CLOSE
Original image
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Museum Exhibit Features Original Hand-Drawn Sketches of Mac Icons

Original image
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Before the graphic of a frowning computer with pixelated Xs for eyes appeared on the screen of an unfortunate Mac owner for the first time, the image started as a drawing in a notebook. Susan Kare is the designer responsible for creating the icons for Apple’s graphical user interface (GUI) in 1983. Some of her original sketches are now on display at the Design Museum in London as part of an exhibit titled "California: Designing Freedom," It’s Nice That reports.

Prior to the release of the original Macintosh, users had to type in code to get their computers to complete the simplest tasks. Accessibility was the main goal for the GUI. Kare’s designs were limited to black and white pixels, so she planned them out on graph paper using a marker or pen. The result was a universal code that helped make computers a fixture in the home.

Kare’s original pictographs include the pair of scissors used for the "cut" command, the pointing finger for "paste," the paintbrush for MacPaint, the floppy disk for "save," and the trash bin used to delete files. She’s since worked as a designer for Microsoft and Facebook, but the visuals she produced for Apple remain her most influential work. Visitors to the Design Museum can see select pages from her sketchbook from now through October 15.

[h/t It’s Nice That]

Original image
iStock
arrow
technology
Google Maps Is Getting a Makeover With More Icons and Colors
Original image
iStock

Prepare to get used to some big changes to your Google Maps app. The tech giant announced in a blog post that it’s changing the tool’s design to better highlight information that’s relevant to your journey.

The first update can be seen when switching between modes of transportation. If you’re driving from your home to work, for example, Maps will show you gas stations along your route, but switch to public transit and train stations will pop up instead.

The app’s color scheme has also been given a makeover. All points of interest (POI) that appear on the map are now color-coded. Looking for the nearest restaurant? Food and drink POI are orange. Need some retail therapy? Shopping icons are blue. Hospitals (pink), churches (gray), outdoor spaces (green), and more are included in the new system.

Within the larger categories, Google has introduced dozens of specialized icons to indicate subcategories. Banks are marked with a dollar sign, cafes with a coffee cup, etc.

“The world is an ever-evolving place,” Google Maps product manager Liz Hunt wrote in the blog post. “Now, we’re updating Google Maps with a new look that better reflects your world, right now.”

This overhaul is the latest way Google Maps is evolving to make life more convenient for its users. In the past year, the app has rolled out features that allow you to locate your parked car and to check how crowded attractions are at certain times. The new design changes will start appearing over the next few weeks.

Phones with maps app open.
Google

Color key for Google Maps.
Google

Icons for Google Maps.
Google
Original image
iStock
arrow
technology
Facebook Just Made It Easier to Tell the Difference Between Fake News and Real Reporting
Original image
iStock

On Facebook, fake news stories "reporting" international conflicts over Toblerones can appear alongside fact-checked journalism from trustworthy outlets. This leads to some bogus stories racking up thousands of shares while real news stories are deemed "fake" by those who disagree with them. With its latest news feature, Facebook aims to make the distinction between factual and fictional posts clearer.

As The Verge reports, articles shared on Facebook will now display a "trust indicator" icon. Clicking on it reveals information about the publisher of the piece, including their ethics statement, corrections policy, fact-checking process, ownership structures, and masthead. By providing that context, Facebook hopes that more users will make better decisions about which news outlets to trust and which to disregard.

The social media network is launching the feature with a handful of publishers and plans to open it up to more down the road. But unless it becomes mandatory for all media pages, it won't be the end of Facebook's fake news problem: Phony sites and real publishers that leave this information blank will still look the same in the eyes of some readers. Additionally, the feature only works when people go out of their way to check it, so it requires users to be skeptical in the first place.

If you want to avoid the fake news in your feed, looking for trust indicators is a good place to start. To further sharpen your BS-detecting skills, try adopting the CRAAP system: The American Library Association has been using it to spot sketchy sources since before the Facebook era.

[h/t The Verge]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios