Crystal M
Crystal M

10 TARDIS Dresses for Fancy Occasions

Crystal M
Crystal M

Prom season is here, and wedding season is coming soon. You can put some spice into the occasion and still look drop-dead gorgeous by dressing as a TARDIS. Sure, the Time And Relative Dimension In Space vehicle is boxy, and is often mistaken for a British police call box. But that doesn't stop creative Doctor Who fans from making it into something beautiful and alluring.

1. A Peek Inside

Sasha Trabane, Jax Adele, and Andy Coyle converted Sasha's plain blue prom gown from a few years back into something special by making it a TARDIS. The flap in the front became a door to the TARDIS, which you know is bigger on the inside. Coyle painted the sci-fi interior on canvas, which is revealed when you open the door. The dress is nice without the interior, but with it, it was a sensation at the Arisia convention in Boston. Sasha's dress has its own Facebook page.

2. Marie Antoinette TARDIS

Master cosplayer Kelldar constructed a Marie Antoinette-style TARDIS dress for Dragon*con 2011. She told Geeks of Doom that it was inspired by the color of the fabric, which arrived somewhat wrong for the Marie Antionette costume she had in mind, but just perfect for a TARDIS. So she combined the ideas!

3. Pinafore

Priscilla Dawn makes a lacy pinafore-style TARDIS dress. The poufy skirt gives it an innocent yet fancy look. Another TARDIS dress is available without the lace. Each is custom-made to fit the customer.

4. Minidress

This shorter TARDIS design would fit in seamlessly with other modern prom dresses. Redditor Abcent187 posted it from a friend's Facebook page, but neglected to identify the creator.

Update: The dress was made from upcycled materials by Battlestar Jillactica, who is modeling the dress. Photograph by Rigel Bowen.

5. Gown with Rhinestones

Crystal M made this beautiful TARDIS ball gown out of 10 meters of satin, plus crinoline, netting, and 1500 rhinestones. And then there's the cute little TARDIS hat! She will wear the dress tomorrow to the Vancouver Fan Expo, then she may sell it to another Doctor Who fan. See more pictures here.

6. Hooded Gown

From LoriAnn Costume Designs, this old-fashioned TARDIS costume comes in six pieces, and includes a hood, bustle, lace-up corset, and more, so you can mix and match the components to fit the occasion. It's available at LoriAnn's Etsy shop

7. Velvet

Russian cosplayer and DeviantART member Rimudo-Blanche unveiled this luscious velvet TARDIS gown last month. It is completely handmade with many details, such as a line of TARDIS shapes around the hem, a train made of TARDIS print, and sumptuous lace and beadwork. The matching hat has both feathers and a veil. Rimudo-Blanche models it holding a sonic screwdriver and has a tiny dalek attached to her waist. See more pictures of the dress in her gallery.

8. Cincher

Let's say you've already got a nice dress, but you need to make it special for a sci-fi or costume event -or you just want to dress it up in your favorite TV show theme. Show your loyalty to Doctor Who by adding a made-to-order TARDIS cincher with skirt over your dress, complete with the proper windows and signs. It's at Corsair's Boutique at Etsy.

9. Corset

Nikki Cohen of Mayfaire Moon Costumes & Corsets designed and built the TARDIS Corset that not only puts a little kink in your Doctor Who cosplay, but also lights up! Bonus: the "windows" open up to give you a peek at the inside. Relax, that peek is a painted picture of the TARDIS interior. Pair it with a fancy skirt for a fancy dress occasion. Get a closer look with more pictures. Photograph by Hugh Casey.

10. Edwardian Steampunk

Author JM Frey designed this old-fashioned TARDIS gown and commissioned Kenneth Shelley of Strange Days Costuming to make it. The dress is full of details.

The throat-broach has a standard yale key, like the one that the Doctor gave Martha and Jack Harkness, and the belt is hung with small pieces of electronics. There’s a circuit board, knobs and handles, gears, a clock that I dismantled and aged to make it look as if it was falling apart as it dangled from my chains, and of course, a sonic screwdriver.  The belt is meant to resemble the control console.

Frey wore the dress to FutureCon 2011-2012, and in a charity calendar.

Bonus: Comic-Con Variety

This photograph by Flickr user Ewen Roberts illustrates the variety of designs that Doctor Who fans with a little creativity can come up with. These ladies attended Comic-Con in San Diego in 2011. The only thing their costumes have in common is that they are dresses that remind one of a TARDIS.

See also: 11 Functional Homemade TARDISes.

Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images
The World's Best Scrunchies Are From Zurich. Ruth Bader Ginsburg Says So.
Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images
Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images

The scrunchie is back in fashion, but for some, the hair accessory never went away. That includes Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court justice and pop culture heavyweight long known for her lacy collars and fancy jabots.

Ginsburg's longtime scrunchie look has gone underappreciated for years, but now, The Wall Street Journal reports (as we saw in The Hollywood Reporter) that her collection of the grandiose hair accessory is growing almost as large as her stockpile of trademark collars.

Where does a Supreme Court justice get her scrunchies, you ask? As you might expect, Justice Ginsburg doesn't run down to Claire's or Urban Outfitters for her hair ties. RBG fans trying to copy her look will need to grab their passports and buy a plane ticket to do so.

"My best scrunchies come from Zurich," she told The Wall Street Journal, no doubt sending a certain type of fashion-loving law student off to research flight prices to Switzerland. "Next best, London," she decreed, "and third best, Rome." (Do we think the justice pays $195 for her luxury scrunchies?)

Ginsburg—whose other trademark accessories include a purse-sized copy of the Constitution, which she carries everywhere—may not be single-handedly bringing back the '90s fashion trend, but she's certainly a great argument for the fluffy fabric hair ties being the perfect professional look. If it's good enough for the Supreme Court and visits to Congress, it's definitely good enough for the cubicle.

[h/t The Hollywood Reporter]

Pete Jelliffe, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0
Pop Culture
Glove Story: The Freezy Freakies Phenomenon of the 1980s
Pete Jelliffe, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0
Pete Jelliffe, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Kids who grew up in the northeast in the 1980s were pretty invested in a fad that might have gone unnoticed in warmer parts of the country. Cajoling their parents at department stores during shopping trips, hundreds of thousands of them came home sporting a pair of Freezy Freakies—thick winter gloves that came with a built-in parlor trick. When the temperature dipped below 40°F, an image would suddenly appear on the back part of the material.

Swany America Corporation, which made, marketed, and distributed the gloves, released more than 30 original designs beginning in 1980. There was a robot, a unicorn, rocket ships, ballerinas, rainbows, snowflakes, and various sports themes, though the “I Love Snow” image (below) may have been the most popular overall. At the height of Freezy mania, Swany was moving 300,000 pairs of gloves per year, which accounted for about 20 percent of their overall sales.

A Freezy Freakies glove before and after the temperature change
Freezy Freakies

“Boys loved the robot design,” Bruce Weinberg, Swany’s vice president and a former sales director for Freezy Freakies, tells Mental Floss. “Above 40 degrees, the image would disappear.”

The secret to the $13 Freakies was thermochromic ink, a temperature-sensitive dye that's been used in mood rings and heat-sensitive food labels and can appear translucent until it's exposed to warmer temperatures. Swany licensed the ink from Pilot, the Japanese-based pen company, after Swany CEO Etsuo Miyoshi saw the technology and thought it would be a good fit for his glove-focused operation. (Though they experimented with making luggage in the 1990s, Swany has predominantly been a manufacturer of higher-end ski gloves.)

Weinberg isn’t sure how Miyoshi settled on the “Freezy Freakies” name—the president is now retired—but says Miyoshi knew they had a hit early on. “After a few seasons, they could tell they had a winner product,” he says. Swany even put advertising dollars into TV commercials, a rare strategy for glove-makers not named Isotoner.

Pilot was able to adjust the temperature at which the ink would become transparent, or vice versa. If kids were impatient, or if it happened to be during the summer, Weinberg says it wasn’t uncommon to find Freezy Freakies stuck in the freezer so they could materialize their art design. “At trade shows, we’d do something similar with some ice or a cold soda,” he says. “All of a sudden, some ice cubes would make it change, and buyers would think that was really cool.”

The Freakies were such a hit that Swany licensed jackets and considered changing the name of the company to the same name as the glove. It’s probably just as well they didn’t: While Freakies lasted well over a decade, by the 1990s, things had cooled. In the new millennium, Swany was down to selling just a few hundred pairs a year. Color-changing ink for coffee mugs or beer cans was more pervasive, wearing down the novelty; knock-offs had also grabbed licensed cartoon characters, which Swany was never interested in pursuing.

The brand was dormant when a company named Buffoonery approached Swany in 2013 to license Freezy Freakies for a crowdfunded revival. This time, the gloves came in adult sizes for $34. The partnership has been successful, and Weinberg says Buffoonery has just signed an extension to start producing kids’ gloves.

“Parents will probably want matching ones for their kids,” Weinberg says. And both might still wind up in the freezer.


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