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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Zaha Hadid’s South Beach Condo Hits the Market for $10 Million

Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

On March 31, 2016, the design world lost one of its true visionaries with the death of Zaha Hadid, the famed architect who put her distinctive mark on some of the world’s most famous buildings, including the London Aquatics Center for the 2012 Summer Olympics. Often referred to as the “Queen of the Curve,” Hadid—who was the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize and the only woman to be awarded the Royal Gold Medal in architecture by the Royal Institute of British Architects—is being honored today with a Google Doodle. But for architecture aficionados who have some cash to spare (well, a lot of cash to spare), there’s an even better way to get up close and personal with Zaha Hadid’s work: Buy her Miami Beach condo.

“Perfectly capturing the electric moods of South Beach, Zaha Hadid's private residence is sited for sunny days above a world-famous beach and nights within walking distance of equally world-class clubs and restaurants,” reads the listing for the three-bedroom, four-bathroom oceanfront condo, located within the swank W South Beach hotel. “Its enviable position wrapping the southeast edge of the dynamic, ocean-facing W hotel captures prevailing sea breezes while commanding the finest views of both ocean and beach from the height of the coconut palms.”

Measuring 2299 square feet, the condo features amazing ocean views from almost every angle, with balconies wrapping around most of the residence. And Hadid’s unique style can be seen in every detail, as she completely redesigned the condo when she purchased it in 2009.

According to The Rex Hamilton Corporation, which is listing the property, “It is well known that Zaha Hadid dearly loved living in her residence in Miami Beach and to celebrate her favorite home away from home, she filled it with her favorite extraordinary furniture creations and art which reflects the light and energy of her home. When looking at the objects she selected for her apartment, one gets a sense that they were created especially and exactly for here—in particular the dining room table and its cocktail table twin which dramatically capture the tropical sunshine from the terraces. But for Zaha Hadid it was also a place to reflect and recharge the creative batteries of arguably the most important woman architect of our era.”

For more information on the property, you can visit the full listing here, or watch the video preview below. Welcome home!

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architecture
After Four Months, a Frank Lloyd Wright House in Glencoe, Illinois Goes Back on the Market

Most architecture nerds would be thrilled to live in an original Frank Lloyd Wright house, and occasionally, they get their chance—as long as they’re willing to pay a few million dollars. As of late 2017, there were Frank Lloyd Wright homes for sale in New York, Minnesota, Ohio, Connecticut, and elsewhere for $1 million dollars or more (in some cases, way more). Sometimes, you can find a deal, though, like the $445,000 Usonian home that went on the market in Michigan in 2016.

Sadly, as Curbed reports, a newly for-sale Wright house in Glencoe, Illinois is not such a deal anymore. Only three months after its $752,000 sale, the 1914 Kier House in suburban Chicago has been renovated and is back on the market for $837,500.

Many Wright homes need a little love after decades of use. For one thing, the architect is somewhat notorious for building leaky roofs. Their small kitchens and shag carpeting are no longer quite so desirable, either.

But for many buyers and architects, restoring a Wright home is a labor of love, one that often takes several years and aims to respect the original designer’s genius while bringing the house up to modern standards. (For some of the historic homes, permanent easements also prohibit most exterior alterations, further limiting what a remodel can involve.)

The Prairie School-style house, though it has Honorary Landmark status, isn’t entirely original to Wright. It has a more modern kitchen, a new family room, and updated bathrooms (with a steam shower!). Previous owner Susan Cowen, who owned the house for a number of years and spent an undisclosed amount on refurbishing it, sold the residence in January to a pair of documentary filmmakers, according to Patch. The sale, which included a significant price drop, only took a few months. They, in turn, made a number of improvements. The owners fixed up the chimneys, boiler, and furnace, added a limestone bar separating the kitchen and dining room, and raised part of the ceiling above the stairs.

Now, four months later, it’s on sale again, and, thanks to the upgrades, a little pricier. The latest sellers may find, though, that not every Wright sale goes as quickly as their purchase. The architect’s homes are highly prized, but also known to be very difficult to sell, sometimes languishing on the market for years before finding a buyer.

[h/t Curbed]

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Peter Macdiarmid, Getty Images
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Long-Closed Part of Westminster Abbey to Open to the Public for the First Time in 700 Years
The triforium in 2009
The triforium in 2009
Peter Macdiarmid, Getty Images

On June 11, 2018, visitors to London's Westminster Abbey will get a look at a section of the historic church that has been off-limits for 700 years. That’s when the triforium, located high above the abbey floor, will open to the general public for the first time as the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Galleries, according to Condé Nast Traveler.

The 13th-century space, located 70 feet above the nave floor, had previously been used for abbey storage. (One architecture critic who visited before the renovation described it as a “glorified attic.”) After a $32.5 million renovation, it will now become a museum with killer views.

The view from the triforium looking down onto the rest of Westminster Abbey
The view from the triforium looking down toward the ground floor of the abbey
Dan Kitwood, Getty Images

To access the area, which looks out over the nave and altar, architects built a new tower, the abbey’s first major addition since 1745. The 80-foot-tall, window-lined structure will provide brand-new vantage points to look out on surrounding areas of Westminster. Inside the triforium, the windows of the galleries look out onto the Houses of Parliament and St. Margaret’s church, and visitors will be able to walk around the upper mezzanine and look down onto the ground floor of the abbey below.

The museum itself will show off objects from Westminster Abbey’s history, such as a 17th-century coronation chair for Mary II and an altarpiece from Henry III’s reign, when the triforium was first constructed. Oh, and it will also display Prince William and Kate Middleton’s marriage license, for those interested in more modern royal history.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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