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Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová star in John Carney's Once.
Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová star in John Carney's Once.
Fox Searchlight

15 Harmonious Facts About Once

Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová star in John Carney's Once.
Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová star in John Carney's Once.
Fox Searchlight

A decade before Damien Chazelle was attempting to bring back the classic Hollywood musical with La La Land, Dublin-born writer/director John Carney gathered up a handful of his musician (read: non-actor) friends and spent 17 days and $150,000 filming an indie musical dramedy that reinvigorated the genre and turned the film’s stars, Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová, into Oscar winners. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Once’s release in U.S. theaters, here are 15 things you might not have known about the musical hit.

1. JOHN CARNEY OUTLINED THE FILM IN FIVE MINUTES.

Once tells the story of an aspiring musician (Glen Hansard) who, when he’s not fixing vacuum cleaners, is busking for loose change in the streets of Dublin. One evening, his music catches the attention of a female flower-seller (Markéta Irglová) who has a vacuum in need of fixing and some musical chops of her own. The two form a fast friendship that flirts with possible romance; their relationship plays out via the film’s music, which acts as a sort of narrator. To a certain degree, the film—which was written and directed by John Carney, a former member of Hansard’s band The Frames—has some autobiographical elements.

The idea for the story came to Carney in 2004, when he was sitting in a café and missing his girlfriend, an actress who was living in London after landing a role that required her to relocate. In just five minutes, he wrote the outline for what would become Once, and told The Guardian that “it never changed … I was sitting there thinking, ‘Where has the Dublin I knew gone?’ The city has shed a lot of its greatness. It has lost its soul. I was seeing all these new immigrants in Dublin and identifying with them. I decided I wanted one character who was a Dubliner and one who was not.”

2. IT WAS ORIGINALLY ENVISIONED AS A VEHICLE FOR CILLIAN MURPHY.


John Carney originally envisioned Cillian Murphy as the star of Once.

Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Considering how integral Hansard’s music is to the narrative of Once, it’s hard to imagine anyone else in the film’s lead. But Carney originally developed the project as a starring vehicle for Cillian Murphy, with whom he had worked on 2001’s On the Edge.

“I originally wanted Cillian Murphy for the role,” Carney told CHUD.com. “I know Cillian, and he can sing. He’s quite a good singer. I thought I’d do the usual thing where you get a good actor who can half sing and train that voice, but then it became clear to everybody on the film that we should do it the other way around, that we should get somebody who could really sing and half act and I’ll trust that I would be able to do something magical with that.”

Other sources state that it was Murphy who opted not to do the project, either because he wasn’t comfortable working opposite an inexperienced non-actor like Irglová (“It’s a real risk for an actor to be in a movie with a non-actor,” Irglová, who was 19 at the time, told The New York Times) and/or because he wasn’t sure he could pull of Hansard’s songs.

“Cillian doesn't like me saying this,” Hansard told the Independent, “but he had reservations about some of my songs. They were quite hard to sing, quite raging. But, then, the character was pretty dark.”

3. GLEN HANSARD REALLY HAD TO BE CONVINCED TO ACT IN THE FILM.

Though Hansard had a small role as Outspan Foster in Alan Parker’s The Commitments, he didn’t consider himself an “actor” and wasn’t particularly interested in becoming one. But Once would be full of his music and, as Carney told The New York Times, “He sells the songs better than anybody.”

Still, as Hansard told CHUD.com, “I was terrified, for a few reasons. I didn’t want to suck for [John’s] sake, and I didn’t want to suck for my own. I’m a reasonably confident person behind a guitar, but in front of a camera is a whole other ball game. I needed him to tell me the truth—are we rubbish, are we going to pull it off, is it going to work? Because if it isn’t, let’s just pack it in.” Eventually, Hansard relented and agreed to step in front of the camera, on the condition: if he sucked, Carney would can him right away.

4. GUY’S GIRLFRIEND IS THE DIRECTOR’S GIRLFRIEND.

In a montage, there are flashback scenes of Guy and his ex-girlfriend. In real life, Guy’s girlfriend was Carney’s girlfriend.

5. THE SCRIPT AND THE MUSIC WERE WRITTEN IN CONCERT WITH EACH OTHER.

“It was a very collaborative process,” Carney said of the music-writing for Once. “I liked being able to work with the songwriter of the musical. In the classic musicals, the songs were already there, and you couldn’t really touch it and you wrote a story around these songs. I liked that I knew Glen and I could communicate with him and say, what do you think about this as a theme, and he would mull it over and come back with a lyric or a title, or with a song that he had written ages ago. It was very much a song here, a scene here, and we would bounce off ideas with the skeleton of the story in place—guy meets girl, he’s broken hearted, she’s this, they come together.”

