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Recent Hailstorm Is Colorado’s Most Expensive Catastrophe Ever

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No storm that brings baseball-sized hail is going to be easy to deal with, but Denver’s recent thunderstorm proved to be a costly one. The May 8 hailstorm is the most costly insured catastrophe in the state, The Washington Post reports.

According to the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association, insurance claims in the state related to the hailstorm—for damages to cars and homes, for instance—cost as much as $1.4 billion. More than 50,000 homeowners filed claims, as did 150 car owners. That makes it the most expensive catastrophe in recent history for Colorado insurers.

Its costs easily surpassed those of previous storms. Adjusting for inflation, one of the most expensive storms for insurers on record before this, which took place in July 1990, cost $1.1 billion, and the second-most expensive storm, back in July 2009, cost a mere $845.5 million in today’s dollars.

Damage caused by the torrent of ice, which included baseball-sized hail, was worse than usual because it fell during rush hour, which means there were plenty of cars on the road when the windshield-crushing precipitation came down. At another time of day, some of those cars might have been inside garages and out of harm's way.

Recent research has found that extreme weather is becoming a more frequent occurrence across the world, and according to scientists, climate change will continue to increase the likelihood of extreme events like massive heat waves and intense storms. That's bad news for insurance companies: More frequent and more powerful storms mean that insurers are going to have to pay out a whole lot more money for damages than they used to.

[h/t The Washington Post]

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Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
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Weather Watch
It's So Cold In One Part of Russia That People's Eyelashes Are Freezing
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Oymyakon, a rural village in the eastern Russian region of Yakutia, is one of the coldest inhabited spots in the world. While some schools in the U.S. cancel classes as temperatures approach zero, schools in Oymyakon remain open in -40°F weather. But recently temperatures in the region have dropped too low even for seasoned locals to handle. As AP reports, the chill, which hit -88.6°F on January 16, is cold enough to break thermometers and freeze eyelashes.

Photos shared by residents on social media show the mercury in thermometers hovering at -70°F, the lowest temperature some are built to measure. When thermometers fail, people in Oymyakon have other ways of gauging the cold. Their uncovered eyelashes can freeze upon stepping outside. Hot water tossed in the air will also turn to snow before hitting the ground.

To Oymyakon's 500-odd citizens, the most recent cold snap is nothing out of the ordinary. Temperatures are perpetually below freezing there from late October to mid-May, and average temperatures for the winter months frequently reach −58 °F. On Tuesday, residents were advised to stay inside and stay as warm as possible. Of course, that directive wasn't enough to stop some adventurous locals from sneaking outside for selfies.

[h/t AP]

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Amazon
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Weather Watch
Heated Mats Keep Steps Ice-Free in the Winter
Amazon
Amazon

The first snow of the season is always exciting, but the magic can quickly run out when you remember all the hazards that come with icy conditions. Along with heating bills, frosted cars, and other pains, the ground develops a coat of ice that can be dangerous for pedestrians and drivers alike. Outdoor steps become particularly treacherous and many people find themselves clutching their railings for fear of making it to the bottom headfirst. Instead of putting salt down the next time it snows, consider a less messy approach: heated mats that quickly melt the ice away.

The handy devices are made with a thermoplastic material and can melt two inches of snow per hour. They're designed to be left outside, so you can keep them ready to go for the whole winter. The 10-by-30-inch mats fit on most standard steps and come with grips to help prevent slipping. A waterproof connector cable connects to additional mats so up to 15 steps can be covered.

Unfortunately, this convenience comes at a price: You need to buy a 120-volt power unit for them to work, and each mat is sold separately. Running at $60 a mat, the price can add up pretty quickly. Still, if you live in a colder place where it's pretty much always snowing, it might be worth it.

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