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 SAM YEH, Staff // Getty Images
SAM YEH, Staff // Getty Images

Taiwanese Artist Transforms City Bus Into a Roaming Forest

 SAM YEH, Staff // Getty Images
SAM YEH, Staff // Getty Images

A florist from Taipei, Taiwan, has achieved the impossible: He’s found a way to make riding the bus through a crowded city a pleasant experience. All he had to do was drape the vehicle’s interior in carpets of moss and curtains of flowers.

The Agence-France Presse reports that the “forest bus” offered toll-free rides to commuters in Taipei for one week only. The bus ferried passengers to an art museum, a popular temple, and a night market, but the fairy tale environment made it hard to step off.

Interior of the "traveling forest" bus.
SAM YEH, Staff // Getty Images

The project was intended to give riders a brief respite from the city. From their moss-covered seats, commuters were able to soak in the sights and smells of the hanging orchids, ginger lilies, and ferns surrounding them. Designer Alfie Lin told AFP, “They can smell the scent of summer on the bus and see the vibrant green plants to feel messages from nature.”

Interior of the "traveling forest" bus.
Sam Yeh, Staff // Getty Images

Lin is known around the world for his floral art—he even gave a TED talk about the power of flowers last year. His bus was taken off the road Sunday, May 28, but at least one citizen wants to see it return as a fixture in the city. Celine Wei told AFP, “I hope it can become a regular service on a double-decker. It would become something special to Taipei.”

Interior of the "traveling forest" bus.
Sam Yeh, Staff // Getty Images

[h/t Inquirer.net]

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Even in Real Time, the Northern Lights Look Like a Beautiful Timelapse Video
iStock
iStock

Nothing compares to seeing the Northern Lights in person, but this video shared by The Kid Should See This is a pretty decent substitute. Though it may look like a timelapse, the footage hasn’t been altered or sped up at all. The undulating green lights you see below are what the aurora borealis looks like in real time.

Astro-photographer Kwon O Chul captured the footage of the meteorological phenomenon in Canada’s Northwest Territories in March 2013. The setting, the Aurora Village in Yellowknife, is a popular destination for tourists coming to see the Northern Lights up close. In the video, you can see how the camp’s glowing teepees complement the colorful ribbon of lights above.

Even if you plan your Northern Lights sightseeing trip perfectly, it’s impossible to guarantee that you’ll get a clear view of the aurora borealis on any given night, since factors like solar activity and weather conditions affect the light show’s visibility. But if you want to know what to expect when the lights are at their peak, take a look at the clip below.

You can check out more of Kwon O Chul's photography on Facebook.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

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Watch Christmas Island’s Annual Crab Migration on Google Street View
Google
Google

Every year, the 45 million or so red crabs on the remote Australian territory of Christmas Island migrate en masse from their forest burrows down to the ocean to mate, and so the female crabs can release their eggs into the sea to hatch. The migration starts during the fall, and the number of crabs on the beach often peaks in December. This year, you don’t have to be on Christmas Island to witness the spectacular crustacean event, as New Atlas reports. You can see it on Google Street View.

Watching the sheer density of crabs scuttling across roads, boardwalks, and beaches is a rare visual treat. According to the Google blog, this year’s crabtacular finale is forecasted for December 16, and Parks Australia crab expert Alasdair Grigg will be there with the Street View Trekker to capture it. That is likely to be the day when crab populations on the beaches will be at their peak, giving you the best view of the action.

Crabs scuttle across the forest floor while a man with a Google Street View Trekker walks behind them.
Google

Google Street View is already a repository for a number of armchair travel experiences. You can digitally explore remote locations in Antarctica, recreations of ancient cities, and even the International Space Station. You can essentially see the whole world without ever logging off your computer.

Sadly, because Street View isn’t live, you won’t be able to see the migration as it happens. The image collection won’t be available until sometime in early 2018. But it’ll be worth the wait, we promise. For a sneak preview, watch Parks Australia’s video of the 2012 event here.

[h/t New Atlas]

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