The songs were written by me and Mar—some before filming, some during, some afterwards,” Hansard told Reverse Shot. “John showed us the script, and we all talked about it for a few weeks. He had a very particular aesthetic, and the fact that he chose us to be in the film made it easier for us to write what he wanted. He would say, ‘I want a song for the scene where Mar walks down the street, and it has to be a certain tone, and we would work on that while we were acting so the whole thing was organic and collaborative.’ But we were definitely working towards John’s agenda."

6. A LOT OF IT IS IMPROVISED, MOSTLY FOR PRACTICAL REASONS.

Because neither Hansard nor Irglová were trained actors, Carney let the actors improvise in order to encourage the most natural performances. “There was a lot of self-deprecation from John on the set,” Hansard told Reverse Shot. “He would say a line he had written was bullsh*t, and ask us to get the idea across in a believable way. It needed to be loose, though, because neither of us had acted before, and it would have made me very stiff if I had had to learn a complete script verbatim. I have no problem behind a guitar, but whenever there was dialogue I was a wreck.”

Irglová echoed Hansard’s concerns, admitting that, “Scripted dialogue was very hard for me because of the language problem. The scene where the characters meet was written out, and I would have never have spoken that way."

7. A LOT OF IT WAS SHOT WITHOUT PERMITS.

An indie film in the truest sense of the word, The Washington Post wrote that, “The movie was shot guerrilla-style on the Dublin streets: no permits, no lighting, no production designers, no wardrobe, no paid extras, no location scouts, no production trailers—just a tiny crew using natural light, a couple of Sony-HD cameras and real places and people, including Hansard's friends and mother. There were no rehearsals, and pre-production largely consisted of viewing sessions of independent films and musicals: Singin' in the Rain, A Woman Under the Influence, a Roman Polanski box set, [and] Francois Truffaut's The 400 Blows."

8. A THEATRICAL RELEASE WASN’T PART OF THE ORIGINAL PLAN FOR THE FILM.

The fact that the film became a hit was as much a surprise to its makers as it was to anyone—especially as they hadn’t even intended to release it in theaters. According to The New York Times, the plan was to have a limited theatrical run in Dublin, but then go straight to DVD in most other markets, and to allow Hansard and the other featured musicians to sell copies of the film as part of their concert swag. Before that, it made a few film festival appearances, which is where one of Sundance’s programmers saw it. Though Once had been rejected by other major fests like Toronto, the Sundance Film Festival invited Carney and company to be a part of the 2007 event, where the film won the Audience Award and was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize. And just like that, Fox Searchlight decided to scoop up the theatrical rights for $500,000.

9. CARNEY PREDICTED THE MOVIE’S OSCAR WIN.

After filming the scene where Hansard and Irglová sing “Falling Slowly” in a music store, Hansard recalled that, “John said, joking, 'And the Oscar for Best Song goes to …' and we all started laughing because of the ridiculousness of the budget we were working on and the way we were shooting this film. We just laughed.”

Following the announcements of the 2008 Academy Award nominations in early January, Hansard called Carney and “said 'Man I remembered last night what you said and I can't believe it, and none of us even dared go there in our heads but my God!'"

At that year’s Oscar ceremony, Hansard and Irglová took home the Oscar for Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Song.

10. WE NEVER LEARN THE LEAD CHARACTERS’ NAMES.

One of Once’s most remarkable achievements is its intimacy; the way the film is acted and shot makes the viewer feel like part of the action. One way Carney extended the relatability of these characters was by never giving them names; they’re simply known as Guy and Girl in the credits.

11. GUY AND GIRL WERE SUPPOSED TO DO THE DEED.


Will they or won't they?
Photo courtesy Fox Searchlight.

    According to The New York Times, the film’s title originally referred to a scene in which Guy and Girl would sleep together—but only once. (Get it?) Though Carney wrote the scene, the actors didn’t think it rang true to the unique nature of the characters’ relationship (Irglová called it “so predictable”), so Carney scrapped it. In his mind, that changed the meaning of the title, too, which he said was a nod to the many people he had met in bars over the years: “They say, ‘Once I do this, then it’ll be great.’ But they never do it. It’s a great Irish tradition of vacillating."

