11 High-Flying Facts About Plane Crazy

Henry Guttmann/Getty Images
Henry Guttmann/Getty Images

Mickey Mouse may seem pretty spry, but he made his first public appearance to test audiences 89 years ago this week. No, the cartoon wasn't the much-beloved Steamboat Willie—it was Plane Crazy, a six-minute silent short that was made in a matter of weeks. Here's what you need to know about Mickey's high-flying debut.

1. IT WAS A REVENGE CARTOON.

In 1927, Walt Disney and his partner, Ub Iwerks, had recently lost the rights to Oswald the Lucky Rabbit—a popular character they had created—to Charles Mintz, a producer and distributor for whom they had been making cartoons. To add insult to injury, Mintz also hired most of the animators out from under Disney and Iwerks. Determined to come up with something just as good, the duo worked on the short that would become Plane Crazy while simultaneously finishing their last three Oswald shorts for Mintz.

2. THE PROJECT WAS KEPT SECRET FROM THE REST OF THE ANIMATORS.

To keep the project top secret, Iwerks drew in an isolated room away from the other animators working on the last Oswald cartoons. He prided himself on his breakneck pace, often completing as many as 700 drawings a day. Other animators who had stayed loyal to Disney worked behind high black curtains to prevent the “traitor” employees from seeing.

3. THE CELS WERE HAND-INKED IN DISNEY’S GARAGE.

When it came time to ink Iwerks’s drawings onto cels, Walt, his wife Lilly, and two of his sisters-in-law huddled together in Disney’s garage and did them by hand. They went back to the studio and photographed the cels late at night when no one else was there.

4. THE SHORT PARODIED THE CHARLES LINDBERGH CRAZE.

Black and white photo of pilot Charles Lindbergh in the cockpit of a postal plane.
General Photographic Agency/Getty Images

Disney decided on a plane-themed cartoon for Mickey’s debut to take advantage of the public’s love of aviator Charles Lindbergh. Lindbergh had made his famous transatlantic flight just the year before.

5. IT HAD A VERY LIMITED NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCREENINGS.

Not many people got to witness Mickey’s first appearance, and the lucky few who did had no idea that they were witnessing history. On May 17, 1928, a Los Angeles theater showed Plane Crazy to test audiences for one day only. Walt sat in the back of the theater and monitored the audience’s response. It was nearly unanimous: Everyone loved the little mouse.

6. PLANE CRAZY’S FAILURE INSPIRED WALT TO GET IN ON THE TALKING PICTURE CRAZE.

Though Mickey and pals tested really well with audiences, the silent short failed to pick up a distributor. The Jazz Singer had come out the year before, and in a flash of inspiration, Walt decided that synchronized sound was the future of cartoons.

7. IT WAS THE FIRST MICKEY MOUSE CARTOON TO BE MADE, BUT THE THIRD TO BE RELEASED.

Rather than apply sound to Plane Crazy retroactively, Disney decided to try the synchronized sound technique on the short the team was currently working on—Steamboat Willie. Mickey’s stint as a riverboat pilot was released, to much fanfare, on November 18, 1928. It was only after that success that Disney and Iwerks went back and added sound to Plane Crazy and The Gallopin’ Gaucho, another silent short they had worked on prior to Steamboat Willie. As a result, Plane Crazy was actually the third Mickey short to be released even though it was the first to be completed.

8. THE SHORT WAS ALSO MINNIE’S DEBUT.

Of course, much is made of the fact that Plane Crazy is technically Mickey’s first appearance, but it’s also Minnie’s debut, which makes them sweethearts from the get-go. (Though if you actually watch the short, she’s not exactly thrilled about the prospect just yet.) It also marks the first appearance of Clarabelle Cow.

9. PRODUCTION WAS A BARGAIN.

According to Disney records, the entire short—minus the sound—was made for a mere $1772. That’s roughly $25,339 in 2017 dollars.

