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Ginny's Dollhouse

16 Intricate Miniature Rooms

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Ginny's Dollhouse

Furniture is just furniture and rooms are just rooms, but when they're tiny they suddenly become fascinating and adorable.

1. A Library Within a Library


Courtesy of Tim Sidford/Sweetington

Tim Sidford makes amazing "shelf rooms" meant to be displayed between rows of books.

2. A Cupful of Czarina


Courtesy of TinyT42

This miniature of the last Russian Czarina's Mauve Room was made inside a teacup.

3. The Summer of 1885


Courtesy of Knoxville Museum of Art

This room is styled after a 19th century summer kitchen. It's part of the Knoxville Museum of Art's Thorne Rooms collection, miniatures commissioned in the 1930s and '40s by Mrs. James Ward Thorne.

4. Pretty in (Mostly) Pink


Courtesy of SDKMiniatures

This room is only 1 inch tall and 1.5 inches wide.

5. Reaching Nirvana


Courtesy of BelinaTLV

This room has a music theme—records, a guitar, and a Kurt Cobain poster on the wall.

6. Traditional in the Orient


Courtesy of DollhouseAra

An Etsy seller in Korea made this miniature room.

7. A Toasty Little Cubebot


Courtesy of Mini Modern

This designer used a Cubebot toy to make a fireplace in this mini room.

8. Ready To Go

Courtesy of DollhouseAra

Aww. It's a miniature foyer with tiny matched luggage.

9. Red Corduroy Couches? It was the '50s.

Courtesy of The Toy Box

This vintage living room furniture is the right size for a Barbie
doll. Too bad Barbie's dress doesn't match the midcentury modern look.

10. Cooking in a Cigar Box


Courtesy of JanelLovesCrafts

This rustic kitchen was made out of an old cigar box.

11. A Living Room for the Classic American


Courtesy of MiniPlacesStudio

This classic American living room is very convincing.

12. Just Right for the Dowager Countess


Courtesy of Ginny'sDollhouse

A room inspired by the drawing room of Highclere Castle, where Downton Abbey is filmed.

13. Reclaimed Wood for the Hipster


Courtesy of NapkinMaps

Reclaimed wood is apparently a selling point even for miniature people.

14. Borrowing a Little from Greece and Rome


Courtesy of Knoxville Museum of Art

This Federal era drawing room is also part of the Knoxville Museum of Art's Thorne Rooms collection.

15. A Room with a View

Courtesy of Stewf

Check out the carved wood around this diamond-paned window.

16. Inception: Miniatures Inside a Miniature Room


Courtesy of Shenghung Lin

This nursery scene has three even tinier miniatures inside it.

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IKEA
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Animals
Get IKEA's New Pet Furniture Collection for Not a Lot of Scratch
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IKEA

The biggest surprise about IKEA's newest product line is that it has taken this long to debut. This week, the North American arm of the Swedish furniture giant unveiled a new assortment of furniture designed specifically for four-legged customers. Dubbed LURVIG (Swedish for “hairy”), pet owners can now browse IKEA aisles for everything from dog beds to cat scratching posts—many of which have a distinct IKEA twist.

Their pet couch ($49.95), for example, folds out into a bed; another bed is small enough to slide under a human-sized mattress. Their “cat house on legs” ($54.95) looks like a retro TV and allows space for a cat to stalk you from behind a screen.

An assortment of IKEA pet furniture
IKEA

The retailer solicited advice from veterinarians on product design that would be functional while sitting comfortably within the IKEA aesthetic. “It is quite important for IKEA to have a pet range that fits into our normal furniture range,” Barbara Schäfer, IKEA’s product risk assessment leader, told Curbed. “As a pet owner I can say, so far, the normal pet products are quite ugly.” (Don't hold back, Barbara.)

The LURVIG line is currently being rolled out to IKEA stores, but you’ll have to be willing to be your furry pal’s personal shopper; the company doesn’t allow pets in their stores, save for service animals.

[h/t Curbed]

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IKEA
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Design
IKEA’s New Augmented Reality App Lets You Test Out Virtual Furniture in Your Home
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IKEA

No matter how much measuring and research you do beforehand, buying a piece of furniture without knowing what it will look like in your home is always a gamble. With its new augmented reality app, IKEA hopes to take some of the guesswork out of the process. IKEA Place features more than 2000 items in the Swedish retailer's inventory, and visualizing them in the space where you live is as easy as tapping a button.

As WIRED reports, IKEA Place is among the first apps to take advantage of Apple's ARKit, an augmented reality platform that debuted as part of iOS 11. iPhone and iPad owners with the latest update can download IKEA's new app for free and start browsing through home goods right away.

To use the tool, you must first select the product you wish to test out, whether it's a loveseat, a kitchen table, or a dresser. Then, with the camera activated, you can point your device at whichever space you want the item to fill and watch it appear on the screen in front of you.

According to IKEA, the 3D models are scaled with 98 percent accuracy. Factors that are hard to analyze from photos online, like shadows, lighting, and textures, are also depicted as they would appear in real life. So if a sofa that looks great under the lights of a store looks drab in your living room, or if a desk that seems tiny online doesn't fit inside your office, the app will let you know. It's the closest you can get to seeing how a piece of furniture complements a room without lugging it through the doorway.

IKEA isn't the first company to improve interior design with computerized images. Several hardware stores and furniture outlets offer their own AR apps. Other services like Modsy let customers pay to create full virtual models of their homes before populating them with 3D furniture. Even IKEA had a basic AR app prior to this one, but it was glitchy and not always accurate. This newest iteration aims to provide a more seamless shopping experience. And with the latest iOS update placing a greater emphasis on AR, you can expect to see more apps using the technology in the near future.

[h/t WIRED]

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