    12. STEVEN SPIELBERG LOVED IT.

      Once was a huge hit with audiences, including a handful of very high-powered moviegoers. Steven Spielberg mentioned the movie to USA Today, saying that, “A little movie called Once gave me enough inspiration to last the rest of the year.”

      13. THE SIMPSONS PAID TRIBUTE TO IT.

      In what might be the greatest pop culture compliment, The Simpsons paid tribute to Once by reuniting Hansard and Irglová for a 2009 episode that recreated the film.

      14. IT WAS TURNED INTO A TONY AWARD-WINNING STAGE PRODUCTION.

      In 2012, Once began a new life on the Broadway stage, with Steve Kazee and Cristin Milioti stepping into the roles made famous by Hansard and Irglová. The play was a bona fide smash, winning eight of its 11 Tony Award nominations.

      15. HANSARD WASN’T THRILLED ABOUT ITS MOVE TO BROADWAY.

        In an interview with the Independent, Hansard admitted that he wasn’t totally thrilled with the idea of turning the film into a play: “True, I didn't like the idea of it becoming a musical—I feared overexposure would kill it—but I suppose it helps me stand up and be in the world. And if I am remembered for that one song, well, there are worse fates."

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        Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová star in John Carney's Once.
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        15 Heartwarming Facts About Mister Rogers
        Getty Images
        Getty Images

        Though Mister Rogers' Neighborhood premiered 50 years ago, Fred Rogers remains an icon of kindness for the ages. An innovator of children’s television, his salt-of-the-earth demeanor and genuinely gentle nature taught a generation of kids the value of kindness. In celebration of the groundbreaking children's series' 50th anniversary, here are 15 things you might not have known about everyone’s favorite “neighbor.”

        1. HE WAS BULLIED AS A CHILD.

        According to Benjamin Wagner, who directed the 2010 documentary Mister Rogers & Me—and was, in fact, Rogers’s neighbor on Nantucket—Rogers was overweight and shy as a child, and often taunted by his classmates when he walked home from school. “I used to cry to myself when I was alone,” Rogers said. “And I would cry through my fingers and make up songs on the piano.” It was this experience that led Rogers to want to look below the surface of everyone he met to what he called the “essential invisible” within them.

        2. HE WAS AN ORDAINED MINISTER.

        Rogers was an ordained minister and, as such, a man of tremendous faith who preached tolerance wherever he went. When Amy Melder, a six-year-old Christian viewer, sent Rogers a drawing she made for him with a letter that promised “he was going to heaven,” Rogers wrote back to his young fan:

        “You told me that you have accepted Jesus as your Savior. It means a lot to me to know that. And, I appreciated the scripture verse that you sent. I am an ordained Presbyterian minister, and I want you to know that Jesus is important to me, too. I hope that God’s love and peace come through my work on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.”

        3. HE RESPONDED TO ALL HIS FAN MAIL.

        Responding to fan mail was part of Rogers’s very regimented daily routine, which began at 5 a.m. with a prayer and included time for studying, writing, making phone calls, swimming, weighing himself, and responding to every fan who had taken the time to reach out to him.

        “He respected the kids who wrote [those letters],” Heather Arnet, an assistant on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in 2005. “He never thought about throwing out a drawing or letter. They were sacred."

        According to Arnet, the fan mail he received wasn’t just a bunch of young kids gushing to their idol. Kids would tell Rogers about a pet or family member who died, or other issues with which they were grappling. “No child ever received a form letter from Mister Rogers," Arnet said, noting that he received between 50 and 100 letters per day.

        4. ANIMALS LOVED HIM AS MUCH AS PEOPLE DID.

        It wasn’t just kids and their parents who loved Mister Rogers. Koko, the Stanford-educated gorilla who understands 2000 English words and can also converse in American Sign Language, was an avid Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood watcher, too. When Rogers visited her, she immediately gave him a hug—and took his shoes off.

        5. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED MUSICIAN.

        Though Rogers began his education in the Ivy League, at Dartmouth, he transferred to Rollins College following his freshman year in order to pursue a degree in music (he graduated Magna cum laude). In addition to being a talented piano player, he was also a wonderful songwriter and wrote all the songs for Mister Rogers' Neighborhood—plus hundreds more.

        6. HIS INTEREST IN TELEVISION WAS BORN OUT OF A DISDAIN FOR THE MEDIUM.

        Rogers’s decision to enter into the television world wasn’t out of a passion for the medium—far from it. "When I first saw children's television, I thought it was perfectly horrible," Rogers told Pittsburgh Magazine. "And I thought there was some way of using this fabulous medium to be of nurture to those who would watch and listen."

