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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Zaha Hadid’s South Beach Condo Hits the Market for $10 Million

Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

On March 31, 2016, the design world lost one of its true visionaries with the death of Zaha Hadid, the famed architect who put her distinctive mark on some of the world’s most famous buildings, including the London Aquatics Center for the 2012 Summer Olympics. Often referred to as the “Queen of the Curve,” Hadid—who was the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize and the only woman to be awarded the Royal Gold Medal in architecture by the Royal Institute of British Architects—is being honored today with a Google Doodle. But for architecture aficionados who have some cash to spare (well, a lot of cash to spare), there’s an even better way to get up close and personal with Zaha Hadid’s work: Buy her Miami Beach condo.

“Perfectly capturing the electric moods of South Beach, Zaha Hadid's private residence is sited for sunny days above a world-famous beach and nights within walking distance of equally world-class clubs and restaurants,” reads the listing for the three-bedroom, four-bathroom oceanfront condo, located within the swank W South Beach hotel. “Its enviable position wrapping the southeast edge of the dynamic, ocean-facing W hotel captures prevailing sea breezes while commanding the finest views of both ocean and beach from the height of the coconut palms.”

Measuring 2299 square feet, the condo features amazing ocean views from almost every angle, with balconies wrapping around most of the residence. And Hadid’s unique style can be seen in every detail, as she completely redesigned the condo when she purchased it in 2009.

According to The Rex Hamilton Corporation, which is listing the property, “It is well known that Zaha Hadid dearly loved living in her residence in Miami Beach and to celebrate her favorite home away from home, she filled it with her favorite extraordinary furniture creations and art which reflects the light and energy of her home. When looking at the objects she selected for her apartment, one gets a sense that they were created especially and exactly for here—in particular the dining room table and its cocktail table twin which dramatically capture the tropical sunshine from the terraces. But for Zaha Hadid it was also a place to reflect and recharge the creative batteries of arguably the most important woman architect of our era.”

For more information on the property, you can visit the full listing here, or watch the video preview below. Welcome home!

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Stones, Bones, and Wrecks
Buckingham Palace Was Built With Jurassic Fossils, Scientists Find
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iStock

The UK's Buckingham Palace is a vestige from another era, and not just because it was built in the early 18th century. According to a new study, the limestone used to construct it is filled with the fossilized remains of microbes from the Jurassic period of 200 million years ago, as The Telegraph reports.

The palace is made of oolitic limestone, which consists of individual balls of carbonate sediment called ooids. The material is strong but lightweight, and is found worldwide. Jurassic oolite has been used to construct numerous famous buildings, from those in the British city of Bath to the Empire State Building and the Pentagon.

A new study from Australian National University published in Scientific Reports found that the spherical ooids in Buckingham Palace's walls are made up of layers and layers of mineralized microbes. Inspired by a mathematical model from the 1970s for predicting the growth of brain tumors, the researchers created a model that explains how ooids are created and predicts the factors that limit their ultimate size.

A hand holding a chunk of oolite limestone
Australian National University

They found that the mineralization of the microbes forms the central core of the ooid, and the layers of sediment that gather around that core feed those microbes until the nutrients can no longer reach the core from the outermost layer.

This contrasts with previous research on how ooids form, which hypothesized that they are the result of sediment gathered from rolling on the ocean floor. It also reshapes how we think about the buildings made out of oolitic limestone from this period. Next time you look up at the Empire State Building or Buckingham Palace, thank the ancient microbes.

[h/t The Telegraph]

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architecture
5 Scrapped Designs for the World's Most Famous Buildings
Ker Robertson, Getty Images
Ker Robertson, Getty Images

When an architect gets commissioned to build a skyscraper or a memorial, they’re usually not the only applicant for the job. Other teams of designers submit their own ideas for how it should look, too, but these are eventually passed over in favor of the final design. This is the case for some of the world’s most recognizable landmarks—in an alternate world, the Arc de Triomphe might have been a three-story-tall elephant statue, and the Lincoln Memorial a step pyramid.

GoCompare, a comparison site for financial services, dug into these could-have-been designs for Alternate Architecture, an illustrated collection of scrapped designs for some of the most famous structures in the world, from Chicago's Tribune Tower to the Sydney Opera House.

Click through the interactive graphic below to explore rejected designs for all five landmarks.

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