Daniel Radcliffe’s Clever Trick for Evading Paparazzi

BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images
BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images

Being hounded by paparazzi dedicated to snapping a photo of every inane part of celebrity life is a given when you’re famous. But that doesn’t mean that most celebrities enjoy it. Some decide to avoid basically any public space, only fly in private jets, and hide behind hats, hoodies, and sunglasses. Dustin Hoffman, notably, likes to hide behind trees, while Taylor Swift occasionally walks backwards or sideways so that photographers can’t get an image of her face.

But the most effortless way to stymie the paparazzi, Daniel Radcliffe found during his 2007 performance in Equus, was to make sure photos of him were as boring as possible. The paparazzi waiting for him outside the theater after the play could never get a usable shot, because he was always in the same outfit.

"I would wear the same jacket and zip it up so they couldn't see what I was wearing underneath, and the same hat," he told Jay Leno in an interview on The Tonight Show. As a result, every photo looked like it had been taken on the same day, and the photographers couldn't sell them. "They became un-publishable, which was hilarious because there’s nothing better than seeing the paparazzi get really frustrated," he told Leno. He kept up the habit for the entire run of the play.

It seems like a lot less work than Leonardo DiCaprio's plan to walk around town in a mask—because people definitely still paid to see Leonardo DiCaprio eating pizza in a mask. Some famous figures also foil paparazzi by preempting the sale of photos to a magazine, posting images themselves so that the publication won’t buy them (as Anne Hathaway has been known to do).

Though celebrities have pushed for laws preventing the sale of unauthorized photos of their children, it’s still a common occurrence. The UK’s royal family has taken the opposite of Radcliffe’s approach, dressing Prince George so differently between public and private appearances that he might not be recognized. All those dapper event outfits disguise what he looks like when he’s dressed like a normal toddler. It doesn't totally work, but it might at least give him a few seconds of anonymity.

Jason Momoa is Glad Game of Thrones's Khal Drogo Only Lasted One Season

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

Although Jason Momoa had a pretty minor role in the grand scheme of Westerosi things in Game of Thrones, fans of his character Khal Drogo will attest to him being an extremely important part of the series—particularly in how he helped to shape the character of Daenerys Targaryen. But the actor, who is currently starring in Aquaman, is happy his time on the series ended when it did.

Drogo met his untimely demise in Season 1, and Momoa has no regrets about it. “I’m actually really, really happy with how it all turned out because, you know, you just can’t keep that character alive,” Momoa told the New York Daily News. “Even when I watch it, it just wouldn’t fit. Khaleesi [Daenerys] … I feel like she inherits that strength and she has to be by herself and do it that way."

Momoa also commented on how popular a character Drogo still is, adding, “Even now, people just can’t stop ... they love Khal Drogo. It’s unbelievable. Like, one season. I don’t know any other character that’s done one season out of eight or nine that people just go [wild]. I didn’t know it was going to be that big.”

Even though Momoa hasn’t been on the show for years, he’s still a huge fan of the series. “It’s the greatest show on Earth,” he stated, sharing that he and his wife Lisa Bonet are devoted fans.

There's a Prequel to How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and It's Halloween-Themed

Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

Everyone knows that the Grinch didn't care much for Christmas, but how did he feel about Halloween? We just learned that he spent All Hallows' Eve terrorizing the fine citizens of Whoville, thanks to Insider, who spotted this lesser-known prequel to How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

Titled Halloween is Grinch Night, the short animated movie ran as a television special in October 1977. Although it was designed to be a prequel to the classic Christmas special, Dr. Seuss wrote it 20 years after How the Grinch Stole Christmas, which was published in 1957.

The TV special opens with the Whos of Whoville cheerfully going about their business … until they catch a whiff of the "sour sweet wind," which tips them off that the Grinch is coming to town. The word "Halloween" is actually never spoken in the movie; it's replaced by the term "Grinch Night" throughout. Instead of a sleigh, the Grinch descends on the town with a wagon full of monsters pulled by Max. And instead of Cindy-Lou Who coming to the town's rescue, it's a little boy named Euchariah who intervenes.

In addition to the Halloween prequel, another TV special called The Grinch Grinches the Cat in the Hat aired in 1982. Although both of these specials won Emmy Awards, their impact wasn't as long-lasting as How the Grinch Stole Christmas, which was adapted into a live-action version starring Jim Carrey in 2000, and again in 2018 with a 3D animated version called The Grinch, with Benedict Cumberbatch voicing the title character.

Check out the Halloween-themed prequel in the YouTube video below, or get all three specials on Amazon with the Dr. Seus’s's Holidays on the Loose ultimate edition DVD.

[h/t Insider]

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