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Why Meteorological and Astronomical Seasons Don’t Line Up

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For many Americans, summer essentially starts after Memorial Day weekend. The school year's wrapping up, offices seem emptier, and jorts re-emerge from the depths of our closets. Yet the calendar says differently.

Technically, summer doesn’t start until after the summer solstice, usually around June 21, when most of us are already well into backyard barbecue season. But meteorologists define summer as the season running between June 1 and August 30. Why the disconnect?

There’s a difference between meteorological summer—shorts weather—and astronomical summer, which is based on where the Sun is positioned in relation to the Earth, as Weather Underground explains.

Over the course of the year, the tilt of the Earth means that one hemisphere is closer to the Sun than its counterpart for several months at a time, marking the summer season. When the Northern Hemisphere is closer, from late June to late September, the northern part of the world experiences summer, while the Southern Hemisphere—which is tilted farther away from the Sun—experiences winter. During summer months, the Sun takes a longer path across the sky, resulting in longer daylight hours. The equinoxes mark the days where the ratio of day-to-night stands at exactly 12 hours each, because the Sun is lined up with the equator.

Because the Earth doesn’t take exactly 365 days to travel around the Sun each year, the days that equinoxes and solstices fall on vary slightly year-to-year. Still, they typically take place around March 21 (spring equinox), June 21 (summer solstice), September 22 (autumnal equinox), and December 22 (winter solstice).

That variability makes it difficult to pin the seasons to calendar dates, so we have meteorological seasons. These are the times we normally think of as summer, fall, winter, and spring—the three-month chunks of time that correspond to the changes in the weather. Meteorological summer runs from June 1 to August 31, corresponding to how most people envision the season, running from about Memorial Day to about Labor Day. Fall goes from September 1 to November 30, winter from December 1 to February 28, and spring from March 1 to May 31.

The firm dates of meteorological seasons allow weather forecasters to better observe and predict weather patterns year-to-year, since they’re based on the annual temperature cycle, rather than the exact timing of the Earth’s orbit. Even if daylight hours aren’t yet at their peak in early June, temperatures are still more akin to summer than spring, so it makes sense to call it summer from a weather perspective. When it comes to compiling statistics on temperature and weather patterns for agricultural planning and business, working around the static calendar is a lot easier than trying to deal with the variability of the Sun’s position in the sky.

So yes, even though summer doesn’t technically start until June 21 at 12:24 a.m. Eastern Time, you and your jorts were onto something after all.

[h/t Weather Underground]

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Weather Watch
It Just Snowed In the Sahara for the Second Time In Less Than a Month
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The town of Aïn Séfra, Algeria might need to find a new nickname. Though it’s often referred to as “The Gateway to the Sahara,” the 137-year-old province in northwest Algeria is currently digging out from a rare—and unexpected—snowstorm that left the desert town covered in several inches of snow and battling sub-zero temperatures.

While the Daily Mail reported that “locals took to the nearby sand dunes to enjoy the unusual weather,” the strangest part of the story is that this is Aïn Séfra’s second snowfall in less than a month. On Sunday, January 7, a freak blizzard left parts of the Sahara blanketed in as much as 16 inches of snow.

This most recent storm marked the region’s fourth snowfall in nearly 40 years; in addition to January's dose of the white stuff, the area has been hit with other surprise wintry events in February 1979 and December 2016.

But North Africa isn’t the only area that’s seeing record-breaking weather events. On Saturday, February 3, 17 inches of snow fell on Moscow within 24 hours in what the country has dubbed “the snowfall of the century.” In mid-January, Oymyakon, Russia—a rural village in the Yakutia region, which is already well known as one of the coldest inhabited areas of the world—saw temperatures drop to -88.6°F, making it chilly enough to both bust thermometers and freeze people’s eyelashes. And you thought dealing with single-digit temperatures was tough!

[h/t: Daily Mail]

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Weather Watch
Record-Breaking 17 Inches of Snow Covers Moscow in 24 Hours
Vasily Maximov, AFP/Getty Images
Vasily Maximov, AFP/Getty Images

Moscow sees some of the most brutal winters of any world capital, but even locals weren't prepared for the most recent winter storm to batter the city. As Newsweek reports, a record-breaking 17 inches of snow buried Moscow within 24 hours.

Roughly 7 inches of snow fell just on Saturday, February 3, and the deluge continued through the following Sunday. The accumulation has already been dubbed the "snowfall of the century," and officials expect up to 3 additional inches to cover the ground over the next three days.

The sudden blizzard has brought life to a stand-still in the metropolis of 12 million. The mayor is warning motorists to stay off the roads as around 15,000 snowplows clear the snow. About 2000 trees have been toppled by the storm, injuring at least five people and killing one.

Even as the worst of the weather winds down, over 40,000 people in Moscow and the surrounding regions are without power. Meanwhile, traveling in and out of the city has become close to impossible: Around 100 flights are grounded at the local airport indefinitely and at least 10 have been canceled all together.

The historic snowfall hasn't stopped many of Moscow's tougher residents from venturing outside. Check out photos from the event below.

Person cross-country skiing over snow in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

Walking through a blizzard in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

Walking through the snow in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

Walking through the snow in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

[h/t Newsweek]

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