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What Is the Dew Point, and How Does It Relate to Humidity?

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Humidity has been a part of weather forecasts for as long as we’ve gotten our news over the air. At the beginning of most weather forecasts, our friendly neighborhood weatherperson tells us the sky conditions at the moment, the current temperature, and the relative humidity. Over the past couple of decades, though, the relative humidity has started to fall by the wayside in favor of the dew point. The dew point is a much more useful measure of how much moisture is in the air, but how does it relate to relative humidity?

The amount of water vapor in the air can dictate what kind of weather we see and how comfortable we are once we step outside. Relative humidity is technically defined as the air’s vapor pressure divided by its equilibrium vapor pressure. Equilibrium vapor pressure means that “there is no net evaporation or condensation,” according to Alistair Fraser, professor emeritus of meteorology at Penn State. At the equilibrium, otherwise known as the saturation point, water molecules are entering and leaving the condensed state at the same rate. When the relative humidity is cited as 50 percent, that means that the air is halfway to its saturation point, and that net evaporation is occurring. Warm air requires more water vapor than cool air to reach its saturation point, which is why an 85°F afternoon can get much muggier than a day that only makes it to 50°F—the latter can still be humid, sure, but it’s not like walking into a sauna.

The dew point is the temperature to which the air needs to cool down to in order to become completely saturated, or reach 100 percent relative humidity. Once the air temperature cools below its dew point, water vapor in the atmosphere will condense. This causes the relative humidity to go up and down like a roller coaster during the day. The relative humidity will go up at night when the air temperature approaches the dew point, and the relative humidity will go down as the air temperature warms farther and farther away from the dew point during the day.

The dew point is a little more abstract than the relative humidity, but it’s an effective way of telling you how much moisture is present in the air because it means the same thing no matter how warm or cold it is outside. A 40°F dew point is comfortable whether the air temperature is 60°F or 100°F. This consistency allows us to index the dew point to comfort levels, giving us a quick understanding of how muggy or pleasant it is outside.

It’s downright dry outside when the dew point is at or below the freezing point. Dew point readings between the freezing mark and about 55°F are pretty comfortable. A dew point between 55°F and 60°F is noticeably humid. It’s muggy when the dew point is above 60°F, and it’s uncomfortable outside when it ticks above 65°F. Any dew point readings above 70°F are oppressive and even dangerous, the kind of stickiness you experience in the tropics or during a brutal summer heat wave. It’s rare for the dew point to reach 80°F, but it can happen in extremely moist areas like corn fields or certain tropical areas.

The dew point and relative humidity are closely related, but the former is much more useful than the latter. Relative humidity helps meteorologists predict conditions favorable for wildfires and fog. Other than that, it’s mostly a relic of the old days that show up in weather reports out of habit. If you want to know the true measure of how comfortable or muggy it is outside, take a look at the dew point.

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Weather Watch
It Just Snowed In the Sahara for the Second Time In Less Than a Month
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The town of Aïn Séfra, Algeria might need to find a new nickname. Though it’s often referred to as “The Gateway to the Sahara,” the 137-year-old province in northwest Algeria is currently digging out from a rare—and unexpected—snowstorm that left the desert town covered in several inches of snow and battling sub-zero temperatures.

While the Daily Mail reported that “locals took to the nearby sand dunes to enjoy the unusual weather,” the strangest part of the story is that this is Aïn Séfra’s second snowfall in less than a month. On Sunday, January 7, a freak blizzard left parts of the Sahara blanketed in as much as 16 inches of snow.

This most recent storm marked the region’s fourth snowfall in nearly 40 years; in addition to January's dose of the white stuff, the area has been hit with other surprise wintry events in February 1979 and December 2016.

But North Africa isn’t the only area that’s seeing record-breaking weather events. On Saturday, February 3, 17 inches of snow fell on Moscow within 24 hours in what the country has dubbed “the snowfall of the century.” In mid-January, Oymyakon, Russia—a rural village in the Yakutia region, which is already well known as one of the coldest inhabited areas of the world—saw temperatures drop to -88.6°F, making it chilly enough to both bust thermometers and freeze people’s eyelashes. And you thought dealing with single-digit temperatures was tough!

[h/t: Daily Mail]

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Weather Watch
Record-Breaking 17 Inches of Snow Covers Moscow in 24 Hours
Vasily Maximov, AFP/Getty Images
Vasily Maximov, AFP/Getty Images

Moscow sees some of the most brutal winters of any world capital, but even locals weren't prepared for the most recent winter storm to batter the city. As Newsweek reports, a record-breaking 17 inches of snow buried Moscow within 24 hours.

Roughly 7 inches of snow fell just on Saturday, February 3, and the deluge continued through the following Sunday. The accumulation has already been dubbed the "snowfall of the century," and officials expect up to 3 additional inches to cover the ground over the next three days.

The sudden blizzard has brought life to a stand-still in the metropolis of 12 million. The mayor is warning motorists to stay off the roads as around 15,000 snowplows clear the snow. About 2000 trees have been toppled by the storm, injuring at least five people and killing one.

Even as the worst of the weather winds down, over 40,000 people in Moscow and the surrounding regions are without power. Meanwhile, traveling in and out of the city has become close to impossible: Around 100 flights are grounded at the local airport indefinitely and at least 10 have been canceled all together.

The historic snowfall hasn't stopped many of Moscow's tougher residents from venturing outside. Check out photos from the event below.

Person cross-country skiing over snow in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

Walking through a blizzard in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

Walking through the snow in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

Walking through the snow in Moscow.
Yuri Kadobnov, AFP/Getty Images

[h/t Newsweek]

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