Watch Adam Savage Build the LEGO NASA Apollo Saturn V Rocket

iStock // seewhatmitchsee
iStock // seewhatmitchsee

In 1969, NASA launched the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. The lunar and service modules nested at the tip of a massive Saturn V rocket, a complex 111-meter Heavy Lift Vehicle. How big is that? It's 18 meters taller than the Statue of Liberty.

On June 1, LEGO released a NASA Apollo Saturn V Building Kit, featuring 1969 pieces. The assembled model is roughly 1 meter high, making it simultaneously enormous (for a LEGO kit) and tiny (relative to the rocket itself). Along with the rocket, the kit includes three astronaut minifigs (presumably representing Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin), the Eagle lunar module, the Columbia command module, and a book on Apollo history. Yes, the vehicles nest inside the top stage of the rocket.

At most outlets the kit is currently sold out. If you can't get your hands on a kit, you can watch Adam Savage along with Norm Chan and Will Smith from Tested assemble the kit on YouTube. Enjoy:

19 Common Things Science Hasn’t Figured Out

YouTube
YouTube

Whether we want to admit it or not, everyone cries. And while experience has taught us that it's a seemingly natural reaction to being either incredibly sad or incredibly happy, scientists have yet to figure out exactly why that salty discharge pours from our eye sockets when we're feeling emotional. It could be a way to bond with our fellow humans, or a way to alert someone else that something is amiss. But these are all just guesses, as weeping is just one of many everyday behaviors the world's smartest brains still haven't quite cracked the code on yet.

Join editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy as she digs into the science—or lack thereof—of 19 seemingly normal things we do that are a mystery to scientists (you can add sleeping, laughing, and hiccuping to that list, too) with the first edition of our all-new Mental Floss List Show. There's a fancy new set, a fancy new host, and plenty of mind-boggling topics we'll be discussing. So put on your smartypants and check out the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here!

A Clue on the Ceiling of Grand Central Terminal Shows How Dirty It Was 30 Years Ago

iStock.com/undercrimson
iStock.com/undercrimson

The mural above the concourse at Grand Central Terminal is one of the most gawked-at ceilings in New York City, but even daily commuters may have missed a peculiar feature. Tucked at the edge of the green and gold constellations is a rectangular black mark. The apparent blemish didn't get there by mistake: As Gothamist explains in its new series WHY?, it was left there by restorers when the ceiling was cleaned more than 20 years ago.

Prior to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's renovation of Grand Central in the 1990s, the concourse was a lot dirtier. The station itself was constructed in Manhattan in the early 1900s, and the celestial scene that's on the ceiling today was painted there in the 1940s. It took only a few decades for tobacco smoke and other pollutants to stain the mural so badly that it needed to be restored.

Using Simple Green-brand cleaning solution and cotton rags, conservators spent two years scrubbing nearly every inch of the ceiling back to its former glory; the one part they skipped was a 9-inch-by-18-inch patch in the northwest corner. Sometimes, when doing a major cleaning project, preservationists will leave a small sample of the art or artifact untouched. If the cleaning products did any damage to the paint, the patch gives future preservationists something to compare it to. It also acts as a snapshot of what the mural looked like in its old condition.

To hear more about the mural and its dirty secret, watch the video from Gothamist below.

[h/t Gothamist]

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