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PLP Architecture

London Skyscraper to Feature a Glass Climbing Wall With Dizzying Views

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PLP Architecture

Residents of a new skyscraper going up in London will have a chance to see their city from an entirely new perspective. As Konbini reports, the TwentyTwo tower in the ward of Bishopsgate will include a large glass window that doubles as a rock climbing wall.

The installation will be located indoors, 410 feet above ground level. Like a traditional climbing wall, the glass will be studded with holds of different shapes and sizes. But instead of facing an opaque surface, climbers will look out onto sweeping views of London.

View of London skyscrapers at night.
PLP Architecture

The TwentyTwo is the latest building to take advantage of its height with a vertigo-inducing amenity. In 2016, Market Square Tower in Houston opened a glass-bottomed pool that hangs 500 feet above the street. A few months before that, the U.S. Bank Tower in Los Angeles unveiled a clear “skyslide” that hugs the building’s 70th floor.

When construction on the high-rise wraps sometime before 2019, there will be plenty of relaxing features—like a spa, juice bar, and outdoor terrace—for residents to enjoy. The glass climbing wall will also be available should they want to test their nerves.

[h/t Konbini]

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Castle Rock Entertainment
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Brush Up on Your Film Trivia With This Website Dedicated to First and Last Lines From Popular Movies
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Castle Rock Entertainment

Few elements of a film are more important than its opening and closing lines. In some cases, they divulge pivotal truths or serve as bookends to establish the movie’s overall tone. In others, they provide important context or reveal key information about the lead characters.

No matter which purpose these snippets of dialogue serve, the most iconic establishing or concluding film lines are perhaps the most quotable ones. (After all, how many Citizen Kane fans can hear the phrase “Rosebud” without being reminded of Kane’s favorite childhood sleigh?) But if you can’t remember the openers and closers from your own favorite flicks, a new website is here to help you brush up on your pop culture knowledge.

Made by the team over at AT&T Internet, the fun reference site takes iconic blockbusters and presents their first and last lines of dialogue using typography and the occasional illustration. The site “is a way to recap the last 50 years of movies into a slideshow,” communications manager Alex Thomas tells Mental Floss.

You can check out AT&T Internet’s online slideshow of first and last lines—featuring bits from 1972’s The Godfather, 1999’s The Sixth Sense, 1994's The Shawshank Redemption, and more—here.

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iStock
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Watch Craftsmen Shape Gobs of Molten Glass into Colorful Marbles
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iStock

Marbles aren't just for schoolchildren. Humans have likely been playing with the tiny toys for thousands of years, as indicated by ancient Egyptian artifacts and other objects studied by archaeologists. These trinkets have been crafted from materials including clay, stone, wood, glass, and metal. But in the early 1900s, Akron, Ohio–based Martin F. Christensen changed the way the playthings are made when he invented an automated machine that produced glass marbles.

Christensen's machine ultimately paved the way for the mass production of marbles. But in the video below, you can see how they're made the old-fashioned way. Produced by The Magic of Making—a series of short educational films created along with BBC—and spotted by The Kid Should See This, the clip shows glass makers in action as they use large ovens to melt granules of sand into liquid, and as they stretch, twist, and shape the molten goo into fragile (yet still playable) creations.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

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