10. WALT’S KIDS WEREN’T IMPRESSED.

Though Plane Crazy was groundbreaking at the time, by the time Disney’s children saw the first Mickey Mouse cartoon later in life, they were unimpressed. The kids were reportedly “astonished” by how crudely drawn he was, with sticks for arms and legs and a circular torso.

11. YOU CAN STILL SEE PLANE CRAZY AT DISNEYLAND.

You can still get a taste of what it might have been like to see Plane Crazy in a theater back in 1928. The Main Street Cinema at Disneyland still runs six old Mickey Mouse cartoons today: Plane Crazy, Steamboat Willie, The Moose Hunt, Traffic Troubles, The Dognapper, and Mickey’s Polo Team.

Or, you can watch it right here:

Netflix Promises That The Office Isn't Going Anywhere, Despite Reports to the Contrary

NBCUniversal, Inc.
NBCUniversal, Inc.

With all of the streaming sites available, deciding which one to choose can sometimes be just as difficult as figuring out what to watch once you get there. But one thing is certain: For Netflix users, The Office never fails. Which explains why Dunder Mifflin devotees panicked when they heard that the NBC series would be leaving the streaming giant's library. Fortunately, Netflix quickly took to Twitter to reassure fans that the Steve Carell-starring comedy isn’t going anywhere ... until at least 2021.

Earlier this week, The Wall Street Journal reported that NBCUniversal might want to take back its rights to The Office in order to put the series on their own streaming site, which is not yet live. This, of course, sent fans into a frenzy. Many took to social media to share how upset they were that their favorite workplace comedy might be disappearing. (A similar situation happened with Friends, another one of Netflix's most popular shows, back in December.)

Although The Office aficionados can breathe a sigh of relief—at least for now—Marvel fans haven't been so lucky. Disney has started to remove its movies along with Netflix’s Marvel shows like The Punisher and Daredevil. The new streaming service Disney+ will drop in November and will feature Marvel films, as well as original series—plus the entire Star Wars franchise.

With all the changes, it’s not difficult to become paranoid that your favorite show might be taken off your preferred streaming service. Better to binge what you can now while it’s still available.

Game of Thrones Could Have a Major Twist In Store for Tyrion Lannister

Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

We're only two episodes into the final season of Game of Thrones, and already we've seen Jon Snow learn about his true lineage—and then reveal that game-changing tidbit to Daenerys Targaryen (who seemed oddly unbothered by the news). But what if we’re about to learn something about the true identity of yet another major character?

Over the years, many fans have theorized that Tyrion Lannister is also a secret Targaryen—and while some dismissed the idea once it was confirmed that Jon Snow is actually Aegon Targaryen, a couple of key moments in season 8 might be hinting that Tryion could indeed still have Targaryen blood.

Reddit user nisensegar believes Tyrion has discovered he’s a Targaryen, which would explain why he has been acting a little strangely this season. The evidence to back up this theory comes from three specific moments: When Tyrion was able set Daenerys’s dragons free without getting burned; when he watched the door to the room in which Dany and Jon were making love, as if he knew what was going on; and his father, Tywin Lannister’s, last words before Tyrion killed him being: “You’re no son of mine.” These pieces of possible evidence have been cited before in fan theories, but this Reddit user believes Tyrion’s recent behavior supports the claim as well.

All of these things have seemingly been leading up to the most recent episode when Bran Stark speaks to Tyrion, which might have been him confirming his true identity. This would make sense, considering we didn’t actually witness their conversation—we just know they had one.

“A lot was mentioned about Tyrion's intelligence and his challenged loyalty," the Redditor writes "There is also an ominous, secretive shot of him in next week's teaser giving a side glance, half-concealed. Very foreboding.”

The Redditor also references the final scene in "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms," the most recent episode, which shows Jon and Daenerys, and then Tyrion. “It's a very strange and wild family dynamic but as Sansa famously said: ‘Families are complicated,'" the post concludes.

Given how popular the theory has become over the years, we're dubious of its veracity. (Showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss hate to be predictable.) However, we can’t deny these clues. We’ll hopefully find out what Bran and Tyrion discussed, as well as why the latter has been acting so differently, in the coming episodes.

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