5 Theories on the Best Order to Watch the Star Wars Movies

Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

The Star Wars saga is 40 years old, and doesn’t show any signs of stopping. With the eighth entry in the series, The Last Jedi, slated to hit theaters later this year (and more Star Wars movies every year until forever), it's easy to only be interested in what’s next. But newbies have to start somewhere, which begs the question: What's the best order to watch the Star Wars movies?

In case you need a super fan’s take on some options, here are five ways to consider watching the saga.

1. EPISODE ORDER

I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII

Perhaps the least favorite order among most Star Wars fans is the go-to sequence for the guy who started it all. “Start with one. That’s the way to do it right: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,” George Lucas told Vulture in 2015. “That’s the way they’re supposed to be done.”


Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

Well, just because that’s the way it’s supposedly supposed to be done doesn’t mean you should do it that way. If you start with Episode I, Vader’s big I-am-your-father reveal in The Empire Strikes Back (arguably one of the biggest twists in movie history) turns out to be old news. The prequel plotlines assume everyone knows that Anakin turns into Darth Vader, so it’s one big anticlimax. On top of that, you have to slog through the prequels before you get to the real good stuff. But if you’re still into what Lucas has to say, then give the chronological order a whirl.

2. THE ROGUE ONE ORDER

R1, IV, V, I, II, III, VI, VII

Now that the saga is spinning off into a handful of different one-offs and character-based prequels, any particular order to watch the Star Wars movies will eventually be entirely subjective. But since Rogue One is so closely tied to the primary saga’s Death Star story, Reddit threads and Star Wars fan sites have declared it the best way to initially dive into the multifaceted universe regardless of any future standalone movies. Plus, if you use the Rogue One Order and take a quick post-Empire pause to flashback to The Phantom Menace, it keeps the Skywalker lineage surprises—with Vader and Leia—intact.

3. THE TIME MACHINE ORDER

IV*, V*, VI*, I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX

This one is for diehards only, mostly because it’s basically impossible to replicate.

Now-out-of-print theatrical cuts of the Original Trilogy haven’t been re-released since 2006, and Disney hasn’t made any indication that they’ll see the light of day going forward. But if you get your hands on something like the Despecialized Editions—painstaking bootleg reconstructions of the original films—the so-called Time Machine Order puts you back as a viewer in 1977 to discover the magic all over again.


Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

First you watch the theatrical cuts of the Original Trilogy without all the Special Edition tweaks from the '90s (bad CGI Jabba, anyone?) and no Hayden Christensen showing up at the end of Return of the Jedi. Then you shift to the prequels and deal with all that before heading back to the Special Editions and the new Sequel Trilogy and beyond, starting with The Force Awakens. It’s the complete Star Wars package.

4. THE THEATRICAL RELEASE ORDER

IV, V, VI, I, II, III, VII, VIII, IX

The most obvious and easy way to experience the saga is also the most pure—warts and all. Even if the only officially released versions have the Special Edition add-ons (Greedo still shoots first), there’s nothing like kicking off the saga with A New Hope, dipping into qualitative depression with the prequels, and rocketing back into gear with The Force Awakens like the Millennium Falcon jumping into hyperspace.

5. THE MACHETE ORDER

IV, V, II, III, VI, VII, VIII, IX

First proposed by computer software blogger Rod Hilton in 2011, the Machete Order has taken on legendary status among Star Wars fans because the sequence drops enough of the bad stuff in the saga while amplifying the good stuff. You gotta take a little Dark Side with the Light Side, after all.


Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

The Machete Order refocuses the broad space opera story by focusing the movie structure on Luke, and skips over The Phantom Menace altogether, tucking Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith after The Empire Strikes Back. Sorry, Darth Maul fans, you’re out of luck—but there’s little-to-no Jar Jar Binks in this sequence, and it cuts out the whiny version of little Anakin that basically undermines the fact that he’s going to become the galaxy’s most feared villain. If you want a full story that befits the adventurous wonder of the galaxy far, far away, then the Machete Order is the best viewing experience.

George R.R. Martin Doesn't Think Game of Thrones Was 'Very Good' For His Writing Process

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

No one seems to have escaped the fan fury over the finals season of Game of Thrones. While likely no one got it quite as bad as showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, even author George R.R. Martin—who wrote A Song of Ice and Fire, the book series upon which the show is based, faced backlash surrounding the HBO hit. The volatile reaction from fans has apparently taken a toll on both Martin's writing and personal life.

In an interview with The Guardian, the acclaimed author said he's sticking with his original plan for the last two books, explaining that the show will not impact them. “You can’t please everybody, so you’ve got to please yourself,” he stated.

He went on to explain how even his personal life has taken a negative turn because of the show. “I can’t go into a bookstore any more, and that used to be my favorite thing to do in the world,” Martin said. “To go in and wander from stack to stack, take down some books, read a little, leave with a big stack of things I’d never heard of when I came in. Now when I go to a bookstore, I get recognized within 10 minutes and there’s a crowd around me. So you gain a lot but you also lose things.”

While fans of the book series are fully aware of the author's struggle to finish the final two installments, The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring, Martin admitted that part of the delay has been a result of the HBO series, and fans' reaction to it.

“I don’t think [the series] was very good for me,” Martin said. “The very thing that should have speeded me up actually slowed me down. Every day I sat down to write and even if I had a good day … I’d feel terrible because I’d be thinking: ‘My God, I have to finish the book. I’ve only written four pages when I should have written 40.'"

Still, Martin has sworn that the books will get finished ... he just won't promise when.

[h/t The Guardian]

Attention Movie Geeks: Cinephile Is the Card Game You Need Right Now

Cinephile/Amazon
Cinephile/Amazon

If you’ve got decades worth of movie trivia up in your head but nowhere to show it off, Cinephile: A Card Game just may be your perfect outlet. Created by writer, art director, and movie expert Cory Everett, with illustrations by Steve Isaacs, this game aims to test the mettle of any film aficionado with five different play types that are designed for different skill and difficulty levels.

For players looking for a more casual experience, Cinephile offers a game variety called Filmography, where you simply have to name more movies that a given actor has appeared in than your opponent. For those who really want to test their knowledge of the silver screen, there’s the most challenging game type, Six Degrees, which plays like Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon, with the player who finds the fewest number of degrees between two actors getting the win.

When you choose actors for Six Degrees, you’ll do so using the beautifully illustrated cards that come with the game, featuring Hollywood A-listers past and present in some of their most memorable roles. You’ve got no-brainers like Uma Thurman in Kill Bill (2003) and Arnold Schwarzenegger in Total Recall (1990) alongside cult favorites like Bill Murray from 2004's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and Jeff Goldblum in The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984). Of course, being a game designed for the true film buff, you’ll also get some deeper cuts like Helen Mirren from 1990’s The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover and Sean Connery in 1974's Zardoz. There are 150 cards in all, with expansion packs on the way.

Cinephile is a labor of love for Everett and Isaacs, who originally got this project off the ground via Kickstarter, where they raised more than $20,000. Now it’s being published on a wider scale by Clarkson Potter, a Penguin Random House group. You can pre-order your copy from Amazon now for $20 before its August 27 release date.

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