Iceland’s New Lava Center Will Overlook Three Active Volcanoes

The volcanoes of Iceland are famous for shaping the island’s landscape, fueling its hot springs, and causing mass flight delays. Now, the nation is getting its own museum dedicated to its volatile underbelly. As The Guardian reports, the new volcano and earthquake center will provide views of three active volcanoes when it opens June 1.

The Lava Center is situated in the town of Hvolsvöllur in south Iceland. Surrounding it are some of the most active volcanoes in the country. Katla, Hekla, and Eyjafjallajökull have each erupted several times over the past century. Most recently, Eyjafjallajökull made headlines in 2010 when it coughed up enough ash and debris to halt flights across Europe.

Visitors can see all three of the explosive behemoths from the center’s 360-degree viewing platform. Other attractions at the museum include a timeline of volcanic eruptions, an artificial “ash corridor,” and a 30-foot-tall recreation of a lava stream beneath the Earth’s surface. The space also features a movie theater where guests can watch real-life footage of volcanoes and earthquakes.

When it launches next month, the Lava Center will be just one way to experience Iceland’s geological wonders. The destination is also home to lava fields, visible tectonic plates, and dormant volcanoes that are accessible to the public.

Lava Center in Iceland.

Lava Center in Iceland.

Lava Center in Iceland.

[h/t The Guardian]

All images courtesy of Lava Center.

10 Travel Hacks That Will Save You Time and Money

iStock.com/a_namenko
iStock.com/a_namenko

Traveling can be one of life's greatest experiences, but if things go wrong, you might wish you had stayed at home. In an effort to help you spend less and stress less on your next vacation, the London Luton Airport has created an infographic containing helpful travel advice.

Some of the tips are gentle reminders—like book your flights early, avoid peak traveling seasons, and please be nice to the airline staff—while others are less obvious. For instance, it's best to avoid flying over a seven-night block of time. If you book flights over a period of six or eight nights instead, "you've got a better chance of scoring a lower fare," the airport claims. (Also worth noting: If you're flying domestic in the U.S., the cheapest days to travel are usually Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays, according to Fare Compare. For international flights, weekdays are typically cheaper, although it depends on the exact route.)

In general, anything you can take care of in advance is a good idea. Check to see if you can get a better parking rate by pre-paying online, and take the time to apply for a TSA PreCheck. It's easy to do, and when it's all said and done, you'll be able to join the express line at airport security. If only Starbucks had a fast lane, too.

Keep scrolling to read more advice from the London Luton Airport, and for more travel tips, check out Mental Floss's guides to booking flights, packing a suitcase, and crafting the perfect itinerary.

10 TRAVEL HACKS TO SAVE YOU TIME AND MONEY

Climate Change Is Threatening Nearly All UNESCO Sites Around the Mediterranean

iStock.com/tunart
iStock.com/tunart

The Mediterranean is home to some of the world's most famous cultural wonders, with 49 UNESCO-recognized world heritage sites in the region in total. Now, the organization warns that all but two of these sites are threatened by flooding and erosion linked to climate change, Artnet News reports.

For a recent study, published in the journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers looked at how various possible outcomes of rising sea levels could impact the Mediterranean coast between now and 2100. They found that even if global temperatures rise just 2°C (about 3.6°F) above pre-industrial numbers, the area's most treasured sites will still be at risk.

The places most vulnerable to rising sea levels include the Patriarchal Basilica of Aquileia, the Renaissance city of Ferrara, and the city of Venice. When it comes to erosion, Tyre in Lebanon, the archaeological sites of Tárraco in Spain, and the Ephesus in Turkey face the most pressing danger.

A handful of world heritage sites along the Mediterranean Sea, like the Early Christian Monuments of Ravenna and the Cathedral of St. James, could potentially be relocated as an extreme final option. Only two sites on the list—Medina of Tunis and Xanthos-Letoon—would be safe from the flooding and erosion spurred by climate change.

Rising global temperatures are on track to reshape coasts, not just in the Mediterranean, but around the world. In addition to historic sites, homes and airports are also under threat.

[h/t Artnet News]

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