100 Years After It Sank, This Coast Guard Ship Will Remain in Its Watery Grave

NOAA/USCG/Video Ray
NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

On June 13, 1917, a United States Coast Guard ship named the McCulloch sank off the coast of Southern California. Now, 100 years after the vessel met its end, the Associated Press reports that the military ship has been discovered at the bottom of the Pacific.

The USCGC McCulloch was part of the Asiatic Squadron, a group of U.S. Navy warships that fought in the 1898 Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War. At the time, it was the largest cutter ever built, and the first boat of its kind to sail through the Suez Canal and the Indian Ocean [PDF].

The USCGC McCulloch sunk 100 years ago, on June 13, 1917.
Mare Island Museum

In April 1917, during World War I, the USCGC McCulloch was transferred to the Navy for duty. Two months later, while patrolling the foggy coastline, the boat collided with a steamship named the SS Governor. The USCGC McCulloch’s crew escaped, but the boat itself wasn't so lucky: In just 35 minutes, it sank to the ocean’s bottom. One crewman died; the rest were rescued.

The USCGC McCulloch sat undisturbed in its watery grave for nearly a century. But last fall, during a routine survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Coast Guard located the wreck three miles off the coast of Point Conception, California. Officials announced the discovery on Tuesday, on the 100th anniversary of the ship’s sinking.

Wreckage of the USCGC McCulloch, which sunk 100 years ago on June 13, 1917.
NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

Wreckage of the USCGC McCulloch, which sunk 100 years ago on June 13, 1917.
NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

Wreckage of the USCGC McCulloch, which sunk 100 years ago on June 13, 1917.
NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

Wreckage of the USCGC McCulloch, which sunk 100 years ago on June 13, 1917.
NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

Officials said they don’t plan on moving the fragile boat, as the ocean's strong currents and thick clouds of sediment would make it difficult to do so without significantly damaging it. Instead, the USCGC McCulloch will sit on the sea floor for eternity as "a symbol of hard work and sacrifice of previous generations to serve and protect our nation,” Coast Guard commander Todd Sokalzuk reportedly said in his announcement.

[h/t Associated Press]

Mastodon Bones Have Been Discovered by Sewer Workers in Indiana

Thomas Quine, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Thomas Quine, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

When something unexpected happens during a sewer system project, the news is not usually pleasant. But when workers installing pipes in Seymour, Indiana stopped due to an unforeseen occurrence, it was because they had inadvertently dug up a few pieces of history: mastodon bones.

According to the Louisville Courier Journal, workers fiddling with pipes running through a vacant, privately owned farm in Jackson County happened across the animal bones during their excavation of the property. The fossils—part of a jaw, a partial tusk, two leg bones, a vertebrae, a joint, some teeth, and a partial skull—were verified as belonging to a mastodon by Ron Richards, the senior research curator of paleobiology for the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites. The mastodon, which resembled a wooly mammoth and thrived during the Ice Age, probably stood over 9 feet tall and weighed more than 12,000 pounds.

The owners of the farm, the Nehrt and Schepman families, plan to donate the bones to the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis if the museum committee decides to accept them. Previously, mastodon bones were found in Jackson County in 1928 and 1949. The remains of “Fred the Mastodon” were discovered near Fort Wayne in 1998.

[h/t Louisville Courier Journal]

Middle School Student Discovers Megalodon Tooth Fossil on Spring Break

iStock.com/Mark Kostich
iStock.com/Mark Kostich

A few million years ago, the megalodon was the most formidable shark in the sea, with jaws spanning up to 11 feet wide and a stronger bite than a T. Rex. Today the only things left of the supersized sharks are fossils, and a middle school student recently discovered one on a trip to the beach, WECT reports.

Avery Fauth was spending spring break with her family at North Topsail Beach in North Carolina when she noticed something buried in the sand. She dug it up and uncovered a shark tooth the length of her palm. She immediately knew she had found something special, and screamed to get her family's attention.

Her father recognized the megalodon tooth: He had been searching for one for 25 years and had even taught his three daughters to scour the sand for shark teeth whenever they went to the beach. Avery and her sisters found a few more shark teeth that day from great whites, but her megalodon fossil was by far the most impressive treasure from the outing.

Megalodons dominated seas for 20 million years before suddenly dying out 3 million years ago. They grew between 43 and 82 feet long and had teeth that were up to 7.5 inches long—over twice the size of a great white's teeth. They're thought to be the largest sharks that ever lived.

Megalodon teeth have been discovered on every continent except Antarctica, but they're still a rare find. Avery Fauth plans to keep her fossil in a special box at home.

[h/t WECT]

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