Patagonia Created a Bikini That Won't Slip Off

iStock
iStock

As all bikini-wearers know, the two-piece bathing suit is a risky choice for active sports. The pesky fabric has a tendency to fall out of place, or—if you're doing something like tubing or water skiing—fall off completely. Before you opt for a one piece, know that Patagonia has found a possible solution for your bikini woes. They've created a special bathing suit that won't slip off, no matter how many waves hit you.

The product is the result of Patagonia talking with female surfers, who say they prefer bikinis because it makes them feel freer in the water.

“I don’t see a lot of people trying to create women’s products that are specifically built for sport and that’s discouraging. In surfing, all the swimwear innovation is happening on the men’s side of the business,” Laura Kinman, Patagonia’s product line director of women’s sportswear and surfing, tells Outside.

Bathing suits
Back Country

In 2014, Kinman discovered a sticky fabric that gripped to skin when wet. The material has a large surface area, made up of thousands of microscopic polyester filaments that are 1/175000th the thickness of a human hair. She used them to build a few prototype bikinis and brought them to Oahu's North Shore to let the Patagonia surfing ambassadors test them out.

Although the material, called Nanogrip, feels unusual and takes a long time to dry, it was a big hit with the surfers who tried it out. Thanks to the way the material hugs the body, athletes wearing it no longer have to hold on to their suit when diving or emerging from the water.

You can find the Nanogrip top here and the bottoms here.

America's Divorce Rate is Declining—and We Have Millennials to Thank for It

iStock/Jason_Lee_Hughes
iStock/Jason_Lee_Hughes

Millennials are reportedly killing off yet another cultural mainstay, but this time, it may be a good thing. According to Bloomberg, divorce rates are going down, thanks to the commitment powers of younger generations.

Between 2008 and 2016, the divorce rate in the U.S. dropped by 18 percent, according to a new analysis of data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Controlling for related factors like age (older people are less likely to get divorced than younger couples), the rate still dropped by 8 percent. By contrast, Baby Boomers have consistently divorced at higher rates than previous generations.

Many declines that Millennials are blamed for—like rates of homeownership or having kids—can actually be attributed to the dismal finances of a generation that came of age in a recession, is saddled with crushing student debt, and faces high costs of living and low wage growth. Divorces can be expensive, too. Yet several trends point to a higher likelihood of marriage stability for the Millennial generation that has nothing to do with finances. On average, Millennials are marrying later in life, and spending more time dating partners prior to marriage than earlier generations, both of which correlate with a lower chance of divorce, according to social scientists.

“The U.S. is progressing toward a system in which marriage is rarer, and more stable, than it was in the past,” author Philip Cohen writes in the paper.

Sorry, law school students, but it looks like being a divorce lawyer is going to get a little less lucrative in the future.

[h/t Bloomberg]

Tune in Tonight: Mental Floss on Jeopardy!

All that time you've spent on here is about to pay off.

Tune in tonight for Jeopardy! and you'll catch the debut of the "I Learned It From Mental Floss" category. Big bucket list moment for us.

We've been working closely with the Jeopardy! team over on Instagram, sharing amazing facts on both @jeopardy and @mental_floss. Study up!

Check your local listings for stations and show times.

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