For Sale: A Frank Lloyd Wright Home With a Waterfall

Houlihan Lawrence
Houlihan Lawrence

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater isn’t the only home designed by the architect to include a waterfall. In the years preceding Wright’s death in 1959, he designed Tirranna, a U-shaped residence in New Canaan, Connecticut. (The name “Tirranna” is an aboriginal Australian word meaning “running waters.”) The house sits next to a pond fed by the nearby Noroton River and overlooks a tiny cascade. Experts say it’s one of around 400 of Wright’s remaining works in America—and now, it can belong to a fan willing to shell out just over $7 million for a piece of architectural history.

Tirranna’s most recent owners were Ted Stanley, a philanthropist and entrepreneur, and his wife Vada, according to The Wall Street Journal. The two purchased the home around 20 years ago, but Vada Stanley passed away in 2013, and Ted Stanley last year. In January, the home was listed for $8 million. It’s still on the market, so its sellers have lowered the asking price to $7.2 million.

Tirranna has seven bedrooms and sits on 15 acres of forest. In addition to the pond and waterfall, the grounds include gardens designed by Frank Okamura, the landscape architect for the Brooklyn Botanic Garden; a tennis court; a barn and a stable; a swimming pool; a greenhouse; a guest house; and a workshop.

The home itself has been renovated, but it still bears all the stylistic marks of a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed abode: gold leaf-covered chimneys, skylights, built-in bookshelves, and floor-to-ceiling glass window that provide sweeping views of the surrounding forest. Originally, it contained Wright-designed furnishings, but many items of furniture were sold by prior owners, so the Stanleys commissioned reproductions after they purchased the property.

View some pictures of Tirranna below, or visit the online listing for more images (or to make an offer!).

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright's “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut

All photos courtesy of Houlihan Lawrence.

8 Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings Join the List of UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Mariano Mantel Follow, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Mariano Mantel Follow, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

The UNESCO World Heritage Center recognizes sites of great cultural, historical, or scientific importance, from manmade cities like Venice to natural wonders like the Great Barrier Reef. A group of new locations honored this month aren't nearly as old as some other sites on the list, but in just the past century or so, they've made a huge impact. During its 43rd annual session, the World Heritage Committee elected to add eight buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the American architect who pioneered the Prairie School movement in the 20th century.

The Frank Lloyd Wright structures joining the UNESCO list include Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona; Hollyhock House in Los Angeles; the Frederick C. Robie House in Chicago; Unity Temple in Oak Park, Illinois; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City; Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania; the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House in Madison, Wisconsin; and Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin. Each building was constructed between 1905 and 1938, and they represent just a handful of the more than 400 Wright works still standing today.

The group makes up a single World Heritage Site known as "The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright." Together, the buildings are the 24th World Heritage Site recognized in the U.S., accompanying such places as Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Everglades National Park in Florida, and the Grand Canyon in Arizona. They're not the first example of modern architecture to be added to the list, though. The Sydney Opera House, the city of Brasilia, and the Bauhaus School in Germany are also World Heritage Sites.

According to organization's website, adding landmarks to the UNESCO World Heritage list "helps raise awareness among citizens and governments for heritage preservation," and that "greater awareness leads to a general rise in the level of the protection and conservation given to heritage properties." Countries that house heritage sites are also eligible for funding from UNESCO to preserve them. All of the sites included "The 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright" are already protected as National Historic Landmarks, and many are open to visitors.

The World’s Largest Underwater Restaurant Just Opened in Norway—Take a Peek Inside

Ivar Kvaal
Ivar Kvaal

Months before it opened, the world's largest underwater restaurant in Norway was already flooded with reservations. Recently, Business Insider reported that Under has finally started serving its first guests. If you can't book a table at the hottest restaurant below sea level, you can look at the photos taken inside to get an idea of the unique dining experience.

In addition to being the largest underwater restaurant on Earth, Under, from the architecture firm Snøhetta, is also the first of its kind in Europe. It's located in the notoriously treacherous waters off Norway's southern coast.

Underwater restaurant jutting out of the sea.
Ivar Kvaal

After entering the angled building from the shore, guests descend into a 100-person dining room with panoramic views of the ocean and passing marine life. The concrete structure is designed to blend seamlessly into the surrounding environment, eventually acting as an artificial reef that attracts plants and animals. The location boasts such biodiversity that Under is also being used as a research center for marine biologists.

Dining room of underwater restaurant.
Ivar Kvaal

Jellyfish in the ocean.
Ivar Kvaal

Once seated, diners will be treated to a seasonal meal from an international team of chefs led by Nicolai Ellitsgaard. The menu highlights locally sourced produce and sustainably caught wildlife. A full meal lasts roughly three-and-a-half to four hours.

Shellfish dish at Under restaurant.
Stian Broch

Spiny crab.
Stian Broch

Dining room of Under, the underwater restaurant.
Ivar Kvaal

Dining room of Under
Inger Marie Grini/Bo Bedre Norge

Seats at Under are fully booked from now to the end of September. If you're content with getting your name on a waiting list, you can try to reserve a table for earlier in the year through the restaurant's website.

[h/t Business Insider]

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