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A Record Heatwave in the Southwest Grounds Planes

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The first week of summer is getting off to an especially hot start in the American Southwest. According to ABC News, temperatures reached 118°F on Monday, June 19, tying the regional record for that day set last year. Today, Tuesday, June 20, the mercury is expected to climb even higher, and airlines in Phoenix are canceling flights as a precaution.

American Airlines grounded close to 50 flights scheduled to take off from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix Tuesday morning, The Arizona Republic reports. With the National Weather Service predicting highs of 119°F, the Bombardier CRJ aircraft used by the airline for regional flights has been deemed unfit to travel.

The maximum operating temperature of the Bombardier CRJ aircraft is 118°F—at that point, experts worry that the air is no longer dense enough for the plane to take off and fly efficiently. Extreme heat isn’t a common problem for airlines, with temperatures approaching the 120s in the Southwest less than one day a year on average. But this summer is already shaping up to be one for the record books. Above-average heat is projected to scorch the region from now through September. The forecast fits into a recent trend of intense Southwestern summers which scientists believe are connected to climate change.

While many local flyers will be inconvenienced by the heat today, travelers flying beyond Arizona can expect a smooth trip. Larger jets, like Boeing and Airbus, have maximum operating temperatures of 126°F and 127°F, respectively—higher than any temperature that's been recorded in Phoenix to date.

[h/t ABC News]

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Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
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Weather Watch
It's So Cold In One Part of Russia That People's Eyelashes Are Freezing
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Oymyakon, a rural village in the eastern Russian region of Yakutia, is one of the coldest inhabited spots in the world. While some schools in the U.S. cancel classes as temperatures approach zero, schools in Oymyakon remain open in -40°F weather. But recently temperatures in the region have dropped too low even for seasoned locals to handle. As AP reports, the chill, which hit -88.6°F on January 16, is cold enough to break thermometers and freeze eyelashes.

Photos shared by residents on social media show the mercury in thermometers hovering at -70°F, the lowest temperature some are built to measure. When thermometers fail, people in Oymyakon have other ways of gauging the cold. Their uncovered eyelashes can freeze upon stepping outside. Hot water tossed in the air will also turn to snow before hitting the ground.

To Oymyakon's 500-odd citizens, the most recent cold snap is nothing out of the ordinary. Temperatures are perpetually below freezing there from late October to mid-May, and average temperatures for the winter months frequently reach −58 °F. On Tuesday, residents were advised to stay inside and stay as warm as possible. Of course, that directive wasn't enough to stop some adventurous locals from sneaking outside for selfies.

[h/t AP]

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Amazon
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Weather Watch
Heated Mats Keep Steps Ice-Free in the Winter
Amazon
Amazon

The first snow of the season is always exciting, but the magic can quickly run out when you remember all the hazards that come with icy conditions. Along with heating bills, frosted cars, and other pains, the ground develops a coat of ice that can be dangerous for pedestrians and drivers alike. Outdoor steps become particularly treacherous and many people find themselves clutching their railings for fear of making it to the bottom headfirst. Instead of putting salt down the next time it snows, consider a less messy approach: heated mats that quickly melt the ice away.

The handy devices are made with a thermoplastic material and can melt two inches of snow per hour. They're designed to be left outside, so you can keep them ready to go for the whole winter. The 10-by-30-inch mats fit on most standard steps and come with grips to help prevent slipping. A waterproof connector cable connects to additional mats so up to 15 steps can be covered.

Unfortunately, this convenience comes at a price: You need to buy a 120-volt power unit for them to work, and each mat is sold separately. Running at $60 a mat, the price can add up pretty quickly. Still, if you live in a colder place where it's pretty much always snowing, it might be worth it.

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