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Jared Enos, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Colorizing Old Photos Requires a Ton of Research

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Jared Enos, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Looking at a colorized photo of a long-dead historical figure can feel like stepping through a time portal. You’ve likely seen the famous portrait of Albert Einstein clasping his hands, for example, but the image is given new life when you can make out the tone of his skin and the shade of his sweater.

Colorization is a time-consuming process, and the work begins long before artists pick up their graphics tablets. As Vox reports, each hue is obsessively researched using diaries, government records, and the expertise of historians. So when you look at a professionally colorized photo, you aren’t merely looking at an artist’s interpretation of the past—you’re getting an image that’s as close as possible to the real thing.

Get an in-depth look at the craft in the video below.

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Art
This Artist Makes Portraits of Insects From the Plants They Eat
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iStock

The plant art of Montreal-based artist Raku Inoue goes way beyond flower arrangements. Inoue, who created the clothing brand Reikan Apparel, fashions intricate portraits of insects out of the plants that make up their habitats, as Laughing Squid spotted.

The series, "Natura Insects," includes butterflies made of flower petals, leaves intricately woven into moth wings, and black widows with rosemary legs. The results are delicate, innocent-looking bugs that no person could bear to squash. Inoue carefully arranges the pretty plant sculptures, then photographs them against a white background, resulting in an unexpected take on the traditional insect display cases seen in natural history museums.

If you like flower-based art, Inoue recently debuted a series in which his flower-petal figures blend into adorable illustrations of kids.

[h/t Laughing Squid]

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