        7. KIDS WHO WATCHED MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD RETAINED MORE THAN THOSE WHO WATCHED SESAME STREET.

        A Yale study pitted fans of Sesame Street against Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood watchers and found that kids who watched Mister Rogers tended to remember more of the story lines, and had a much higher “tolerance of delay,” meaning they were more patient.

        8. ROGERS’S MOM KNIT ALL OF HIS SWEATERS.

        If watching an episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood gives you sweater envy, we’ve got bad news: You’d never be able to find his sweaters in a store. All of those comfy-looking cardigans were knitted by Fred’s mom, Nancy. In an interview with the Archive of American Television, Rogers explained how his mother would knit sweaters for all of her loved ones every year as Christmas gifts. “And so until she died, those zippered sweaters I wear on the Neighborhood were all made by my mother,” he explained.

        9. HE WAS COLORBLIND.

        Those brightly colored sweaters were a trademark of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, but the colorblind host might not have always noticed. In a 2003 article, just a few days after his passing, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wrote that:

        Among the forgotten details about Fred Rogers is that he was so colorblind he could not distinguish between tomato soup and pea soup.

        He liked both, but at lunch one day 50 years ago, he asked his television partner Josie Carey to taste it for him and tell him which it was.

        Why did he need her to do this, Carey asked him. Rogers liked both, so why not just dip in?

        "If it's tomato soup, I'll put sugar in it," he told her.

        10. HE WORE SNEAKERS AS A PRODUCTION CONSIDERATION.

        According to Wagner, Rogers’s decision to change into sneakers for each episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood was about production, not comfort. “His trademark sneakers were born when he found them to be quieter than his dress shoes as he moved about the set,” wrote Wagner.

        11. MICHAEL KEATON GOT HIS START ON THE SHOW.

        Oscar-nominated actor Michael Keaton's first job was as a stagehand on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, manning Picture, Picture, and appearing as Purple Panda.

        12. ROGERS GAVE GEORGE ROMERO HIS FIRST PAYING GIG, TOO.

        It's hard to imagine a gentle, soft-spoken, children's education advocate like Rogers sitting down to enjoy a gory, violent zombie movie like Dawn of the Dead, but it actually aligns perfectly with Rogers's brand of thoughtfulness. He checked out the horror flick to show his support for then-up-and-coming filmmaker George Romero, whose first paying job was with everyone's favorite neighbor.

        “Fred was the first guy who trusted me enough to hire me to actually shoot film,” Romero said. As a young man just out of college, Romero honed his filmmaking skills making a series of short segments for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, creating a dozen or so titles such as “How Lightbulbs Are Made” and “Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy.” The zombie king, who passed away in 2017, considered the latter his first big production, shot in a working hospital: “I still joke that 'Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy' is the scariest film I’ve ever made. What I really mean is that I was scared sh*tless while I was trying to pull it off.”

        13. ROGERS HELPED SAVE PUBLIC TELEVISION.

        In 1969, Rogers—who was relatively unknown at the time—went before the Senate to plead for a $20 million grant for public broadcasting, which had been proposed by President Johnson but was in danger of being sliced in half by Richard Nixon. His passionate plea about how television had the potential to turn kids into productive citizens worked; instead of cutting the budget, funding for public TV increased from $9 million to $22 million.

        14. HE ALSO SAVED THE VCR.

        Years later, Rogers also managed to convince the Supreme Court that using VCRs to record TV shows at home shouldn’t be considered a form of copyright infringement (which was the argument of some in this contentious debate). Rogers argued that recording a program like his allowed working parents to sit down with their children and watch shows as a family. Again, he was convincing.

        15. ONE OF HIS SWEATERS WAS DONATED TO THE SMITHSONIAN.

        In 1984, Rogers donated one of his iconic sweaters to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

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        Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová star in John Carney's Once.
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        15 Fun Facts About Army of Darkness
        Universal Pictures
        Universal Pictures

        On February 19, 1993, Army of Darkness—the third installment in Sam Raimi and Bruce Campbell's Evil Dead franchise—made its way into U.S. theaters. You probably know all about Ash’s boomstick, but on the occasion of the hilarious horror comedy's 25th anniversary, it's worth a closer look.

        1. ARMY OF DARKNESS ISN'T THE ENTIRE TITLE.

        The film’s title is stylized onscreen as Bruce Campbell vs. Army of Darkness. This phrasing was Sam Raimi’s homage to the defunct Hollywood tradition of putting stars’ names in movie titles (like Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein)—but the studio feared the long title would confuse moviegoers, so it was shortened for official purposes to just Army of Darkness.

