CLOSE
Original image
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Create Your Own Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Cutouts With a New Book

Original image
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A new book lets you recreate the intricate designs of Frank Lloyd Wright in paper. Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut Out and Fold, a forthcoming book from the London-based publisher Lawrence King, lets you fold and cut your way to architectural greatness, with templates to make paper cutouts of the famous architect’s most iconic works.

Directions for cutting and folding the Ennis House template
John Godwin

Kirigami is a Japanese art form that involves both cutting and folding paper, rather than folding alone. The book comes with templates that indicate where to cut and where to fold, with a simple four-step folding guide for each building. The results look not unlike the scale models that architects fabricate in their studios while designing buildings, though these require neither a workshop nor a 3D printer.

A white paper cut-out of Frank Lloyd Wright's Ennis House design
Lawrence King

You’ll need some dexterity with an X-Acto knife—some of those windows are intricate work—but the most delicate parts actually come pre-cut. You just remove the template from the book and work along the printed lines. In other words, you can achieve a miniature version of Frank Lloyd Wright’s genius without actually being any kind of genius.

The book includes templates for his most famous buildings, including Fallingwater and the Guggenheim Museum, as well as some buildings that may have faded from your memory, like the Ennis-Brown House, pictured above in both photographic and paper form.

Below is the Unity Temple, built in Oak Park, Illinois (where Wright lived for a large portion of his career) between 1905 and 1908.

A folded paper model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple
John Godwin

And here's the Millard House in Pasadena, California, one of Wright's first "textile block" houses.

A folded paper cut-out of Frank Lloyd Wright's Millard House
John Godwin

You can purchase the book for $20.

Cover of 'Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models'
Lawrence King

[h/t Curbed]

Original image
YouTube
arrow
school
This Russian Kindergarten Looks Just Like a Castle
Original image
YouTube

A group of lucky kindergarteners in Russia don’t have to wear poufy dresses or plastic crowns to pretend they’re royalty. As Atlas Obscura reports, all they have to do is go to school.

In a rural area of Russia's Leninsky District sits a massive, pastel-colored schoolhouse that was built to resemble Germany's famed Neuschwanstein Castle. It has turrets and gingerbread-like moldings—and instead of a moat, the school offers its 150 students multiple playgrounds, a soccer field, a garden, and playhouses.

Tuition is 21,800 rubles (about $360) a month, but the Russian government subsidizes it to make it less expensive for parents. As for the curriculum: it’s designed to promote social optimism, and each month’s lesson plan is themed. (September, for example, will be career-focused.)

Take a video tour of the school below, or learn more on the school’s website.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

Original image
YouTube
arrow
architecture
This Chinese Library's Interior Is Designed to Look Like an Infinite Tunnel of Books
Original image
YouTube

The Chinese city of Yangzhou is known for its graceful arched bridges and proximity to the Yangtze River and the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal. Architects kept these unique local features in mind while designing Zhongshuge Yangzhou, a new bookstore and library that was completed in 2016.

Designed by Shanghai studio XL-Muse Architects, the building has black, mirrored floors and arched ceilings that symbolize Yangzhou’s famous waterways and overpasses. The floor reflects the store’s curving shelves to create the illusion of a never-ending tunnel of books—a true bibliophile’s dream.

Learn more about Yangzhou’s unique library/bookstore below, courtesy of Great Big Story.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios