Hidden Bar in New York City's Grand Central Reopens

Mario Tama / Staff/ Getty
Mario Tama / Staff/ Getty
Hidden in a dark corner of New York City’s Grand Central Station sits a luxury cocktail bar and lounge doubling as one of the city’s historic landmarks. For a year it was shuttered, but now the Campbell Apartment is open to serve the public again, Travel+Leisure reports. The location was once the office of early 20th century railroad executive John W. Campbell during the 1920s. After serving as the location for CBS Radio and as a small jail for Metro-North Railroad, the space was converted into a bar in 1999. Then, in 2016, the Campbell Apartment—with its high ceilings and faux stone fireplace—closed when previous owner Mark Grossich lost his lease after 17 years of business. Today, the Gerber Group runs the public bar that features signature cocktails; fancy finger foods, such as tuna tartare tacos and meatball sliders; and a casual dress code. The bar also has a view of Grand Central’s main terminal, as well as a terrace that faces a busy 43rd Street. The New York Historical Society had to approve any interior changes because of the bar’s status in the city. “We wanted to make sure that we refreshed it but it’s such an iconic place and people have memories of it,” Scott Gerber, CEO of Gerber Group, explained to Travel+Leisure. “We wanted to make sure we were respectful of whatever we did." The Campbell Apartment is now open at Grand Central Terminal at the corner of 42nd Street and Vanderbilt Avenue. [h/t Travel+Leisure]

New Memory Foam Neck Pillow Takes the Pain Out of Travel

iStock.com/izusek
iStock.com/izusek

Travel can be a pain in the neck—quite literally. Kinks and cramps don’t have to be part of the package, though. Edge Signature, whose lineup of practical travel products includes a digital luggage scale and an anti-theft backpack, has designed a memory foam pillow that adapts to the contours of your head and neck.

The True Adaptive pillow has been given an ergonomic M-shape, with the two bumps in the back providing some extra support for your neck. The problem with many travel pillows is that they don’t hold your neck steady when you start to doze off. “The deeper we fall into unconsciousness or our sleep state, the more relaxed our muscles will be,” Edge Signature writes in its Kickstarter campaign for the True Adaptive pillow. “This makes it practically impossible for us to get a good rest or sleep while sitting upright as our neck muscle will have to keep working to support our neck.”

That’s where the pillow’s high-density memory foam comes in. It will stay in place even as you move around, and an adjustable string in the front makes it fit as loose or as snug as you’d like. There’s even a smartphone pocket on the side, so you won’t have to worry about finding your phone in a dimly lit aircraft cabin.

When you’re done using the pillow, fold it up and place it back into its carrying pouch, which can be clipped onto your suitcase or backpack. After returning from a long trip, you can remove the cover and throw it in the washing machine to get it ready for your next big adventure. The zipper is hidden, though, with the advantage being that you won’t have any plastic bits poking you in the face while you’re trying to nap.

The pillow’s usefulness isn’t limited to travel, either. Wear it at your office desk, or while studying or reading for extended periods of time. Backers who pledge $39 or more before January 9, 2019 will get the True Adaptive pillow and carrying pouch at a 35 percent discount. U.S. shipping is free.

Ralphie's House From A Christmas Story Is Available to Rent

Jimmy Emerson, DVM, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Jimmy Emerson, DVM, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

From Chinese restaurant Christmas dinners to receiving embarrassing gifts from an aunt, many viewers can relate to Ralphie Parker's holiday experience in 1983's A Christmas Story. Now fans of the beloved film—which is celebrating its 35th anniversary—can live it firsthand: As WLWT5 reports, the Parker house from A Christmas Story is available to rent on a nightly basis.

Located in the Tremont neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio, the iconic childhood home of the movie's narrator is open to the public year-round. During the day, guests can take a guided tour of the house where Ralphie almost shot his eye out. The interior is decorated to match the movie's 1940s setting, complete with a leg lamp in the living room window.

At night, the building's private third floor is available for guests to rent out. The loft, which includes a bedroom, living room, kitchen, and bathroom, can accommodate six people at a time. Rates start at $395 per night, though the price varies depending on the time of year.

Whether you're spending the night at Ralphie's or just visiting for a tour, your trip also includes admission to the Christmas Story Museum across the street. There you'll find original memorabilia from the film, including Randy's snowsuit, the chalkboard from Miss Shields's classroom, and the Parker family's car.

To book your stay, head over to the house and museum's website.

Interior of home from A Christmas Story.
A Christmas Story House & Museum

[h/t WLWT5]

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