        2. EVEN THE SHORTER TITLE WASN'T RAIMI'S FIRST CHOICE.

        Army of Darkness is the third installment of the Evil Dead series and the first to take place during the Middle Ages. Raimi’s original title for Army of Darkness was The Medieval Dead.

        3. BRIDGET FONDA FINALLY GOT TO WORK WITH RAIMI.

        Bridget Fonda makes a cameoas Ash’s girlfriend Linda during the beginning flashback sequence. She is the third actress in three films to play Linda (following actresses Betsy Baker and Denise Bixler). Fonda—a huge Evil Dead II fan—had originally auditioned to be in Raimi’s previous film, Darkman, but didn’t get the part.

        4. ASH'S CAR HAD A LOT OF SCREEN EXPERIENCE.

        The 1973 Oldsmobile Delta 88 allegedly appears in all of Sam Raimi’s films.

        5. DARKMAN MADE ARMY OF DARKNESS POSSIBLE.

        Raimi wanted to make Army of Darkness immediately following 1987’s Evil Dead II, but he struggled to find funding to finish his trilogy. The financial success of Raimi’s 1990 film, Darkman, eventually convinced Universal Studios to split the $12 million budget with executive producer Dino De Laurentiis.

        6. A SUBTLE SCIENCE FICTION REFERENCE PLAYS A KEY ROLE.

        The words Ash must utter to safely retrieve the Necronomicon (“Klaatu verata nikto”) are actually a variation on a phrase from the original version of The Day the Earth Stood Still. In that film, “Klaatu barada nitko” is the phrase one must say to stop the robot Gort from destroying Earth.

        7. THE SKELETON DEADITES WERE AN HOMAGE.

        Their design is a tribute to visual effects legend Ray Harryhausen.

        8. THE STAY PUFT MARSHMALLOW MAN MAKES AN APPEARANCE.

        Billy Bryan, the actor who portrays the second monster in the medieval pit, also portrayed the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man in Ghostbusters.

        9. SAM RAIMI'S BROTHER WORE A LOT OF HATS.

        Ted Raimi—who makes cameos in all of his brother’s films—appears as three different background characters in Army of Darkness. He is first seen as a sympathetic villager, then as a dying soldier during the final battle, and, finally, as an S-Mart employee in the last scene.

        10. RAIMI HAD TO FIGHT FOR AN R-RATING.

        In keeping with the gory first two films in the series, Army of Darkness received an NC-17 rating from the MPAA. It was subsequently bumped down to an R rating after the filmmakers pointed out that the ostensible gore in the film was happening to skeletons.

        11. PLAYING EVIL ASH WAS TOUGH FOR CAMPBELL.

        It took makeup artists three hours to get Campbell ready for shooting.

        12. RAIMI STORYBOARDED EVERY SINGLE SHOT IN THE MOVIE HIMSELF.

        About 25 shots in the final battle are taken from storyboards originally used in the 1948 Victor Fleming film Joan of Arc, which were brought to Raimi’s attention by visual effects supervisor William Mesa. Mesa got them from a friend, who got them from Fleming himself.

        13. THERE'S AN EASTER EGG FOR TREKKIES.

        Star Trek fans will recognize the location where Ash learns the “Klaatu verata nikto” incantation. The scene was shot at the iconic Vasquez Rocks in Agua Dulce, California, where the famous “Arena” episode from Star Trek was also shot. The movie also shot in the Bronson Canyon area of Griffith Park in Los Angeles that served as the Batcave for the 1960s Batman television show.

        14. THE STUDIO CHANGED THE ENDING.

        Bruce Campbell stars in 'Army of Darkness' (1992)
        Universal Pictures

        The original conclusion of the film—which Universal Studios deemed too negative—featured Ash taking too much potion to get back to the present day and waking up in a future, post-apocalyptic London. The ending can be seen on subsequent director’s cuts of home video versions of Army of Darkness.

        15. EVEN AFTER YEARS OF TRYING, A SEQUEL NEVER MATERIALIZED.

        Beginning in 2015, Bruce Campbell reprised his role as Ash in the Ash vs Evil Dead TV series. While fans of the Evil Dead franchise love it, Raimi spent years trying to get a sequel to Army of Darkness off the ground. On the commentary track for the first season of Ash vs. Evil Dead, Raimi even shared a few of the discarded ideas he had for the film.

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