The Time George Lucas Warned Congress About the Dangers of Altering Classic Movies

Getty Images
Getty Images

Long before the “Special Editions” of the Star Wars trilogy littered George Lucas’s blockbuster franchise with computer-generated lounge singers and haunted fans with the question of "Who shot first?," the director appeared before a United States Senate subcommittee to warn Washington—and, in the process, the public at large—about the dangers of altering classic films.

Lucas and his directorial fraternity brother, Steven Spielberg, were in Washington in March of 1988 to push the country toward adopting the Berne Convention, which protects a work’s copyright across all the countries that participate in the agreement (there were 76 at the time), and defends an artist against having his or her work defaced or altered after it’s completed. This last part was of special concern to Lucas, and was the main driving force behind his trip to D.C.

The film industry’s renewed effort for copyright reform was born in opposition to the colorization and forced editing that classic films were enduring on television. This was highlighted by Ted Turner’s recent acquisition of classic film libraries, such as MGM and United Artists. Though it was seen as sacrilege among film historians, Turner sought to maximize his $1.2 billion investment in MGM by bringing the mostly black-and-white films into the modern age through colorization.

"The last time I checked, I owned the films that we're in the process of colorizing," Turner said in 1986. "I can do whatever I want with them, and if they're going to be shown on television, they're going to be in color."

The “moral rights” of the Berne Convention state that the artist “shall have the right to claim authorship of the work and to object to any derogatory action in relation to the said work which would be prejudicial to his honor or reputation." When Lucas stepped in front of the committee, he urged Washington to bring those rights to the United States.

“People who alter or destroy works of art and our cultural heritage for profit or as an exercise of power are barbarians,” he said. “[And] if the laws of the United States continue to condone this behavior, history will surely classify us as a barbaric society.”

Lucas even took a thinly veiled shot at Turner directly, saying, "There is nothing to stop American films, records, books, and paintings from being sold to a foreign entity or an egocentric gangster who would change our cultural heritage to suit his personal taste."

Lucas also had a prescient warning about the growing dangers of digital effects that could completely alter the content of classic movies: “[More] advanced technology will be able to replace actors with ‘fresher faces,’ or alter dialogue and change the movement of the actor's lips to match.”

The efforts of Lucas and Spielberg helped push the U.S. to adopt the Berne Convention the next year, but the country took a much narrower view of the "moral rights" aspect of the agreement [PDF], ignoring many of the director's most important points. The entire speech can be read over at Save Star Wars, but his point is clear: To Lucas, the alteration of classic films is akin to the destruction of culture and an act of barbarism. Of course, this was 1988—a mere nine years before the release of the Star Wars Trilogy Special Edition, which saw the addition of new characters, special effects, and entire scenes to the original films.

Since that time, Lucas has added numerous other changes to the first three Star Wars movies, with the last round of alterations coming in 2011, right before the director sold the franchise to Disney. To this day, the original versions of the first three Star Wars movies have not made their way to Blu-ray or any sort of legal digital download.

Though Lucas’s impassioned speech may seem hypocritical to some, his focus at the time was aimed at protecting artists from having their work changed without their permission. As the director himself, and the copyright holder of Star Wars, Lucas’s alterations fall well within an artist’s “moral rights.” Well, from a certain point of view.

A Stranger Things Fan Is Selling Epic Demogorgon Dog Costumes on Etsy

Joe Keery, Maya Hawke, Priah Ferguson, and Gaten Matarazzo in Stranger Things.
Joe Keery, Maya Hawke, Priah Ferguson, and Gaten Matarazzo in Stranger Things.
Netflix

Stranger Things is great at placing the truly terrifying alongside the absolutely adorable. One minute we are gushing over Eleven and Mike’s teen romance, and the next we’re jumping off the couch at the sight of those possessed by the Mind Flayer.

No matter how seamless the Duffer Brothers' Netflix series is in weaving together these moments, it seems like it would be impossible to make the Demogorgon cute. But somehow, one crafty fan has done just that.

Etsy shop ThatCraftyFriendShop has created Demogorgon headpieces that fit perfectly on your dog’s head.

People reports that the headpieces range in size from extra small (for 5- to 10-pound dogs) all the way to extra large (for dogs over 75 pounds). Prices range from $25 to $75, depending on the size of your four-legged friend.

These wool and felt doggy costumes are perfect for Halloween, or even a Stranger Things watch party while you continue to binge and re-binge the third seasonwith a decked-out doggy by your side.

[h/t People]

J.K. Rowling Reveals How San Francisco Inspired Major Harry Potter Location

Jamie McCarthy, Getty Images
Jamie McCarthy, Getty Images

The award-winning play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is about to open at the Curran Theater in San Francisco. The two-part drama takes place 19 years after the events in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and depicts Harry’s life as his son, Albus, is about to begin school at Hogwarts.

J.K. Rowling has pointed out that San Francisco had a deep influence on the original Harry Potter novels, SFGate reports. In the video below, Rowling talks about how Alcatraz, the infamous former prison, inspired her creation of Azkaban.

"[San Francisco] is a very distinctive, special place—I love the feel of it, I love the architecture,” Rowling said. “I've actually said this before, but Azkaban is a combination of Alcatraz and Abbadon, which is an old word for hell. I squeezed those words together. The idea of the rock in the middle of the ocean was directly inspired by a visit to Alcatraz."

With its mist and Gothic mood, it’s no wonder this slice of San Francisco inspired a big part of the Harry Potter world.

[h/t SFGate]

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