze blows out of the ocean near a lava flow
USGS

That’s not the only danger. The lava cools down rapidly, forming volcanic glass—tiny shards of which explode into the air along with the gases.

Even the slightest encounter with a wisp of laze can be problematic. The hot, acidic mixture can irritate the skin, eyes, and respiratory system. It's particularly hazardous to those with breathing problems, like people with asthma.

In 2000, two people died in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park from inhaling laze coming from an active lava flow.

The problem spreads far beyond where the lava itself is flowing, pushing the problem downwind. Due to the amount of lava flowing into the ocean and the strength of the winds, laze currently being generated by the Kilauea eruptions could spread up to 15 miles away, a USGS geologist told Reuters.

[h/t Forbes]

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iStock
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Health
Watch a Tree Release a Massive "Pollen Bomb" Into the Air
iStock
iStock

In case your itchy, watery eyes hadn't already tipped you off, spring is in the air. Some trees release up to a billion pollen grains apiece each year, and instead of turning into baby trees, many of those spores end up in the noses of allergy sufferers. For a visual of just how much pollen is being released into our backyards, check out the video below spotted by Gothamist.

This footage was captured by Millville, New Jersey resident Jennifer Henderson while her husband was clearing away brush with a backhoe. He noticed one tree was blanketed in pollen, and decided to bump into it to see what would happen. The result was an explosion of plant matter dramatic enough to make you sniffle just by looking at it.

"Pollen bombs" occur when the weather starts to warm up after a prolonged winter, prompting trees and grasses to suddenly release a high concentration of pollen in a short time span. Wind, temperature, and humidity levels all determine the air's pollen count for any given day, but allergy season settles down around May.

After determining that your congestion is the result of allergies and not a head cold, there are a few steps you can take to stave off symptoms before they appear. Keep track of your area's pollen report throughout the week, and treat yourself with antihistamines or nasal spray on days when you know it will be particularly bad outside. You can also keep your home a pollen-free zone by closing all the windows and investing in an air purifier. Check out our full list of seasonal allergy-fighting tips here.

[h/t Gothamist]

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