Look Inside the Sketchbook of a World War II Soldier

Even with news of the Second World War congesting airwaves in 1942, 19-year-old Victor Lundy was optimistic about his future. He was studying at New York University to become an architect and he planned to use his skills to help rebuild Europe after the war, according to Mashable. Lundy enlisted in the Army Specialized Training Program with this goal in mind, but leading up to D-Day in 1944, the Army decided he would be more useful in the infantry.

He survived his years in combat without losing his artist’s eye. While serving in the military, he filled several 3-inch-by-5-inch sketchbooks with images from his daily life. A quick pencil drawing from his training days in Fort Jackson, South Carolina shows soldiers resting after a forced march. "...they're at rest, because you know, when you're on a forced march there's no way I can draw," Lundy once recalled, according to the Library of Congress. "So the other guys would be snoozing, sleeping, and I'd be sketching."

Sketch of World War II soldiers.

Other sketches depict his fellow infantrymen traveling to France, playing games at the camp, and lying wounded on the battlefield. "For me, drawing is sort of synonymous with thinking," Lundy said.

When the war ended, he returned to the U.S. to complete his degree at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He then went on to open his own architecture firm in Florida, become a fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and design such famous structures as the U.S. Tax Court in Washington D.C.

In 2009, Lundy donated eight sketchbooks from his time in the Army to the Library of Congress. You can view some highlights from the collection below.

Sketch of World War II soldiers.

Sketch of WWII bunker.

Sketch of soldiers looking at distant ship.

Sketch drawn by World War II soldier

Sketch of World War II soldiers.

Sketch of World War II planes.

[h/t Mashable]

All images: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, World War Two sketches by Victor Lundy

Florida Man Discovers Original D-Day Audiotapes in His Basement

American troops landing on Omaha beach at Normandy on D-Day.
American troops landing on Omaha beach at Normandy on D-Day.
Keystone/Getty Images

Bruce Campbell never expected to find some of World War II’s most important radio broadcasts buried in his cluttered basement.

The story starts in 1994, when Campbell and his wife purchased a cabin in Mattituck, New York, a small town about 40 miles from Long Island. The cabin, formerly owned by the vice president of a company that manufactured audio recording equipment, was full of dusty boxes and old tapes that Campbell began clearing out soon after he moved in.

“I ran across this stuff that says, 1944, VJ day, all these different things from the war,” Campbell told The Washington Post. “I put them all in a plastic bag, [thinking] ‘These gotta be something, I’ll look at them another day.’”

Then he promptly forgot all about them.

Years later, Campbell—who now lives in Loxahatchee, Florida—sought the help of a British electrical engineer to figure out what was on the tapes. Campbell was shocked to find out that he was in possession of original D-Day dispatches from radio correspondent George Hicks.

“I’m listening to this, and I feel like I’m standing on the battleship with this guy,” Campbell said. “It made my hair stand up.”

Hicks’s broadcast is often considered one of the “best audio recordings to come out of World War II.” Hicks’s recording is significant because he was one of the few journalists who covered the D-Day invasions in real time [ PDF ].

Earlier this year, Campbell donated the tapes to the National D-Day Memorial in Bedford, Virginia. “‘That’s the place’ where the artifacts should be,” Campbell told The Washington Post.

[h/t The Washington Post ]

Civil War Cannonballs Found on South Carolina Beach in Aftermath of Hurricane Dorian

ABDESIGN/iStock via Getty Images
ABDESIGN/iStock via Getty Images

Hurricane Dorian skimmed the United States' East Coast last week, creating a trail of damage residents are still dealing with. But it wasn't just trash and debris the storm surges left behind: As WCSC reports, two cannonballs dating back to the Civil War were discovered on Folly Beach in South Carolina in the aftermath of the storm.

Aaron Lattin and his girlfriend Alba were walking on the beach on September 6 when they saw what looked like rocks nestled in the sand. As they examined them more closely, they realized they had found something much more special. The weathered objects were actually cannonballs that have likely been buried in the area for more than 150 years.

Incredibly, this isn't the first time Civil War cannonballs have been discovered on Folly Beach following a hurricane: In 2016, Hurricane Matthew unearthed 16 of them. Folly Island was used as a Union base a century and a half ago, and items leftover from the artillery battery built there are still scattered around the shoreline. The couple behind this latest discovery believes there are more waiting to be found.

Old cannonballs may look like cool artifacts to treasure hunters, but they should still be treated with caution. Police and bombs disposal technicians were called to the scene at Folly Beach to confirm the cannonballs were no longer functional.

[h/t WCSC]

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