Monster Wave Rocks the Southern Ocean

iStock
iStock

A wave as tall as a five-story building swelled, reared its head, and slammed back into the Southern Ocean on May 20, The Weather Channel reports. Scientists say it was one of the largest ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere.

The Southern Ocean, also known as the Antarctic Ocean, surrounds the lowermost continent, mingling upward into the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It’s a realm of strong, persistent westerly winds and “unlimited fetch” (a term defined as “an area of ocean surface over which the wind blows in a constant direction,” and not “cool.” Sorry, Gretchen). These extreme conditions combine to regularly roll up waves, but none like the 63-foot giant that crashed through over the weekend.

The wave activity was picked up by a buoy newly installed in the waters near Campbell Island, New Zealand.

"The buoy is performing extremely well so far," according to a statement by oceanographer Tom Durrant of MetOcean Solutions, the company that monitors the buoy. "Not only is it surviving these large waves, but it is making detailed recordings of extreme sea states in the Southern Ocean, a region rarely observed by in-situ instruments.”

Durant says understanding how the ocean rocks and rolls in extreme conditions can help scientists understand waves and the relationship between air and water.

He added, “This, in turn, will lead to improvements in the models used to simulate the waves, providing better forecasts, both for the Southern Ocean and for the wider region.”

[h/t The Weather Channel]

A Simple Trick for Defrosting Your Windshield in Less Than 60 Seconds

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iStock

As beautiful as a winter snowfall can be, the white stuff is certainly not without its irritations—especially if you have to get into your car and go somewhere. As if shoveling a path to the driver’s door wasn’t enough, then you’ve got a frozen windshield with which to contend. Everyone has his or her own tricks for warming up a car in record time—including appropriately-named meteorologist Ken Weathers, who works at WATE in Knoxville, Tennessee.

A while back, Weathers shared a homemade trick for defrosting your windshield in less than 60 seconds: spray the glass with a simple solution of one part water and two parts rubbing alcohol. “The reason why this works,” according to Weathers, “is [that] rubbing alcohol has a freezing point of 128 degrees below freezing.”

Watch the spray in action below.

[h/t: Travel + Leisure]

Website Lets You Report Individuals Affected by Hurricane Michael to Search-and-Rescue Teams

Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images
Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images

When Hurricane Michael made landfall in Florida as a Category 4 hurricane on October 10, it became the strongest storm to hit the continental U.S. since 1992. Homes from Florida to Virginia have since been leveled and at least 11 people have died. With internet and phone lines down across the disaster zone, many people are desperate to know if their loved ones are safe—now there's an online tool that can help them.

If you're having trouble getting in touch with someone who was in the hurricane's path, you can report them through a new website set up by the Florida National Guard, First Coast News reports. The site asks for the person's name, gender, age, and address, as well as any life-threatening issues they may be facing, such as low oxygen or medication supplies. After you submit their information, the State Emergency Operations Center forwards it to the relevant local agency doing recovery work.

Michael moved back over the Atlantic as a post-tropical storm Friday morning following its rampage through the southeastern U.S. More than 1000 search-and-rescue workers have already been deployed in Florida alone, and the death toll is expected to rise as clean-up efforts continue across the region.

[h/t First Coast News]

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